NSA wants "Front Door Access" on every computer

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacNut, Apr 13, 2015.

  1. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #1
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world...1c7518-d401-11e4-a62f-ee745911a4ff_story.html
    So instead of spying on us in secret they want to openly look at everything we are doing.

    I want to know how they got information before the internet age. It didn't stop them in the past, why would a fully locked down internet stop them now?
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #2
    Well, as long as they don't want to come through the backdoor ...

    But at the very least I'd expect them to take us out to dinner before.
     
  3. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #3
    They would most likely stick you with the bill. They would rip up the constitution if they had their way.
     
  4. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #4
    If this becomes either regulation or law then the U.S. Constitution is torn up for all intents and purposes.

    It's depressing that the White House is considering this. One would expect a "constitutional scholar" like Obama to dismiss it out of hand.
     
  5. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #5
    I'll give them front door access.


    ...


    Here's a point at which one of those "constitutional candidate" poseurs could actually break from the pack and decry this nonsense, but I suspect the silence will be deafening.

    I also think this should be a warning. We once thought that candidate Obama, a former constitutional scholar would protect us from the PATRIOT Act. What does this mean for the pseudo-libertarians running in the GOP?
     
  6. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #6
    Supposedly Rand Paul is against the NSA spying, but even if he gets elected we know what good their campaign word is.

    So far none of them have lived up to their promises.
     
  7. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #7
    If someone was a criminal or terrorist mastermind, running a network of international drug smugglers and saboteurs, and keeping their records on a smartphone - doesn't this simply mean that they would simply keep those records on a "legacy" machine - one that lacked this handy "front door" key?

    I suppose it could be justified if the "front door" required the investigating body needed to have physical possession of the machine in question. If the FBI or the CIA seized a piece of equipment (with a warrant where necessary) then I don't think it unreasonable that - with appropriate probable cause - that investigators be able to examine it fully.

    The problem is, of course, that this country's intelligence and law enforcement agencies have gotten remarkably good at spying by remote control. And moreover, putting pretty much every user of the telecommunications network through a vast, secret, and unknowable filter.

    That is not something that is going to be acceptable. Not to the citizens of this or most any other country. And I doubt sincerely that its going to be acceptable to the large multinational corporations that now design and build our computers and phones.

    DOA.
     
  8. The Doctor11 macrumors 603

    The Doctor11

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    #8
    If your going to require companies to build these "locks and keys" the NSA better be paying labor.
     
  9. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #9
    That's really my point. Paul might make some noise in this direction, but I don't think he's more serious than Clinton in this regard because terrorism has become the root password to the U.S.C.

    Even so, the clever bunnies at the NSA (et. al.) collect so much data already that they can't handle it. Giving them more access isn't just illegal and wrong, it will probably just swamp the agency with more information.

    And, really they don't need it as the agency has really co-opted most encryption, hacked the manufacture of SIM cards, and generally run amok in telecommunications.

    Yet, they can't pinpoint two ding dongs in Boston planning to attack the marathon nor can they predict the rise of ISIS.
     
  10. MacNut thread starter macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #10
    That is the real breakdown, they claim that another attack hasn't happened but they didn't stop Boston or ISIS. Plus the FBI was tracking them. So either they are still not sharing information or they are just inept.

    They could not stop Snowden from stealing all the secrets, how can we expect them to keep our secrets safe when they would have a master key to our data.
     
  11. chown33 macrumors 604

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    #11
    Riiiight. Because that worked so well before:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipper_chip
    The Clipper chip was a chipset that was developed and promoted by the United States National Security Agency[1] (NSA) as an encryption device, with a built-in backdoor, intended to be adopted by telecommunications companies for voice transmission. It was announced in 1993 and by 1996 was entirely defunct.
    Although that paragraph says "backdoor", it was a "front door" in the same sense the subject of this thread uses the term (govt can unlock it at will). It was disclosed up front that the Clipper encryption could be removed by the NSA (using key escrow, FWIW).

    Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.
     
  12. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #12
    Simple. you don't. That's why you don't give them that key.

    Two words. Truecrypt, and PGP (GnuPG). You could even do something like FileVault, and don't store the key with Apple.

    Either way, encrypt the drive, and then the files on the drive. when prompted for the passphrase, enter one, but split it into different parts, in which more than one person would have a part of that phrase. That way, no-one knows the entire passphrase to decrypt the drive containing the data to boot up, nor decrypt the data sitting on the drive.

    Then, with the 4th Amendment in hand, Johnny Cage uppercut the NSA like a Cleveland bus driver. Then while they are seeing stars, birds, and Snowden circling their heads, drape a Gadsden flag over them.

    This is the exact thing that not only Snowden, but Phil Zimmerman was worried about in the early to mid 1990s.

    BL.
     
  13. Praxis91 macrumors regular

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  14. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

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    #14
    That was discontinued last year.
     
  15. DonJudgeMe macrumors regular

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    #15
    So, instead of raping everyone of their constitutional rights... they want us to pull down our pants and consent to their desires whenever they want?

    Ummm, I'll pass.
     
  16. malman89 macrumors 68000

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    #16
    As far as I'm aware, Rand Paul is the only candidate who has even spoken about real reform for the NSA situation. Even if others have, he is definitely the only candidate who is serious enough to actually follow through with anything more than a mere symbolic gesture. However, one has to worry at what cost? There's going to be a lot of collateral damage to that bomb hitting other programs and services to cut.
     
  17. lostngone macrumors demi-god

    lostngone

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    #17
    Fair enough!

    How would the NSA/CIA/FBI feel about giving access to any and all its information to the People using the same technology?
     
  18. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #18
    Only for an independent security audit which has been completed for the windows version of the SW. It should be back next year.
     
  19. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #19
    Support being discontinued =/= software still being available for use.

    PGP had mainline support discontinued when PKWare and Symantec acquired it, but it was still available for use.

    But the concept still stands. encrypt the files, encrypt the disk, break up the keys, and store those in various locations, with some of those locations you don't even know.. The NSA would need all the pieces to get to your data, and even if compelled, you couldn't tell them everything they need.

    So you'd be protected, and there would be nothing the NSA could do. Call it the "enhanced Voldemort Horcrux approach".

    BL.
     
  20. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #20
    That's what I wanted. This would be an example of a nation willingly giving up its citizen's privacy for security. Why should'nt liberty be next on the chopping block in the name of Big Brother security? But we'll be safe and snug in our straight jackets with lofty personalities deciding on what we need.
     
  21. kilcher macrumors 65816

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    #21
    Meh, I'm far from being a conspiracy theorist but I just assume they're doing all of this already.
     
  22. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #22
    The repository is still there are recently passed a full audit. Also, several forks are under active development.

    http://istruecryptauditedyet.com/
     
  23. ActionableMango macrumors 604

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    #23
    That's really the reason? Because IIRC, I was looking to update my version and I went to the website. The website had just mysteriously closed down with no announcement or warning, and there was a message that recommended you not use it any more, but no reasons were given for anything. It all seems very suspicious to me.

    You don't need to stop development so that an independent security audit can approve a specific version of the code, but even if you did, say so. Don't mysteriously shut down with no warning or explanation.
     
  24. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #24
    There were LARGE questions about their SW it was all over my world then they shut down. After the shut down they said that they were going to have an independent security audit for all supported platforms. Sunday I heard the first news on LAS that it was done for Windows and things were mostly copacetic and that the found issues were going to be fixed then move on.
     
  25. HarryPot macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    Why are people so concerned about privacy against the government?

    I value my privacy regarding that fellow citizens don't get access to my private information.

    But I really couldn't care less if a government computer is reading my emails, texts, photos, etc. and scanning for national security threats.

    As long as you don't do anything against the law, you'll be safe.
     

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