New California declares 'independence' from California

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Jul 20, 2019.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #1
    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news...LvG44CSpdaJw6xeAnxQVfRddjUu9aS516p96fqXGspr5U
    God I hope it works
     
  2. Zenithal macrumors G3

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    #2
    It failed. Keep up with the news, JK.
     
  3. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #3
    Ha. Of course it did. Simple math.
     
  4. Solver macrumors 6502a

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    #4
    It looks like the capital of California is surrounded by the New Californians.
     
  5. blackfox, Jul 20, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019

    blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #6
    a tangent (and slightly dated too), but:
    The federal government of the United States has already established precedent for the forceful reunification of breakaway states with the union (cf. Lincoln v Davis, 1865), so the circumstances under which Oregon and Washington might have successfully joined such a republic are difficult to imagine. Canada is a looser confederation that periodically must deal with wrong-headed separatist governments in Quebec, so BC's peaceful secession is perhaps a bit easier to contemplate. But it is still difficult to imagine why it would want to.

    In any case, OP asked what would happen if the Republic of Cascadia were to magically arise, and so the above questions are sort of besides the point. So let's assume that the magic did its thing, Cascadia became an independent republic, and neither the US nor Canada put down the secession attempts. What might it look like?


    Let's start with what it would look like on Day 1. [1]

    Federal Republic of Cascadia (Fr., République fédérale de Cascadie)

    [​IMG]

    General Information

    • Capital: Seattle Federal Administrative District
    • Population: 15,271,000
    • Land area: 1,365,000 km^2
    • Government type: Federal parliamentary republic
    • Official languages: English (99.9999999%), French (0.0%)
    • Administrative regions: North Cascadia (formerly British Columbia), Huskyland (formerly Washington state), Duckland (formerly Oregon)
    • International borders: Canada to the North and East (Northwest Territories, Alberta); United States of America to the Northwest (Alaska), East (Idaho) and South (Nevada, California)
    [​IMG]
    • Membership in international organizations: British Commonwealth (since 2015); United Nations (since 2015); Organization of American States (since 2015); International Committee of the Red Cross (since 2015); North American Free Trade Agreement (pending); World Trade Organization (pending); Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (2015); Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development (pending)

    Economic Data

    • GDP in USD (2014): $754.2 billion (19th in the world, below the Netherlands and above Saudi Arabia)
    • GDP per capita (nominal): $49,386 (11th in the world, below Canada and above Austria)
    • Currency: the Cascade (ISO code: CCD) - Value pegged to a basket of the CAD and USD
    • Natural resources: Extensive reserves of lumber and minerals, fisheries, as well as abundant arable land suitable for wine, produce and, in the eastern parts of North Cascadia, ranching
    • Key industries: High technology, retail, forestry/natural resources/mining, aerospace & defense, agriculture, energy, real estate, tourism
    • Key trading partners: (1) USA; (2) Canada; (3) China; (4) European Union; (5) Japan

    Economy
    So, as you can see, the independent Republic of Cascadia is quite a wealthy, well-diversified economy. Many of the world's most recognizable companies are headquartered in Cascadia, particularly in the two southern regions of Duckland and Huskyland: Microsoft, Amazon.com, Nike, Nordstrom, Costco. Many other industries, including aerospace/defense, high tech and biotechology, have very significant research or manufacturing presences clustered in and around both the capital district of Seattle, and Vancouver, the economic center of North Cascadia.

    This is in large part due to a well-educated, highly productive work force and a legal system that is considered somewhat friendly to corporations with a high proportion of white collar workers. Huskyland, however, is experiencing a rapid decline in manufacturing jobs, as Boeing, a large American defense concern, has shifted most of its heavy industry to America. The Obama administration, both in deference to its unionized constituents and because of national security concerns, has pressured the company to close down much of its old presence in Seattle and relocate to Illinois. This has caused certain areas of Seattle to decay.

    Political independence from Washington DC has, however, proven to be a boon for Cascadia's robust technology industry. Companies both foreign and homegrown have sprung up to take advantage of the country's young and tech-savvy work force; a small, but highly experienced venture capital community has underwritten much of the innovation in Cascadian startup companies; most of the foreign investment in Cascadia's tech firms comes from the US state of California, which borders Duckland to the south and has a much larger and deeper venture capital market.

