Not a Trump thread!! Billionaire Mark Cuban: The Rise of Technology Will Cause a Lot of Unemployment

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by juanm, Jul 23, 2017.

  1. juanm, Jul 23, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2017

    juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #1
    https://www.thestreet.com/story/142...ing-our-ass-with-artificial-intelligence.html

    Cuban touched upon artificial intelligence:

    "However much change you saw over the past ten years with the iPhone, that's nothing," Cuban continued. Cuban also claims that Montreal and China are "kicking our ass" with artificial intelligence.

    Cuban also expressed concern about technology usurping the current standard of everyday business practices, leaving many unemployed.

    "There's going to be a lot of unemployed people replaced with technology and if we don't start dealing with that now, we're going to have some real problems," said Cuban.
     
  2. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #2
    Think he's right here. Chinese govt is investing heavy in AI and even though many of the top universities are in the US, alot of them are heading back with these new skills.
     
  3. fitshaced macrumors 68000

    fitshaced

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    #3
    Guaranteed livable income is the future. Yeahy! Free money.
     
  4. localoid, Jul 23, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2017

    localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #4
    Many have brought this subject up before, but few are willing to plan for filing tomorrow's job openings in a realistic manner, as it's much easier to simply do things like promising to bring back coal mining jobs.
     
  5. fitshaced macrumors 68000

    fitshaced

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    #5
    Yes I agree. What's interesting is that as a country like the US move to automation/AI in the workplace, the more emigration they will see to other countries who still have the traditional jobs. The US or China could be the first to suffer from the uncontrolled push for automation. I wouldn't try and get in the way of its progress but there does need to be a strategy on dealing with it.
     
  6. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    At the risk of repeating myself:

    Arthur C. Clarke once said the goal of the future is full unemployment, so we can play. He was speaking in theoretical, utopian terms reserved for some far distant future, but at the rate we're going, that distant future seems just a little bit closer...

    ...if, that is, we can figure out how to get there. Whether or not that world actually comes to pass, futurists will first have to figure out how we earn money and provide for ourselves in an economy that needs fewer jobs and/or fewer hours doing those jobs.

    In a country with a stubborn corporate base, a useless Congress and a "president" who doesn't have the intellectual curiosity to look outside to see if it's raining, I don't see that happening. Rather than proactively planning for the future, we'll do what we always do: let ourselves get buffeted around by change, and then belatedly react.
     
  7. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    #7
    If''s a big word man.

    Cuban is right.
     
  8. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #8
    THIS!!!!! We are not a society of preparation, but of adjusting(which is usually an initial hardship).
     
  9. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #9
    Sounds dull.
     
  10. Fancuku macrumors 6502a

    Fancuku

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    #10
    The left has now a new hero. Cuban 4 prez!
     
  11. DearthnVader macrumors 6502

    DearthnVader

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    #11
    Anyone remember the 1980's, the computer was the pet rock, it took the internet to really make the PC useful to the masses, but having computers has not lead to mass unemployment.

    The more work you do, the more work there is to be done. Who is going to design, manufacture, and maintain a fleet of drones that "Does all our work for us".

    The day may come when we have some sort of robot we can have do all of the things we do, or most of them, but I think it is a lot further out than 10 years. A human being is an amazing machine, not that easy to replace.

    I'd be more worried about clones, or cyborgs.
     
  12. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    Fine for those with degrees. Not for those without.
     
  13. DearthnVader macrumors 6502

    DearthnVader

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    #13
    You're assuming it's going to be more cost effective to replace the fry cook, than it is those in middle management. I don't think that's the case at all, plus, I will point out, that we need a shift in our public education system. We really still have a system that is meant to produce people that fit into the manufacturing model of the last century.
     
  14. Zenithal Suspended

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    #14
    Removing those in higher echelons of work requires extensive computer learning. Which even a decade plus into the field, it's still not remotely where we thought we'd be.
     
  15. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #15
    got a feeling the population is going to see a "trim" when push comes to shove :eek:
     
  16. DrewDaHilp1 macrumors 6502a

    DrewDaHilp1

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    And taking defense research with them.
     
