NRA releases NRA: Practice Range iPhone app

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by bradl, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #1
    Given the gun control issue in the US recently, there would be no way that this would stay civilized in the main forum, so I'm putting this directly into PRSI so we won't have to worry about it.

    The NRA just released a new iPhone App, called "NRA: Practice Range". It should be available in the App Store now. While there is absolutely nothing violent about the app, as it has 3 different types of practice ranges: indoor, outdoor, and skeet shooting, plus tries to educate users about gun safety with tips and facts. Again, in my honest opinion nothing wrong there.

    What I think is the problem, is that the app appears to be targeted for users aged four and above. Yes: geared toward 4 and above. CultofMac and Appside have more info on the app.

    The debate here should simply be this: Parental controls aside, should we really be gearing apps like this and guns towards a target audience that isn't even in school yet? That seems rather tactless, especially given Sandy Hook..

    BL.
     
  2. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #2
    My honest opinion you can never start to early with gun safety, and as you point out there is nothing violent about the app.

    If Sandy Hook hadn't happened we would never have heard of this app, I think.
     
  3. edk99 macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    It is never to early to learn about the birds and bees and guns.

    Anyway WHO rates the application? The NRA or APPLE? I would think the NRA might of submitted it with a 4+ but I would think Apple would have to approve that 4+ rating would you think?
     
  4. PracticalMac macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    #4
    Given the current climate, it should have been all about safety (and I completely approve more safety education).

    This "Annie get y'r gun" attitudes just makes it easier to vilify them. Not that they are doing a grand job of being an easy target.
     
  5. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

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    #5
    We have shooter apps and games, and people let their children play them well outside the recommended age ranges, and they do so without fear of penalty.

    So I think this is at worst just more of the same.

    At least on this app there's no violence. And if it has any instructive value about proper and safe handling of firearms it's probably worth showing to any young kids who are going to be in a household with firearms.

    Edit: I looked it up and if it's the app from the screenshot I attached it's called NRA: Practice Range and is published by MEDL Mobile not the NRA directly, and it does look to have some gun safety tips.
     

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  6. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #6
    I agree. This should be completely about education and safety. I mean, even back in the 50s and 60s with every children's show having some type of gun on it (Lone Ranger, Wild Bill, etc.), kids were taught the difference between a play one and a real one, and in addition, taught the difference between right and wrong about them and their use.

    But a lot of that the NRA has also brought on themselves, especially when they entered the world of politics. In that aspect, everything is fair game.

    As far as the app goes, like I said, I have no problem with it, except for the minimum age. I mean, kids at 4 barely know how to tie their shoes, and a gun app and education on about a gun is more important? Again, I say that this is where the parent comes in and should be teaching them first about what it is before giving them a game to learn about it on their own. Again, the whole "raising kids" vs. "placating kids" issue.

    Not entirely so. With what you are mentioning, it is the parents letting their children play it outside recommended ages. With this, the app is geared toward that age. Big difference.

    BL.
     
  7. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

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    #7
    Believe me, I hear what you are saying. But isn't the end result basically the same? I'm not saying that we should use other people's laziness and ineptitude as parents to justify lowering societal standards, but ultimately even if it gets a 17+ rating, many folks are going to just pass the phone to their 3 year old crying in the back seat of the car so he/she will shut up. I don't pretend that ratings mean much of anything anymore.

    Plus, as has already been mentioned, this app seems to be all about safety and proper handling. Which might just be valuable to a 4 year old in a home with guns present.
     
  8. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #8
    Unfortunately, I agree with you there, especially if they those parents don't have a separate iPhone or iPod Touch that has the kids' games on it and only the ones the parents approve.

    If the parents let them have it, then shame on the parents; unfortunately, we can't Leroy Jethro Gibbs-slap them upside the head to get them to raise their kids better.

    Fair enough. It may just be the parent in me coming out, but it scares me ****less to envision a 4-year old carrying around a gun. Even if it were old-school Megatron. In fact, I've seen that happen, and the boy in question is two years older than mine. I've never seen so much anger in a child; it scares and saddens me.

    BL.
     
  9. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

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    #9
    Again, I hear you there. I've got 3 of my own and we don't allow toy guns or violent games/videos of any type.

    We have no guns in our home, and while I'd be interested in getting a handgun for self defense while fishing, and for target shooting (it's a lot of fun), my wife would never hear of it. So our children, and parenting style is probably not a lot different than yours in this regard.

    But my uncle is as close to what I'd call a "cowboy" as possible. He lives in a rural town of about 200 in middle of nowhere out west, works as a prison guard and cuts wood for supplemental income. He has horses, dogs, chickens, and probably sheep (haven't visited for a while). He hunts year round too. As a result of this he has, and always has had, a lot of guns in the home. He also has multiple kids (my cousins) who grew up around guns. He swears that it was early shooting range time, teaching, and an overall "de-mystification" of guns that made it so his kids don't really see them as anything overly special or exciting. They are well aware of what a gun can do (having already shot their fair share of animals) and as a result they don't have the same curiosity that a child that has guns hidden and kept away from them might have.

    My uncle says that it's really important that anytime a new gun was brought into the home, they went out and shot it and got any curiosity answered very quickly. And his kids were trained early on how to properly handle, and use firearms. This was directly related to their way of life though, and wouldn't necessarily make sense for someone like me who lives in the city and can't just head to the hills whenever I want to.
     
