Navy SEAL who shot Bin Laden slams Sarah Huckabee Sanders for praising ‘success’ at the VA

LIVEFRMNYC

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8 years from now, the VA hospitals will still be crap.

https://www.rawstory.com/2017/06/navy-seal-who-shot-bin-laden-slams-sarah-huckabee-sanders-for-praising-success-at-the-va/

During her tirade against the American press corps this week, Deputy White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders chided reporters for not covering stories like the Trump administration’s “success” at reforming the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Robert J. O’Neill, the former Navy SEAL who shot Osama Bin Laden, took Sanders to task for her praise of the VA on Twitter by saying the department is far from fixed.

“I just heard Sarah Huckabee talk about ‘successes’ at the VA,” he wrote on Twitter. “PLEASE explain and I would LOVE to debate you. VA is a damn insult to vets!!”

O’Neill then ripped the conditions at VA hospitals — and he even claimed that a VA staff member stole his wallet one time when he was getting a CAT scan.

“I want to invite Sarah Huckabee to go with me to ANY VA to see how awful they are,” he wrote. “I’m sure daddy got you better healthcare… and that job!”
 

vrDrew

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Abolish Medicaid, Medicare, and the VA and give every person universal healthcare..
Well, yes.

But before we get there, we need to deal with the fact that there are incredible structural political and economic roadblocks to such an outcome. Like the fact that the Republicans have brainwashed a significant fraction of the voting public into believing that any Government intervention in healthcare is some sort of sinister plot to turn this country into a Communist dictatorship.
 

VulchR

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Well, yes.

But before we get there, we need to deal with the fact that there are incredible structural political and economic roadblocks to such an outcome. Like the fact that the Republicans have brainwashed a significant fraction of the voting public into believing that any Government intervention in healthcare is some sort of sinister plot to turn this country into a Communist dictatorship.
But death panels.... ;)
 

samcraig

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Jun 22, 2009
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One of Trump and his surrogates problems - they tout "success" when there's nothing there. Having a meeting or signing something is not the success that they brag it to be. Something isn't fixed the day a meeting happens or signing an EO. Success and results take time.

Huckabees comment made it sound like the moment Trump lifted a finger - all the problems with VA magically disappeared.
 

Gutwrench

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8 years from now, the VA hospitals will still be crap.
Pfffttt.

The new administration has been in for six months. Try to be more objective.

Having said that Trump better get some updates out on improving the VA because the clock is ticking on him as far as I'm concerned.
 

noekozz

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One of Trump and his surrogates problems - they tout "success" when there's nothing there. Having a meeting or signing something is not the success that they brag it to be. Something isn't fixed the day a meeting happens or signing an EO. Success and results take time.

Huckabees comment made it sound like the moment Trump lifted a finger - all the problems with VA magically disappeared.

Don't you know by now, anything Trump signs is a success, who cares about implementation.
 

LIVEFRMNYC

macrumors 604
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Pfffttt.

The new administration has been in for six months. Try to be more objective.

Having said that Trump better get some updates out on improving the VA because the clock is ticking on him as far as I'm concerned.
I'll be more objective when the Trump administration stops calling is his VA plan a success way too immaturely. (Hence what the whole story is about)
 

Gutwrench

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Jan 2, 2011
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I'll be more objective when the Trump administration stops calling is his VA plan a success way too immaturely. (Hence what the whole story is about)
I read the story. He had better make improvements. I'm not ready to grab a pitchfork and torch like you yet.
 

diamond.g

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Mar 20, 2007
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You have no idea. I have VA stories that make medieval leeches and bleeding seem like cutting edge medicine.
The VA has a captive audience. What makes folks think that there is going to be actual visible to Vets change? Maybe Vets would be better off going GenPop for medical needs...
 

VulchR

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You have no idea. I have VA stories that make medieval leeches and bleeding seem like cutting edge medicine.
I have some. I grew near DC during the war in Vietnam - there were a lot of military families with sons returning disabled or otherwise damaged. :( I must say though, that one of my recent visits coming home to the US coincided with Veterans Day and the town where my sister lives put on a parade etc. I was shocked to see the number of young men with missing limbs. It seemed even worse than Vietnam. I wonder how many ex-soldiers now are dealing with the aftermath of serious injury from our various conflicts. The number must be huge.
 