    Amazon and Microsoft, two of the world's largest tech firms, have benefited from being able to assuage foreign customers' worries about data privacy. and many foreign companies, like Google Inc., Facebook and Oracle have chosen Cascadia to build data centers, capitalizing on tax breaks and North Cascadia's cold, drenching climate to reduce energy costs from cooling. Cascadian independence has also had the effect of tamping down global concerns about an "American-dominated" internet: Much of the internet's infrastructure is now maintained in a country which, although friendly with America, has staunchly opposed the US National Security Agency's electronic surveillance programs. Indeed, Cascadia's sitting Prime Minister, Ron Wyden (who hails from Duckland), was the US Senator who spearheaded congressional resistance to these schemes.

    Society
    On the political front, Cascadia is, as you might imagine, rather a progressive country in the same vein as the Nordic countries or the Netherlands. Upon independence, the marijuana trade was legalized and regulated, marriage equality was instituted throughout the country, the old USA's misguided attempts to combat narcotics in a "war on drugs" was dropped, and the social safety net was significantly expanded.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The latter of these measures was made necessary in part because while North Cascadia had been one of the most prosperous Canadian provinces, both Huskyland and Duckland had in fact been net importers of tax revenue from the US federal government. Some of this was due to the defense industry's presence in Huskyland, but most of it was due to programs like Medicaid, Welfare, Social Security and VA benefits; with the evaporation of these federal outlays, the two southern regions' middle and working classes suffered a bit. To combat this problem, early in 2015, Prime Minister Wyden, with surprising political backing from luminaries such as Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates and Phil Knight, pushed a bill through the House of Commons that raised tax revenues and established a single nationwide health insurance plan, but did away with quite a bit of regulation and totally eliminated import duties. The bill itself is nothing extraordinary, but in the long term it would became symbolic of the new Cascadian nation's relationship with business: As in Scandinavia, Cascadia's government and companies embrace a concept of "stakeholders" value, recognizing that companies' responsibilities extend beyond simply a fiduciary responsibility to shareholders to include labor, the environment, government and the rest of society. Most Cascadians openly acknowledge the benefits of living in a business-friendly welfare state, and do not feel that this impinges unduly on their personal or economic freedoms.

    Despite their mostly leftist bent, in a constitutional convention, the people of Cascadia voted to protect the right to bear arms. There were three main reasons for this. First, much of Cascadia--just like much of Canada and America--are rural areas with little or no police protection, and large populations of dangerous animals. Second, Cascadia's long history of outdoors lifestyle and hunting meant that there were many guns already within the territory, and thus confiscatory laws were deemed impractical and unjust. Indeed, Cascadia would become an important export market for American and European gun-makers, and a prime destination for hunters from around the world seeking moose, deer, bear and wolf (the latter having been reintroduced by the previous Canadian government, much to the dismay of North Cascadia's ranchers).

    Among the few nasty traits that society in southern Cascadia inherited from its American heritage is a sharp divide between urban progressives and suburban and
    rural conservatives. When Huskyland belonged to the US, for example, it was possible to drive a few hours east of Seattle and encounter communities where the old Rebel flag was proudly displayed (although Washington itself had not been around during America's Civil War); upon secession, this defiance continued, with some defiant Huskylanders swapping the Stars & Bars for the Stars and Stripes.

    [​IMG]

    [The US flag with 50 stars rather than 48, a symbol of resistance to the Cascadian federation]

    Support for the Ancien Regime in Duckland and Huskyland remains high in certain places, and in some cases, particularly the east and south, many people think of themselves not as Cascadians, but as Americans. For the time being, these communities feel adequately served by their representation in parliament in Seattle, but only time will tell if their American identity can remain subordinate to loyalty to Cascadia.

    Military & International Relations
    Upon secession, Cascadia inherited formerly American military installations at Ft. Lewis and Bremerton, Huskyland. As a result, it became the third-largest nuclear power on Earth, with roughly 1,000 nuclear warheads deployed aboard 8 ballistic-missile submarines (more than the USA proper). In addition, Cascadia inherited Carrier Strike Group 3, comprising USS John C. Stennis and supporting surface vessels, and a powerful submarine force including all three of the US Navy's Seawolf-class nuclear attack submarines.

