Obama ducking "public financing" promises, McCain struggling

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Cleverboy, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #1
    Obama's Switcheroo
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120787159467506509.html?mod=googlenews_wsj
    Maybe he shouldn't give the "smart ass" answers, no matter how tired he is of the question. Doh. This is probably the biggest thorn in Obama's side. This wouldn't be an issue if McCain was raising money, but McCain's own statements about public financing have not endeared him to Republican donors.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=ax.vqApEj52k&refer=us
    ~ CB
     
  2. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    #2
    "muted criticism"? Oh no - this is something very real that McCain will be able to latch onto.
     
  3. Cleverboy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #3
    Yup. Given the way its playing out, this will be a McCain drum. Clinton may also beat this drum if she knows what's good for her. It's a big fat target of inconsistency on Obama's part. He'll pull a "I'll address this when/if I'm the nominee, as such talk presupposes I will be." comment, which might be fair to say, but will it play well?

    Generally, talk of this nature... like "who will your vice president be?" are fairly characterized as "ONLY after I'm the nominee" questions the candidates tend to downplay. McCain is the presumptive nominee, so these questions are VERY MUCH fair game for him. But, they certainly have weight given Obama's fund raising success.

    ~ CB
     
  4. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

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    #4
    First, both sides have said "I'll do it if they do it." If neither does it is either bound by that pledge?

    Second, and this will prove once and for all that I am a complete and utter moron the article says:

    and

    If he's only on the verge of shattering the record set by our current president, how does eschewing public funds limit his fund raising. He'd still be able to raise at least as much as Bush did in 2004, right? If he's the first since 1976 to go private, then Bush must have used public funds too.

    I always thought that public funds were turned down by both Bush and Kerry in 2004, although Kerry had made a pledge that he'd do it if Bush did. Of course my memory isn't always the best, and it's not like campaign finance law makes much sense to begin with.


    Edit:
    Google is my friend, Google is my friend...

    link

    Both turned down public financing for the primaries freeing them from the $45 million limit, although both took federal funds for the general election. Why wouldn't Obama take these funds then? Bush raised $360 million and took the funds, what massive restriction would this put on his campaign?
     
  5. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #5
    Not so much. McCain has his own problems with the public financing issue as well, so he is open to charges of hypocrisy if you attacks Obama for doing essentially the same thing he himself did.

    It's the same reason McCain can't get much traction out of the Wright issue. He's got his own pastor problems.
     
  6. stevento macrumors 6502

    stevento

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    #6
    john mccain said that he knew obama didn't believe it so it wasn't an issue.
     
  7. Cleverboy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #7
    McCain to Obama: keep your word on public funds
    http://www.reuters.com/article/politicsNews/idUSN1142582820080411
    I think this is the telltale and most salient point:
    I suppose Obama has a little wiggle room for now.

    ~ CB
     
  8. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #8
    Wasn't Obama's pledge that he would accept public financing in the general election predicated upon his opponent doing the same? If so, then until McCain announces that he will accept public financing, Obama's pledge is non-operative.

    In any case, it was a stupid thing to say, and hopefully he has now realized the error of voluntarily putting down the proverbial gun and taking up the knife if you're in a knife fight.
     
  9. Cleverboy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #9
    Hindsight 20/20, I'm sure Obama didn't realize he'd be a fund-raising demi-god. His original promises, as I read it, wasn't even that he WOULD... but that he'd pursue it with his eventual opponent if he were the nominee. My workmate said the same thing though, about it being insanity, considering. I still think a politician's words need to mean something... I think he's got a clear obligation on the table, or risk looking more than disingenuous, however rational it might be.

    ~ CB
     
  10. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #10
    That's what I thought too:

    http://elections.foxnews.com/2008/02/25/democrats-to-seek-fec-investigation-of-mccain-financing/

    But that hasn't stopped him before, and he is actually pursuing it. Despite not following it himself, and Obama not being the candidate yet. If McCain actually abides by it, Obama might have to too, even if he could outraise him, and it looks like he very well could. This really isn't that big of a deal, but I am once again disappointed in the MSM for covering the story without mentioning the other side's issues on the subject, like the one above that is still never mentioned.

    Could be worse, they could still be talking about Obama's bowling, or the comment he made about poorer people being taking advantage of by the GOP that was completely that got misconstrued that was poorly worded, but McCain actually said the same thing too. Hm, get a lot of that. Obama had his preachers talked about, McCain's weren't. Obama might have to follow rules he said he would if McCain would, but McCain isn't and no one mentions that part. McCain says something about what happens when the poor get frustrated, and it's not mentioned, even when Obama says something similar, even though he's criticized for it, and can come back right away to give a good speech about it turning it into a positive. Talking to us like adults, which gets him criticized for being an elitists. All while McCain's many gaffs about the war and the economy are ignored. Seeing a pattern here. Stoopid liberal media.
     

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