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dogslobber

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I have some. I grew near DC during the war in Vietnam - there were a lot of military families with sons returning disabled or otherwise damaged. :( I must say though, that one of my recent visits coming home to the US coincided with Veterans Day and the town where my sister lives put on a parade etc. I was shocked to see the number of young men with missing limbs. It seemed even worse than Vietnam. I wonder how many ex-soldiers now are dealing with the aftermath of serious injury from our various conflicts. The number must be huge.
You must always treat your returning vets as you would expect your own sons and daughters to be treated. It is shameful how this country treats them with lack of resources. But the wider issue is sending them to unjust wars in the first place which are all driven by the industrial war complex. Bush should be in jail with Trump for the illegal Iraq war.
 

hulugu

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I have some. I grew near DC during the war in Vietnam - there were a lot of military families with sons returning disabled or otherwise damaged. :( I must say though, that one of my recent visits coming home to the US coincided with Veterans Day and the town where my sister lives put on a parade etc. I was shocked to see the number of young men with missing limbs. It seemed even worse than Vietnam. I wonder how many ex-soldiers now are dealing with the aftermath of serious injury from our various conflicts. The number must be huge.
Unfortunately, we shouldn't be surprised.

We're fighting wars in which IEDs are one of the the primary weapons, and the confluence of modern battlefield medicine and body armor mean that many soldiers survive severe wounds to their extremities.

As an LA Times article from 2006 notes:

...
During the Vietnam War, where the nearest combat support hospital was in Japan, it took an average of 45 days to move a wounded soldier from the battlefield to a U.S. hospital. In Iraq, it takes less than four days.

Medevac helicopters are able to fly quickly over the flat desert landscape. Surgeons say no wounded American in Iraq is more than 30 minutes from a combat hospital, where treatment is as good as at any U.S. trauma center. In many ways, it is better. In a single busy night, combat surgeons can repair a greater number of ghastly and complex wounds than a big-city trauma surgeon might see in a year.

In a war with no fixed front, military hospitals in Iraq are closer than ever to the places where American troops are felled — most often by roadside bombs, but also by rockets, mortars and gunshots. There are four major combat hospitals in Iraq: The Air Force hospital in Balad, and Army combat support hospitals in Baghdad, Mosul and Tikrit.

Many of the most seriously wounded would have died in previous wars. In Vietnam, soldiers often bled to death before reaching a hospital. Because the wounded in Iraq are evacuated so quickly, 96% of those who make it alive to the Balad and Baghdad hospitals are saved.

On the battlefield, medics are better-prepared. The lowliest grunt is given specialized lifesaver training, particularly in the use of tourniquets to control bleeding. New blood-clotting agents and improved field bandages have helped save lives.

Despite the destructive force of roadside bombs, the rate of wounded who die is lower in Iraq than for any war in U.S. history. Since the war began three years ago, about 10% of those wounded have died of their injuries, according to the Pentagon, down from 24% during the Vietnam War and 30% during World War II. The highest lethality rate was 42%, during the Revolutionary War.
 

Technarchy

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You must always treat your returning vets as you would expect your own sons and daughters to be treated. It is shameful how this country treats them with lack of resources. But the wider issue is sending them to unjust wars in the first place which are all driven by the industrial war complex. Bush should be in jail with Trump for the illegal Iraq war.
Lack of resources? You don't know the VA well do you? I can't get too deep into it because of NDA, but trust me when I say resources is not the VA's problem. It's way deeper than that.
 
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hulugu

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Lack of resources? You don't know the VA well do you? I can't get too deep into it because of NDA, but trust me when I say resources is not the VA's problem. It's way deeper than that.
The VA has severe management problems, however, the agency has also been historically underfunded especially considering the vast number of wounded veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan.

It's correct to blame VA administrators for cooking the books—uncovered in Arizona by an investigation from the Arizona Republic—but, the agency did not receive the funds needed to quickly shift to the care of newly wounded soldiers and Marines, and was an administrative backwater in 2001.

In 2001, the medical care budget was $27 billion and has grown roughly 130 percent to $176.9 billion for FY2017.

However, the VA will remain challenged by the vast number of wounded. The Congressional Budget office was noted that the number of veterans needing VA care grew by 100,000 per year, and the cost of treatment ranges from $40 billion to $55 billion per year.
 

