More election shenanigans - Cambridge Analytica and Facebook and Trump

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by VulchR, Mar 17, 2018.

  1. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #1
    Apparently, one of the firms hired by Trump's campaign, Cambridge Analytica, is being investigated for paying for 'harvested' Facebook data that was collected by another company and then sold on in violation of Facebook's policies (see BBC link). Not sure if this is illegal, but the harvesting seems to have occurred by a company in the UK, and the UK is still in the EU, and the EU takes a dim view of violating people's online privacy (typically requiring very explicit consent for the use of their data). This could get interesting if an investigation begins in the UK, for Trump can't fire the investigators... or it might be a nothingburger. At a minimum though, Facebook doesn't seem too happy with Cambridge Analytica and has suspended them from Facebook.
     
  2. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    What I'd like to know is how they did it because if it was just normal data mining any firm can do it.
     
  3. samcraig macrumors P6

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    Likely one of the contributing factors to GDPR. If GDPR was in effect, they would be so massively screwed.
     
  4. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    They could be in trouble anyway. GDPR is replacing some statute from the mid-90s. I am not sure how protections have been expanded for GDPR but it's not like there was no protection prior to 2016, when GDPR was rolled out with a "comply by" date sometime in late spring of this year.
     
  5. VulchR thread starter macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    Like I said, I am not sure any crime has been broken, but selling user information on from Facebook violates the cpompany's policy, so at a minimum it is underhanded.
     
  6. Zenithal macrumors 604

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    From what I've read, users took stupid surveys typical of the site. Now, I've never used Facebook and don't see the point of it. Surveys were supposedly something moronic such as "Do you like eating ice cream on a hot day" and by taking and agreeing to the survey, they allowed the third party access to various details of their profile. A lot of third party services on various platforms can access that data. They built profiles and supposedly used the data for tailored ads. Similar but not quite like how Google serves ads based on your search history or keywords on various pages on third party websites.

    I don't believe the extraction of user data is unlawful in the US because it isn't a breach of data, but if Cambridge Analytica operate in any capacity in EU countries, they're definitely breaking laws alongside Facebook.
     
  7. VulchR thread starter macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    I think the company that extracted the information from Facebook for Cambridge Analytica is in the UK. Certainly that company might be in hot water, and possibly Facebook as well, as you say.
     
  8. SoggyCheese Suspended

    SoggyCheese

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    #8
    There won't be an investigation. The Mercers have their allies in the right-wing British tabloids, Dacre and Murdoch for instance, and the weak ineffective excuse for a government the UK has can't even think of stepping out of line because they know they're toast if they do.

    So once again the British people will be hung out to dry by the useless crowd in Westminster......but I'm sure that too will be spun as somehow the EU's fault.
     
  9. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #9
    GDPR is an EU rule, so strictly I think Facebook doesn’t have to apply it to US citizens.

    Lots of companies are applying it globally for simplicity.
     
  10. samcraig macrumors P6

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    #10
    From my understanding, one reason is that if you are a UK citizen traveling to the US (for example) the law still applies.
     
  11. Snoopy4 macrumors 6502a

    Snoopy4

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  12. chagla macrumors 6502a

    chagla

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    #12
  13. ericgtr12 macrumors 65816

    ericgtr12

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    #13
    Trump put forward a compelling counter-argument to make his case.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. oldhifi macrumors 65816

    oldhifi

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  15. ericgtr12 macrumors 65816

    ericgtr12

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    #15
    Breaking from Today.com

     
  16. sean000 macrumors 68000

    sean000

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    Heard Senator Amy Klobuchar interviewed on NPR this morning regarding her call for Zuckerberg to testify before the Judiciary Committee so we can learn more about how this company gained so much access to so many profiles. There could be some big fines ahead for Facebook, but yes they will likely defend themselves by saying customers agreed to their terms of service and agreed to take surveys that allowed third parties to access profiles. The Senator did not seem to think the TOS argument would stand, because Cambridge Analytica's access and actions go beyond the understanding that most people have of the TOS (not that most people read it).

