Monitor vs LCD TV used as a monitor

SoCalRich

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Feb 6, 2010
266
0
NorCal
I'm looking at big monitors to work with Photoshop on. I really like the 30"ACD but I don't like the price.

I can buy a 27"-32" 1920x1080 LCD TV for between 450-550

What are the pro's and con's about using a LCD TV for a monitor. Also, can a LCD TV be color calibrated?

I appreciate any comments of idea's.
 

kasakka

macrumors 68020
Oct 25, 2008
2,063
740
LCD TV won't work for Photoshop because most of them don't properly support the full RGB color space and using this results in crushed blacks and whites. They usually (depending on the model) don't have all that great settings for adjusting color balance.

Another reason why it's not good is that the individual pixels are pretty big since they're meant to be watched a few meters away. Big pixels will look blocky when watched at close range.
 

Transporteur

macrumors 68030
Nov 30, 2008
2,729
3
UK
Furthermore, and that's the biggest disadvantage of LCD TVs vs a decent computer display like the 30" ACD, LCD TVs generally use TN panels which are fine for watching TV, but not for working with them.

The viewing angle is really bad on those panels which is why the colours of such displays aren't stable.

There is a reason LCD TVs are cheap compared to computer displays, they are simply made for watching TV, not for using them on a computer, especially not when you are considering professional photo editing.
 

kasakka

macrumors 68020
Oct 25, 2008
2,063
740
Furthermore, and that's the biggest disadvantage of LCD TVs vs a decent computer display like the 30" ACD, LCD TVs generally use TN panels which are fine for watching TV, but not for working with them.
I guess this might be true of the really cheap TVs (honestly haven't looked into them much) but higher quality ones typically use S-PVA panels. Don't know if they even use IPS panels these days.
 

SoCalRich

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Feb 6, 2010
266
0
NorCal
LCD TV won't work for Photoshop because most of them don't properly support the full RGB color space and using this results in crushed blacks and whites. They usually (depending on the model) don't have all that great settings for adjusting color balance.

Another reason why it's not good is that the individual pixels are pretty big since they're meant to be watched a few meters away. Big pixels will look blocky when watched at close range.
I was wondering about the RGB color space support and color balance calibration. I tried getting close to a LCD and it just looked fuzzy. Not sharp at all. Thanks...

Furthermore, and that's the biggest disadvantage of LCD TVs vs a decent computer display like the 30" ACD, LCD TVs generally use TN panels which are fine for watching TV, but not for working with them.

The viewing angle is really bad on those panels which is why the colours of such displays aren't stable.

There is a reason LCD TVs are cheap compared to computer displays, they are simply made for watching TV, not for using them on a computer, especially not when you are considering professional photo editing.
TN panels are not what I want. Thanks

I'm waiting to see what this new 27" ACD is going to be like. I'm afraid that the possibility of the same problems that are happening with the iMac panels is very high. I believe they are the same design. Economy of scale is why I think this. It wouldn't make sense to have a completely different design for a stand alone panel and an all in one iMac.

Just my thought...

Thanks guys...
 

MisterMe

macrumors G4
Jul 17, 2002
10,650
28
USA
I guess this might be true of the really cheap TVs (honestly haven't looked into them much) but higher quality ones typically use S-PVA panels. Don't know if they even use IPS panels these days.
OK. Be hard-headed. As has been stated above: LCD-TV sets are TV sets. Several years ago, they included DVI-D ports. However, DVI-D ports have been replaced by HDMI. Many TV sets continue to include VGA ports. However, VGA ports may not allow access to the full-resolution of the panel.

OTOH, computer monitors are intended to be used as computer monitors. Their LCD panels are of substantially higher quality than those of TV sets. Monitors include DVI-D ports giving access to the full resolution of the panel.