Mumbai terror trial leads to a guilty verdict

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by mkrishnan, May 3, 2010.

  1. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #1
    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...y-2-Indians-walk-free/articleshow/5887615.cms

    The attack and the results of the trial are interesting on several fronts...

    - It was a case of terrorism with a predominantly civilian response. Clearly, the Mumbai police actions that ultimately stopped the terror attack were very slow, but at the same time, there has been no "non-enemy combatant" or indefinite detention involved here.

    - As far as I can tell, the government appears to be complying with the acquittal of the two Indians accused of supporting the plot

    - The case was prosecuted and resolved extremely quickly by Indian standards, but it also resulted in a trial that is generally being called fair and balanced.

    - The judiciary appears to some extent to be agreeing with Pakistan's

    Curious how this will play out. Mumbaikars have gone back to regular life, by and large, but this attack was a signal event in India, even though there are many more terrorist attacks and plots on Indian soil than there have been on US soil, before and after this. This may end up being a test case of what happens when the existing legal system is used to deal with a terrorist without modification.
     
  2. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    UK
    #2
    Good for the Indians for not going down the "enemy combatant" route.
     
  3. mkrishnan thread starter Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
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    #3
    And... they've followed up with applying the death penalty (which is rarely used, as I understand it, even in terrorism trials, in India).

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/07/world/asia/07mumbai.html?hp

    There continues to be discussion about police behavior in the case, particularly with respect to the two Indian collaborators, who were both acquitted (see link). In essence, the police are accused of fabricating evidence in those cases (e.g., a map that was supposedly recovered from the dirty, soaked pants pocket of one of the killed terrorists was itself pristine). It didn't look like the evidence tampering issues extended to the terrorist himself, though, against whom evidence seemed quite compelling. However, I'm glad it's getting attention -- a la Slumdog Millionaire, Indian police are often accused of using improper methods, and a spotlight on them may force them to modernise.

    Meanwhile, the US appears to be poised to provide Indian investigators access to Headley in the next few weeks (link). He appears to be the next major lead in this case, since there isn't enough evidence in Indian hands at this point, apparently, to get Pakistan to cooperate with the remaining Pakistani citizens implicated in the plot.
     

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