    I'm not terribly active on Facebook, but I'm amazed at how many of my friends post results from those quizzes that require you to grant access to your profile information, photos, friends list, etc. I've tried to warn them by posting on my wall that you can take those quizzes and manually share your results without granting access to your profile (of course your browser will probably get a few suspicious third party cookies if you don't have those blocked, but at least you won't be giving away your complete profile information AND your friends' contact info/photos).

    I maintain my Facebook account because it's really the only way some of my friends and family stay in contact (despite my attempts to use other channels with my family). I'm starting to wonder if it's no longer worth it. Now I suppose that the end-result of all this will be that Facebook (and other social network platforms) tightens their policies regarding privacy, and issues much sterner warnings before FB users agree to give up their privacy to a third party. Hopefully this will include some oversight, because clearly these companies can't be trusted to police themselves.
     
  17. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #17
    Excuse me, but me uploading a photo of me and it showing what I would look like as a female is not stupid!
     
  18. IWantItThatWay Suspended

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    #18
    Wow I have never seen people act so irrational after a loss.

    Steve Jobs reacted to Google's thievery more rationally than people reacted to Trump winning.

    All before the election it was Trump had no chance to win. Hell before the election Trump COULDN'T win because he wasn't using data. Remember that? Clinton had the greatest data operation in HISTORY while Trump had nothing.
    --- Post Merged, Mar 19, 2018 ---
    I remember during election night, nearly all the networks said that when Trump was down in Florida that Trump not having a data operation was going to be the difference as to why Clinton will pull it out. Literally ON election night they were still saying Clinton's superior data operation was going to be the difference maker.

    When you're so confident and end up being dead wrong, how does that affect someone's psyche?
     
  19. VulchR thread starter macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #19
    I guess you would have to ask the pundits who made those predictions. That being said, Trump did win, but not by the popular vote, and not by much in the states that turned the tide. Even in Florida, the state you cited, he won 49% to 47.8%. Finally, people reacted perfectly rationally to Trump's winning - most of the people did not want him so most of the people were disappointed.
     
  20. IWantItThatWay Suspended

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    #20
    Are you being serious? I need to know. This sounds like a parody post.

    And lol @ blaming "pundits." Literally EVERYONE thought that Trump's lack of a "ground game" and "data operation" was going to be his downfall.

    Obama literally said Trump was not going to win. What happens when daddy's little princess is told she's not a princess? She's not going to react rationally.
     
  21. VulchR thread starter macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #21
    Troll elsewhere please, comrade.
     
  22. IWantItThatWay Suspended

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    #22
    What was your reaction when Romney said Russia was our number 1 geopolitical foe?
    --- Post Merged, Mar 19, 2018 ---
    New York Times praises Obama for advanced data mining. Just lololol....

    https://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/08/the-obama-campaigns-technology-the-force-multiplier/

    Maxine Waters Confirms "Big Brother" Database 2013



    http://dailycaller.com/2018/03/19/facebook-trump-obama-cambridge-data/
     
  23. sean000 macrumors 68000

    sean000

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    #23
    Regardless of whether or not it had any impact on the election, aren't you just a bit concerned that a private company may have accessed and exploited millions of online profiles that people thought were more protected/private than they actually were? The connection to Trump's campaign certainly adds to the putrid cesspool that surrounds a president who lost the popular vote, but it wouldn't be the first time a political campaign bought demographic information and tried to forge new ways to reach and influence voters. That's what campaigns do, although this might be the first to do so in such a creepy and privacy-invading way. The larger issue is the protection of information that social network users assume is visible only to people they intended to share it with. You can make the argument that folks ought to read the fine print, but that argument probably won't impress the Judiciary Committee. They will likely find that Facebook, and other social media companies, have a greater responsibility to protect user data by more strictly limiting what third parties can access.
     
  24. iLunar macrumors 6502

    iLunar

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    #24
    Pretty insane amount of corruption happening in the right wing. I’m sure Trumpsters will deflect to something Clinton/Obama, but ignoring this story just proves they hate democracy and a complete betrayal of US ideals of free and fair elections.
     
  25. ChrisWB macrumors 6502

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