my 2 year old macbook has 16gb of ram and was cheaper than the new 2016s

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by macmee, Nov 23, 2016.

  1. macmee Suspended

    macmee

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    #1
    Just saying... I keep removing the new MBP from my cart on apple.com because of the RAM, CPU to price being so crap. How can anyone justify paying so much for something with so little ram?
     
  2. bcave098 macrumors 6502

    bcave098

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    #2
    Relatively speaking, they're the similarly priced as the first models of the last generation (Retina, 2012). About the RAM, feel free to read the dozens of forum topics about it,
     
  3. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #3
    I'm assuming your 2 year old MacBook also has a better display, Thunderbolt 3, 3.1GB/s SSD speeds, a better GPU, is thinner, lighter, has a larger trackpad, and sports 2133MHz RAM rather than 1600MHz? Can't forget the emoji bar, of course. ;)

    They're good machines. But so are the previous gens. The Mac you're currently sporting isn't suddenly less capable just because a new one was released. I know people who mix and master music on 15" 2012 cMBPs just fine. Music from a decade ago was recorded on hardware with less power than our phones.

    If it's simply a case of "you're only good as the mobile hardware you use", we'd all be sporting 8-inch MSI laptops with 15 minutes battery life. If you need it, buy it. If your current Mac is just fine, then why worry?
     
  4. deany macrumors 68030

    deany

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    #4
    We had a Directors meeting at work today and we all agreed Apple will U turn on the soldering of the SSD in the rMBP approx first half of 2017.
    When apple do, we will consider buying the rMBP, but definitely not before.
    We dont like the P**s taken out of us.
     
  5. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    #5
    It is real easy to justify a purchase when one doesn't base said purchase on your, or anyone else's approval rating.

    If your current Mac is working well for you, and you don't like the price of the new Macs, don't get one. Real simple that way.
     
  6. Ender17 macrumors regular

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    #6
    Why do you think they will do that? They've been moving in this direction for a while now.
     
  7. rawweb macrumors 6502a

    rawweb

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    #7
    I can't think of any recent examples that Apple reversed course on. Further, this is a trend they have been moving toward since 2012 (since the death of cMP, cMBP, glued iMacs, heck Steve Jobs). If you don't like it, you may want to consider looking elsewhere. As computers get thinner and thinner, this is a side effect. It's also a sign that they don't want people playing inside the machine anymore.
     
  8. skids929 macrumors 6502a

    skids929

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    #8


    Why would you bother? It's been said time and again on all these forums since the release, forums you've probably been reading, that if your machine is a year or three old probably won't find this model worth upgrade. I am coming from an 11 year old MB, and it's like Heaven. I plan to keep this one 5-7 max. It's a great machine, but if I had a perfectly good computer in my house that was only a few years old I would find SOOOO many other things to throw my money at than a 2016 MBP.
     
  9. wherewuz macrumors member

    wherewuz

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    #9
    Dude, didn't you read his post? He was at THE directors' meeting. He's clearly a very big deal and knows what he's talking about.
     
  10. skids929 macrumors 6502a

    skids929

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    #10

    Please tell me you're kidding.
     
  11. monkeydax macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Yeah, the Directors' meeting he was in can determine what Apple is going to do in the next year!
     
  12. rawweb, Nov 23, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016

    rawweb macrumors 6502a

    rawweb

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    #12
    He was talking with Mr. Gore, at the  Board of Directors!
     
  13. deany, Nov 23, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2016

    deany macrumors 68030

    deany

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    #13
    Hi
    'I can't think of any recent examples that Apple reversed course on.'

    When I said in June apple would include a 3.5 to lightning adapter in the box FREE on the iPhone 7 I was ridiculed.

    "apple never give adapters away free, they didn't when they went from 30 pin to lightning in September 2012".

    'Steve Jobs'

    the MacBook Pro was originally touted as an accessible, repairable machine to add memory, to add cards, to add drives.” That’s part of what I love about my MacBook Pro. I’ve upgraded my RAM, and I even replaced my optical drive with an 80GB SSD.

    www.wired.com/2012/06/opinion-apple-retina-displa/amp/?client=safari

    'Playing with machines'

    Are you saying swaping an entry level 256GB SSD with a 2TB SSD in 3 years time in 'playing with the machine'. With respect it sounds a bit patronising to be honest.

    I'm not convienced the rMBP 2016 'thinness' couldn't be achieved with a removable SSD.

    Also having to bin your SSD with possible data loss if your logic board goes (one of our 2015 iMacs has just had a replacement logic board - £600 repair under apple care, the machine booted up with all data from old SSD).

    If this happened on an out of warrantee 2016 rMBP a logic board AND SSD repair cost would almost certainly mean repair would not be financially feasable. Plus again not forgetting possible data loss. I understand there is a 'hidden' port but I cant see apple repair getting data from the SSD as part of the repair service.
     
  14. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    How is that an example of Apple reversing course? I don't think there's a connection with what some random internet dude said and "Apple reversing course".

    The linked video is from 1999 for the PowerMac G3 desktop. The quote you tout was for the side-hinged door that was pretty slick compared to traditional towers of the time that you had to unscrew and slide off the side panel. But that was 17 years ago - times have changed.

    Did you seriously just try to completely misrepresent a 17 year old video clip about the PowerMac to make a point about the 2016 MBP?

    I keep seeing these posts (maybe they're all from you?) referring to losing your data on the MBP's SSD if it dies. If you don't want to lose your data in the event of drive failure, have a backup plan. That's how you take care of your data. And technically speaking, whether the SSD is removable or not, it's extremely unlikely you're recovering your data if the SSD dies.