Technarchy

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The VA has severe management problems, however, the agency has also been historically underfunded especially considering the vast number of wounded veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan.
"Severe management problems," is woefully inadequate of a description. Again, I really can't go into it, but just imagine the VA justifying one GS13 position by hiring 4 GS11's all at over 100k a year, with their job being editing about 10 characters in notepad a night. Now imagine hundreds of jobs like this all over the place

Don't tell me the VA is underfunded when thousands of people are making 100k and performing a job on par with the skill set of a kindergarten student.
 
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A.Goldberg

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As far as I understand there are a lot of management and funding issues with the VA. It's run like a typical government bureaucracy so resources are wasted, things happen slowly, etc. There are of course issues with adequate access to care.

Believe it or not, in many cases the VA statistically provides equal or in many cases even better quality of care than the private sector. You'd be surprised how average the outcomes are at many of the hospitals are "renowned status" have... yet they tend have higher statistics of "choosing to return" "recommending to a friend". This probably boils down to marketing and quality of facilities. The VA also created one of the most sophisticated electronic health records that has been paramount in retrospective health research. It also pretty much set the standard years ago for what other hospitals have just started adopting more recently.

While the VA has dismal wait times, unacceptable especially for our service men and women, the thing is they actually assess this information where a lot of hospitals don't. Wait time statistics are also distorted in the VA system if the patient wants to see the same doctor as their model isn't the same as most hospitals. They just expect you to wait or to go elsewhere. You might also notice that the number of increasing veterns has not been proportional to increasing healthcare worker levels, which probably comes down to a funding and management issue.

Every heath system has its issues. The VA is not alone. I've had negative experiences as a patient very good hospitals and know of some pretty ugly skeletons at some of America's best hospitals where I've worked.

Everyone desires the luxury more efficient healthcare with better outcomes. The VA certainly has issues to work on. I can't say if Trump hasn't made any improvements to that. I do know the VA has had a lot of bad press in the recent years, understandably, but the fact remains these are not issues particular to the VA and they continue to have impressive outcomes in many complex cases.

Probably the most important thing the VA could work on is rebuilding their management and firing the dead wood. They are top heavy and could better focus their money on expanding their healthcare force and facilities, especially in areas that are needed most.
 
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Technarchy

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As far as I understand there are a lot of management and funding issues with the VA. It's run like a typical government bureaucracy so resources are wasted, things happen slowly, etc. There are of course issues with adequate access to care.

Believe it or not, in many cases the VA statistically provides equal or in many cases even better quality of care than the private sector. You'd be surprised how average the outcomes are at many of the hospitals are "renowned status" have... yet they tend have higher statistics of "choosing to return" "recommending to a friend". This probably boils down to marketing and quality of facilities. The VA also created one of the most sophisticated electronic health records that has been paramount in retrospective health research. It also pretty much set the standard years ago for what other hospitals have just started adopting more recently.

While the VA has dismal wait times, unacceptable especially for our service men and women, the thing is they actually assess this information where a lot of hospitals don't. Wait time statistics are also distorted in the VA system if the patient wants to see the same doctor as their model isn't the same as most hospitals. They just expect you to wait or to go elsewhere. You might also notice that the number of increasing veterns has not been proportional to increasing healthcare worker levels, which probably comes down to a funding and management issue.

Every heath system has its issues. The VA is not alone. I've had negative experiences as a patient very good hospitals and know of some pretty ugly skeletons at some of America's best hospitals where I've worked.

Everyone desires the luxury more efficient healthcare with better outcomes. The VA certainly has issues to work on. I can't say if Trump hasn't made any improvements to that. I do know the VA has had a lot of bad press in the recent years, understandably, but the fact remains these are not issues particular to the VA and they continue to have impressive outcomes in many complex cases.

Probably the most important thing the VA could work on is rebuilding their management and firing the dead wood. They are top heavy and could better focus their money on expanding their healthcare force and facilities, especially in areas that are needed most.
I wouldn't recommend anyone go to the VA for anything. Place is a toilet. Further, I would discourage anyone from military service if they intend on using the VA as their PCP after getting out.

I'll never set foot in that place as a patient for anything. I'd eat the 10k deductible on the worst Obama care plan first.