    [​IMG]

    [CFNS John C. Stennis, the largest ship in the Cascadian Federal Navy]

    On land, Cascadia inherited a very powerful mechanized force comprising the US Army I Corps. Certain units based at Ft. Lewis were deployed abroad at the time of secssion, in places as varied as Afghanistan, South Korea, Japan, and Germany; Seattle declared, however, that it would not be party to Washington DC's military commitments, however, and so these Lewis-based units were repatriated immediately.

    Soon after independence, Cascadia came under considerable pressure from the international community to get rid of its nuclear weapons. Because the Cascadian Constitution requires that all matters relating to military deployments, security and trade be ratified by popular referendum, the issue of denuclearization of the Pacific Northwest was put to a vote. The Cascadian people voted overwhelmingly to dispose of their nuclear weapons; but rather than turn them over to the original owner, the United States, the referendum's organizers stipulated that the weapons had to be destroyed. This was done in due course and today the country is a signatory to the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty, pledging never to build, obtain or use nuclear weapons, and allowing for international inspection of its nuclear power generation facilities. Although much of the Cascadian Federal Navy is nuclear-powered, it has been decided that these capital ships will be leased for 20 years from the US Navy, after which they will revert to American possession. The Cascadian government's latest defense white paper has set forth requirements for a modest-sized military, with some focus on peacekeeping efforts around the globe, and supplemented at home by an armed citizen militia modeled after that of Switzerland. [2]

    On the global stage, Cascadia tends to align itself with wealthy, trade-dependent rich countries such as Sweden, Belgium, Switzerland and the Netherlands, and places high emphasis on human rights advocacy. Cascadia's large and liberally-minded community of Hong Kong and Mainland Chinese ex-pats (concentrated in wealthy districts of Vancouver) are frequently critical of China, which sometimes causes diplomatic problems. Generally, however, these frictions don't interfere with trade relations: China is heavily dependent on Cascadian goodwill to ensure the flow of Canadian and American timber, fertilizer, coal, natural gas and metals from the interior to the large export terminals in Vancouver and Seattle.

    What the Future Holds
    Cascadian prosperity and peace are largely a result of the peaceful secession process it underwent. The progressive nature of Cascadia's society is thanks largely to its economic prosperity, which is built on both abundant natural resources, and many decades' worth of human capital formed through skilled industries. This, in turn, has been possible in no small part thanks to Huskyland and Duckland's previous membership in the United States of America, whose government invests significant resources in infrastructure, law enforcement, court systems and other services to support its constituent states; the US government is also the single largest underwriter of scientific research anywhere on the planet. It is unclear, then, whether the nearly-utopic prosperity of Cascadia could continue without maintaining very close links to America, financially and politically. If America were to impose duties on Cascadian goods and services, for example, Cascadia's economy would suffer significant damage. If Cascadia were to become a high-tax overly restrictive environment for multinational corporations, it is almost certain that the country's standard of living would fall dramatically--America and Canada are right next door, after all, and as a former CEO of ExxonMobil once infamously remarked, businesses do not have nationalities.




     
  6. Plutonius macrumors 604

    Plutonius

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    #7
  7. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #8
    An earthquake has a better chance of dividing the state.
     
  8. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #9
    lets do it :p
     
  9. jerwin macrumors 68020

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    #10
  10. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #11
    yeah, I missed it :(
     
  11. ThisBougieLife macrumors 68000

    ThisBougieLife

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    #12
    This reminds me of Tim Draper’s plan to split the state into six states. Twelve senate seats for California—imagine :D

    If you don’t like it here in California, you can leave and go back to where you came from ;)
     
  12. Solomani macrumors 68040

    Solomani

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    #13
    Exactly. That's what Rump would say too. LOL
     
  13. raqball macrumors 68000

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    #14
    A lot of peeps are di di mau'ing from the joint.....
     
  14. FrankieTDouglas macrumors 65816

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  15. Solomani macrumors 68040

    Solomani

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  16. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #17
    Personally I think PR has a better chance of statehood, and there not going to be happy with how the GOP treated them after Hurricane Maria....
     

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16 July 20, 2019