    The SSD's in the new MBP's should actually be more reliable because the memory chips are directly soldered to the logic board. That's one of the key reasons everything is now soldered to the logic board - reliability. Most of the whiners around here don't understand the technical aspects of computer design - they're too busy mouthing off about how Apple is trying to rip everyone off and the giant conspiracy that Apple only wants to sell dongles (I guess the watchband meme got old).

    :rolleyes:
     
  15. MH01 macrumors G4

    MH01

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    #15
    In which case please feel free to provide evidence that soldered components are more reliable . I see little evidence that apologists understand technical aspects of computer design.

    Given the new MacBook Pro does not have a MagSafe connector and will spend so much time flying around and hitting hard surfaces, you may have a very valid point that the ram or ssd might come loose from the connector....well, you put it back in . Though the least of your problems when your laptop is dropped.

    Though again please proof how soldered Ram/ssd is more reliable than one attached via a connector. This is one of the silliest things I have seen on these forums. Technical aspects of computer design ....please...the new MacBook Pro is just not user serviceable , please stop stop making excuses for it .
     
  16. deany macrumors 68030

    deany

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    #16
    A large number of people said apple would NEVER give a FREE adapter away.
    I think its an excellent example of apple reversing course.

    You conveniently missed my link http://www.wired.com/2012/06/opinion-apple-retina-displa/amp/?client=safari yet accuse me of misrepresenting. Worth reading esp. Re: Steve Jobs and Pro customers.

    "I keep seeing these posts (maybe they're all from you?) "

    dont patronise me.


    We have a backup plan thank you.

    • Time machine to Time Capsule
    • Backblaze
    • CCC TC to USB 3 kept off site.

    What happens to the data loss since last TM backup my understanding is an hour can pass.

    Someone on MR recently said our backup plan is better than 94% of everyday users.

    What about the folks that fall in the 94% category?
     
  17. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    You reduce the number of parts and mechanical connections that can break or come loose. Engineering 101.
     
  18. bcave098 macrumors 6502

    bcave098

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    #18
    I just feel like noting that in the same video, Jobs says that people don't care about specs but do care about colour.
     
  19. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    #19
    Again, not sure what a "large number of people" said on MacRumors has to do with Apple "reversing course" by providing a headphone adapter?

    Yeah, I admit skipping right over it after realizing that you completely misrepresented the first link I actually wasted time on. The second link is a long op-ed piece... if you had more credibility, I might take your word for it that it's worth the read.

    So what does any of that have to do with whether the SSD is removable or not? Oh, right... nothing.

    Okay, LOL, we're done here. Some of you guys can be such a chuckle.
     
  20. deany macrumors 68030

    deany

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    #20
    Why did Phil Schiller fail to mention this wonderful feat of
    engineering in his key note?
     
  21. Brandon Hobart macrumors member

    Brandon Hobart

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    United Kingdom
    #21
    Yeah, that's the reason I quit for buying the new MacBook Pro as I don't feel a significant difference in their new product and the already existing ones other than the price thingy :cool:
     
  22. deany, Nov 23, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016

    deany macrumors 68030

    deany

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    #22
    Because if the logic board fails (as ours did on a 2015 iMac) the old hard drive can be reused zero loss of data and the SSD is not put in the bin with the logic board.

    Chuckle away all you like.
     
  23. MH01 macrumors G4

    MH01

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    Feb 11, 2008
    #23
    The engineering 101 here is space saving actually. Its in fact due to reliabilty that computers come with certain replaceable components, the components that are the most unreliable and need to be replaced. You can get a server that has ram, storage, cpu build onto the motherboard....that would be a huge mistake....from a reliability point of view. I don't think I need to explain this.

    Again please provide any proof that Ram or SSD using connectors is less reliable than soldered counterpart. If you have ever put together a computer or replaced the ram on a machine you will find that these are not some loose connections, the engineers who designed them knew what they were doing and the connections are very tight with locking mechanisms, for these to become loose on a laptop, we are talking a big amount of force , in which case you have damaged other parts.

    what you actually have here is a classic example of planned obsolescence, where ram or SSD etc that is just as reliable be it soldered or connected has by its nature got a limited lifespan, one is replaceable and the other is not.
    --- Post Merged, Nov 23, 2016 ---
    Exactly. Computer engineers are not idiots, and there is a very good reason a motherboard has components that are interchangeable. CPU, GPU, RAM etc fail, they are replaced and you are back in business with little impact, many hot swappable. When everything is attached to the same logic board, its a disaster waiting to happen, one component fails and you have just lost everything, with no recovery. Imagine a data centre where you have to throw out a rack every time some thing goes wrong.....suppliers dream, owners nightmare.
     
  24. deany, Nov 23, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2016

    deany macrumors 68030

    deany

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    #24
    Totally agree.

    My example from personal experience is based on a logic board failure and now on the new rMBP the SSD and RAM would be binned. But as you say if the SSD or RAM fails the whole logic board needs replacing as well.

    I see this as incredibly wasteful by apple, with no positives for the end user.

    Apple make a big deal about their eco friendly "green" server centres, stores, mothership etc.

    Yet they are quite happy to bin RAM and SSDs that may not be broken due to soldering the components, that shouldn't be soldered in the first place.
     
  25. ixxx69 macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    Okay, now I understand what you were getting at... that is a neat feature of a removable drive. Still doesn't out-weight the pros, still wouldn't make a difference to me or 90% of the laptop market, so I'm still pleased with the direction Apple is going with thinner and lighter laptops at the expense of user-serviceable parts.

    And FTR, I'm not against what you want. I'm all for demoting the current MBP line as replacements for the MBA/MB and having separate more power-centric MBP's. I just understand (even if I don't personally agree with) Apple's thinking about the market.
     

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