  10. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #10
    Funnily enough, you've described my father, with the exception of the horses, chickens, dogs and sheep. he was born and raised in the country in Oklahoma, lives in OKC, but still has that "country boy" mentality". We still have our farm out in the country as well, so that definitely contributes to it. I was born in the city and away from that, so I was always bored with life out there, like you.

    Question.. how young were your cousins when your uncle showed/taught them about guns? I'm asking this in regards to knowing right from wrong in a child's sense, especially for one, say, 6 and younger, when they barely know how to tie their shoes.

    BL.
     
  11. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

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    #11
    That I don't really know, as I grew up in the city about 3 hours away and rarely made it down to visit as a kid. Plus, these cousins are about my age so I probably wouldn't remember anyway. But I'd suspect that they were around guns from the time they could walk and be trusted to not run out in-front of the gun range etc. At least that's the general story we got when I accompanied my brother down to my uncle's place for an Elk hunt a few years ago (I was shooting with a DSLR and a telephoto lens).
     
  12. PracticalMac macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    #12
    I think organizations can be politically involved without vilifying anyone, let alone being total ******s. But that's another debate.

    A gun safety app for young children could be to identify it, why its dangerous, how to disable it (throw in water, for instance) and the like. Especially for parents that might not have resources to do it themselves.
    Also minor difference to what you say.
     
  13. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #13
    Once again, I agree. But I'll be a bit more direct:

    Really? 4 years old and above? 4 years old? That's the part that bothers me.

    BL.
     
  14. PracticalMac macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    #14
    4 year olds are large enough and strong enough to pick up a handgun, and curious enough to start flipping leavers and pulling triggers.

    Knowing what a gun is, why it is dangerous (that is make a big boo boo, not get detailed), and if they have to disable it (put in toilet, for instance).

    OH!! Now I think I understand where u coming from.
    I am not talking anything like the app described, something completely different.
     
  15. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #15
    I thought the NRA was blaming video games? So what does the app classify as?
     
  16. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #16
    Good point. This would be a huge pot/kettle/black situation for the NRA.

    BL.
     
  17. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #17
    I am shocked that Apple would approve the app just a month after Sandy Hook. This from a company that dropped the fart app because it was offensive.
     
  18. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

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    #18
    I've been meaning to comment on the shooting portion of this game (I have already commented on the positive nature of the gun safety tips).

    The only major difference (and I think it's significant) between this and the games the NRA has targeted (pun intended), is that this game doesn't involve indiscriminately mowing down human beings. Shooting paper targets isn't what anyone would call "wanton violence".

    That being said, I don't think young kids should be playing games where they shoot guns at all. Kids often want to repeat the things they do in games, so if they see a real gun, they may try to shoot it. I can imagine some 4 year old thinking: "It's fun in the iPhone game, why wouldn't it be fun in real life?"

    So I don't think the game is something I'd let my five year old play. I'm not even sure I'd be comfortable with my kids playing a target shooting game like this at all, no matter the age. It sends the wrong message IMO; shooting guns is not a game.

    Now if I had a gun in the home, you can bet I'd have my kids out learning how to properly handle it, and learn to respect it as a dangerous tool if handled or used improperly. And of course i'd have all the necessary security measures in-place (trigger locks, gun safe, no ammo stored with the gun etc). But I don't have guns in the home so that's not something I have to concern myself with so much.
     
  19. Hawkeye16 macrumors regular

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    #19
    It is not created by the NRA as said already. It is created by MEDL MOBILE Games. Just because it uses the NRA facts and safety tips and resources does not mean that they created it.

    edit: I guess they did License it... oh well. I personally do not see a need for any age restrictions for an instructive safety app.
     
  20. GermanyChris macrumors 601

    GermanyChris

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    #20
    I was shooting my first gun at 4. It was a single shot rifle that shot 22 shorts. I was built in the 40's and was always the kids gun my cousins and I all leaned on it as well as my father an uncles.

    I let my daughter have toy guns but she's not allowed to point the at people, it frustrated her because the other kids can and do.
     
  21. FX120 macrumors 65816

    FX120

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    #21
    I don't see the problem...
     

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  22. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #22
    Imagine your 3 - 4 year old kid with that gun and still not knowing the sense of right and wrong to point that gun at you or perhaps his 18-month old sister.

    If you don't see that problem, then you probably are not a parent yet.

    BL.
     
  23. GermanyChris macrumors 601

    GermanyChris

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    #23
    but he's pointing it down range..

    Imagine if I walked outside tomorrow and got hit by the snow plow, if you don't se the problem you must not be a pedestrian.
     
  24. FX120 macrumors 65816

    FX120

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    #24
    I took that photo, that's my friend's son who I have gone shooting with on multiple occasions.

    He is responsible, knows all the safety rules, and isn't left unsupervised. If I felt unsafe around him, I wouldn't be there.
     
  25. bradl thread starter macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #25
    I'm not talking about the person in the picture. I'm talking about your 4 year old child with a gun. BIG difference. Imagine your 4 year old, gun in hand, pointing it at someone, and you are saying that that doesn't scare or shock you in the least?!?

    If not, your parental skills definitely would come into question.

    Again, I'm not talking about the boy in the picture. I'm talking about visioning your 4-year old child with a gun. Does that thought bother you? It should.

    BL.
     

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