  17. LordVic macrumors 601

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    #17
    this is a little disingenous. WHile workplace makeup will shift and there will be some new jobs, the net result will still be loss.

    the problem is, that for every job created by automation, that automation itself is replacing many people, if not multiple, it's not a 1:1 scenario. For example, when robotics starting taking over automobile manufacturing, yes, there were people hired to mantain the robots. But there wasn't 1 person for every robot.

    already going forward, today's automation is software. And already in many fields we're seeing catastrophic decrease in job demand due to automation.

    Heck, I work for fintech and the software we create essentially replaces an entire room of traders with 1 person. This si the direction automation is going to go. it's not just the fast fry cook. In fact, they're probably "safer" right now than most of the middleware jobs. the ones in Finance, administration, and anything that does number crunching for a living is going to find themselves replaced in the next decade by software automation.
     
  18. DearthnVader macrumors 6502

    DearthnVader

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    #18
    What do you want the government to do about it, should we protect jobs in the "Whale Oil" industry?
     
  19. LordVic macrumors 601

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    #19
    not at all. Jobs come and go. however, failing to recognize that with automation there's going to be even less jobs for more people is going come to a head eventually.

    Some will be able to pivot and change their lifes direction to find work in these new industries. But many will not for a variety of reasons (their own or societal).

    I don't have a solution for this myself. Other than "universal basic income" and a welfare state.
     
  20. Rhonindk macrumors 68020

    Rhonindk

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    #20
    Fry Cook.jpg
    Hmmm......
     
  21. MC6800 macrumors 6502

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    #21
    In 1910, 30% of workers were in farm occupations. It's now around 1%. It was mechanization (for the most part) that took away their jobs. Why don't we have masses of out-of-work farmers in the streets? Or phone operators, check sorters, and typesetters? New jobs came, even entire new sectors were formed. Someone in 1910 couldn't have guessed at many jobs we have now, just as we can't expect to foresee what jobs will come along. But they always do.
     
  22. Rhonindk macrumors 68020

    Rhonindk

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    Short term, mid term, and long term visibility. Or guesses.
    I for one could never have envisioned my Nuclear Engineering > Business Admin > Programming/dba > ERP > Compliance/Regulatory skill path as the environment changed.
     
  23. LordVic macrumors 601

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    Except, following that mechanization also brought the great depression, which saw unemployment numbers in the U.S. of 25-35%, and we have never seen the engagement in employment return.

    While "unemployment" might be < 7%, the unemployment number also doesn't account for those who aren't actively seeking work.

    And unfortunately, when you look at modern stats for employment ratio, the USA is currently showing < 70% of it's population is actually working.

    Yes. New industries open up as time goes on. But there's always going to be several years / decades gap for those new careers/professions to really blossom, education for them to be defined, and then for people to traverse through to get there.

    and when you look at USA's current 67.4% employment rate (2013 is last update I can find), the US is lower than many other 1st work nations. and unfortunately, since 2000 that % keeps declining. (it was a high of 74.1 in 2000)

    So despite automation, and other efficiencies reducing work, the USA has not seemed to be able to turn around and find those new jobs / careers to move into
     
  24. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #24
    That was then and this is now. To better understand the difference between automation of 100 years ago brought about by the steam engine and the smart-automation of the future via AI and machine-learning you'd learn more from reading scholarly research by futurists and think tanks rather than history books on the Industrial Revolution.

    At the risk of bursting your bubble, society's biggest concerns about future jobs doesn't center around just you.
     
  25. MC6800 macrumors 6502

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    #25
    There certainly have been large swings in unemployment in the past, larger than swings today, and there were clearly other factors besides mechanization involved in the Great Depression. But it's difficult to compare workforce percentages with 1910, since there are now 3 times as many people over 65, and the percentage of women has gone from 23% to 57%, among many other changes.

    Yes, the job market is ever in flux. Nothing new there.

    There are factors other than automation involved here, so it's not clear cut. Automation has been increasing for a number of decades now, including both rises and falls in US employment.
     

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