My vizio tv will soon support airplay 2, will this macboo pro be able to run 4k 60fps content to it?

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by iemcj, Jun 13, 2019 at 8:24 PM.

  1. iemcj macrumors 6502

    iemcj

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2015
    #1
    https://support.apple.com/kb/sp704?locale=en_US

    So I'm rocking a 2011 macbook pro that won't support airplay 2. I'm looking at one on craigslist that's a 2014 retina macbook pro with the i7. The apple website says

    HDMI video output​

    • Support for 1080p resolution at up to 60Hz=

    • Support for 3840-by-2160 resolution at 30Hz

    • Support for 4096-by-2160 resolution at 24Hz

    But that's through HDMI, if I'm using the wireless airplay to use a 4k screen can it then go at the normal 2160p 60fps? Just wondering if I need a certain year of laptop to be able to do this, thanks!
     
  2. BODYBUILDERPAUL macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    #2
    Being honest, i'm seriously not convinced that any smart TV will have the processing power to handle 4K at 60fps. It takes a hell of a lot of power to do that hence the reason why Apple TV 4K is sold will a mighty A10X Fusion chip.

    A shoot in 4K 60fps for my athletes and my gosh, those files are power hungry!

    IMO AirPlay is the stupidest idea ever for smart Tvs. With higher frame rates and people shooting in 4K on their iPhones, the whole experience is not going to be nice and sadly, it's going to fall back on Apple and people will blame their Apple products when it doesn't work flawlessly and they'll tell their friends...
     
  3. oneMadRssn macrumors 601

    oneMadRssn

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Location:
    New England
    #3
    You only need processing power for decoding HEVC decoding, and the chips in those TVs are plenty powerful enough to handle it. Think about it, if they can decode Netflix 4K streams, they can decode any other 4k HEVC stream too.

    To answer OPs question, I don't think AirPlay supports 4k resolutions for other reasons. Also, the Mac sending the stream has to essentially act as the encoder, and the 2011-era chips are not optimized at all for HEVC. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think any Intel chips supported 4k hardware encoding/decoding of HEVC until the 7th generation i-core processors. And doing it in software is a slog.

    I'd suggest using Infuse instead of Airplay - just sharing the video file over the network from the Mac, and letting Infuse grab it, decode it, and play it.
     
  4. iemcj thread starter macrumors 6502

    iemcj

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2015
    #4
    Thank you for the help. The main reason I would have use for this is in-person sales and consultations which means I'm using Keynote and other presentation software. For things like slideshows then pft, just sending it to the second screen by 30fps is totally fine but there are videos every now and again that are at 60fps and not having those get choppy would be awesome.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 14, 2019 at 8:10 AM ---
    You may be confused on how much processing power it takes, heck I have an old TCL 4k tv I can plug in 4k gopro footage from a USB drive and it plays it perfectly without hickups.

    Airplay is just a transfer protocol to stream video. Heck even my 3 year old iphone 8 plus can play back 4k 60fps footage just fine, all of the processing is done locally and you're only transmitting the final signal wirelessly
     
  5. chrfr macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2009
    #5
    Apple wants the Apple TV 4k to be a gaming device, that's why it has so much CPU power. Playing 4k content doesn't require anything close to that much CPU.
     
  6. oneMadRssn macrumors 601

    oneMadRssn

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Location:
    New England
    #6
    I can't find the actual resolution limits of AirPlay, but a popular app that takes advantage of AirPlay is Beamer, and they say its limited to 1080p resolution.
     
  7. BODYBUILDERPAUL macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    #7
    I'm not convinced! We are talking 60 fps here!
    Good luck with it if you think that a basic Smart TV will perform flawlessly with it. You really can't sell me the benefits of smart TVs. They are truly bad news and should not be relied upon.
     
  8. iemcj, Jun 14, 2019 at 3:00 PM
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019 at 3:22 PM

    iemcj thread starter macrumors 6502

    iemcj

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2015
    #8
    Again, I'm concerned you don't understand what this actually is. There isn't any rendering being done on the tv side of things.

    It's no different than when you plug in an HDMI cable. The process of decoding and converting the file into a video signal is already done when it gets to your tv. The only difference is the signal is coming in via wifi instead of a physical cable. And 4k content, even at 60fps, doesn't take a ton of bandwidth beyond what a basic home router can do lol.
     
  9. Michelasso macrumors 6502

    Michelasso

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2012
    Location:
    Treviso, Italy
    #9
    4K HDR YouTube video at 60 fps (nearly 60Mbps bandwidth):
    upload_2019-6-17_19-54-8.jpeg

    the only issue with YouTube.. is the YouTube app. Sometime it may drop some frames (Android, you know...). But once downloaded the video, playing it with Sony's Video app (via USB for example) it works just fine.

    The CPU is junk on my Bravia TV, but there is a coprocessor just for VP9.2 and HEVC decoding.
     

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8 June 13, 2019