New Drug to Boost Women's Sex Drive

Plutonius

macrumors 604
Original poster
Feb 22, 2003
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New Hampshire, USA
A drug company just released a new drug to increase a women sex drive.

It's a shot that's good for several hours and it comes with typical drug side affects.

I wonder what the demand for it will be seeing most insurance doesn't cover it and it's said to be expensive.

I doubt it will replace alcohol :).
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,667
1,738
I'm sorry, am I having a stroke or is this just misandry to the extreme?
I think it's mostly snark in response to the OP's comment regarding alcohol.

I did notice this, which amused me. I imagine people still think drugs like Viagra target libido rather than blood flow. It's nonsense though. Some of these drugs end up being quite dangerous, and I hope that doesn't turn out to be the case here.

Amag’s campaign has some of the hallmarks that helped launch the first female libido drug, Addyi, a once-a-day pill approved in 2015. The FDA decision followed a contentious four-year review that included a lobbying effort funded by Addyi’s maker, Sprout Pharmaceuticals, which framed the lack of female sex drugs as a women’s rights issue.
 

A.Goldberg

macrumors 68020
Jan 31, 2015
2,325
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Boston
Vyleesi aka bremelanotide seems to be an interesting drug. On the surface this appears to have more potential than Addyi which was touted colloquially as the “female viagra” (in reality it’s an overpriced and sh**** antidepressant that you have to take daily and can’t drink alcohol with with highly questionable efficacy... it’s laughable the FDA approved it. Frankly I think it was largely approved due to social pressure stemming from sex equality than actual scientific support).

This however is a bit different. Bremelanotide has been sold as a research drug online for years under the designation PT-141 for years and been used by men due to its erectogenic effects. The clinical trial data for Vyleesi, which is only approved for use in women, doesn’t exactly have thrilling results having skimmed through the results. In a study of nearly 1200 women 25% had an increase in their reported libido score, however 17% reported the same in the placebo group. 35% reported being less distressed while 31% in the placebo group reported the same. Furthermore, 40% of the women taking the drug reported nausea as a side effect and nearly 20% dropped out due to this. 20% had flushing and >10% had headaches. Lastly, the medication must be injected making it less than ideal.

“Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder” is a controversial diagnosis, especially considering every expert who consulted to formulate its definition worked for Sprout pharmaceuticals, the creator of Addyi, which was the first drug designed to treat HSDD (or presumably the other way around). I think there needs to be some thought about the social ramifications as labeling low libido as a medical condition.

My biggest concern with this drug is safety. The long term effects haven’t really been looked at. The study above was only a number of weeks long. This isn’t supposed to be used regularly (max 8x per month), but that’s always subject to change. Bremelanotide was actually discovered through Melanotan I and II research, which were products designed to pharmaceutically induce a tan. It turns out they also caused weight loss and increased libido... as well induce cancer. There are other related substances (melanocortin agonists) also found to have major health risks.

I suppose for women (and potentially men eventually if FDA approval is sought) Vyleesi could be beneficial to those truly suffering by the loss of libido. No word yet on cost or how it will be packaged (how many doses per month). You can bet it will be expensive considering there is no alternative, it’s injected therefore must be sterile, and it’ll likely use an auto injector to administer. It’ll be interesting to see if insurance covers this.
 
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Plutonius

macrumors 604
Original poster
Feb 22, 2003
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New Hampshire, USA
Don’t tell my wife, I can’t keep up with her as it is.
Al Bundy in Married with Children :).


Vyleesi aka bremelanotide seems to be an interesting drug. On the surface this appears to have more potential than Addyi which was touted colloquially as the “female viagra” (in reality it’s an overpriced and sh**** antidepressant that you have to take daily and can’t drink alcohol with with highly questionable efficacy... it’s laughable the FDA approved it. Frankly I think it was largely approved due to social pressure stemming from sex equality than actual scientific support).

This however is a bit different. Bremelanotide has been sold as a research drug online for years under the designation PT-141 for years and been used by men due to its erectogenic effects. The clinical trial data for Vyleesi, which is only approved for use in women, doesn’t exactly have thrilling results having skimmed through the results. In a study of nearly 1200 women 25% had an increase in their reported libido score, however 17% reported the same in the placebo group. 35% reported being less distressed while 31% in the placebo group reported the same. Furthermore, 40% of the women taking the drug reported nausea as a side effect and nearly 20% dropped out due to this. 20% had flushing and >10% had headaches. Lastly, the medication must be injected making it less than ideal.

“Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder” is a controversial diagnosis, especially considering every expert who consulted to formulate its definition worked for Sprout pharmaceuticals, the creator of Addyi, which was the first drug designed to treat HSDD (or presumably the other way around). I think there needs to be some thought about the social ramifications as labeling low libido as a medical condition.

My biggest concern with this drug is safety. The long term effects haven’t really been looked at. The study above was only a number of weeks long. This isn’t supposed to be used regularly (max 8x per month), but that’s always subject to change. Bremelanotide was actually discovered through Melanotan I and II research, which were products designed to pharmaceutically induce a tan. It turns out they also caused weight loss and increased libido... as well induce cancer. There are other related substances (melanocortin agonists) also found to have major health risks.

I suppose for women (and potentially men eventually if FDA approval is sought) Vyleesi could be beneficial to those truly suffering by the loss of libido. No word yet on cost or how it will be packaged (how many doses per month). You can bet it will be expensive considering there is no alternative, it’s injected therefore must be sterile, and it’ll likely use an auto injector to administer. It’ll be interesting to see if insurance covers this.
Good explanation. It doesn't sound like insurance would cover it.
 
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