Obama signed WEATHER SPACE PROGRAM....hmm


thermodynamic

Suspended
May 3, 2009
1,336
1,175
USA
Having just done a few quick searches on increased solar flare activity, it's safe to say that it is time to take the tinfoil hat, wrap it around a bacon sandwich, and put it in the fridge.

If nothing else, that logo reminds me, my next laptop will be Alienware brand...
 

pat500000

Suspended
Original poster
Jun 3, 2015
8,515
7,386
Having just done a few quick searches on increased solar flare activity, it's safe to say that it is time to take the tinfoil hat, wrap it around a bacon sandwich, and put it in the fridge.

If nothing else, that logo reminds me, my next laptop will be Alienware brand...
What do you mean?
 

jkcerda

macrumors 6502a
Jun 10, 2013
682
39,059
Criminal Mexi Midget
,,,,,,blah blah
__________

Space weather, as in solar flares and whatnot, can effect a bunch of stuff here on Earth. It can screw with our communications networks, mess up GPS systems, and raise all kinds of havoc with our electronics. Particularly bad solar storms can blow power grids if we aren't prepared for them.

________________
 

APlotdevice

macrumors 68040
Sep 3, 2011
3,109
3,749
,,,,,,blah blah
__________

Space weather, as in solar flares and whatnot, can effect a bunch of stuff here on Earth. It can screw with our communications networks, mess up GPS systems, and raise all kinds of havoc with our electronics. Particularly bad solar storms can blow power grids if we aren't prepared for them.

________________
Aye, in short it is a major hazard for our modern civilization.
 
  • Like
Reactions: VulchR

pat500000

Suspended
Original poster
Jun 3, 2015
8,515
7,386
,,,,,,blah blah
__________

Space weather, as in solar flares and whatnot, can effect a bunch of stuff here on Earth. It can screw with our communications networks, mess up GPS systems, and raise all kinds of havoc with our electronics. Particularly bad solar storms can blow power grids if we aren't prepared for them.

________________
But it's not something a man can control, can it?
 

jkcerda

macrumors 6502a
Jun 10, 2013
682
39,059
Criminal Mexi Midget
sigh renz

__________________________

Not so much a direct hazard as a massive occasional pain in the ass. We've done quite a bit to shield ourselves from the worst effects of your average, run of the mill solar storms. Large ones can still present problems, though, yes, even they can be mitigated against.

If we were to ever be hit by one of unprecedented size and strength, you could probably expect a week or two of rolling brownouts and spotty cell service, with a few extended blackouts here and there for less prepared grids. GPS would be screwy as hell, too. It'd be hugely inconvenient, but it wouldn't end civilization as we know it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pat500000

APlotdevice

macrumors 68040
Sep 3, 2011
3,109
3,749
sigh renz

__________________________

Not so much a direct hazard as a massive occasional pain in the ass. We've done quite a bit to shield ourselves from the worst effects of your average, run of the mill solar storms. Large ones can still present problems, though, yes, even they can be mitigated against.

If we were to ever be hit by one of unprecedented size and strength, you could probably expect a week or two of rolling brownouts and spotty cell service, with a few extended blackouts here and there for less prepared grids. GPS would be screwy as hell, too. It'd be hugely inconvenient, but it wouldn't end civilization as we know it.
Certainly not the end, no, but given the money that is going to be lost during those times, it's a bit more than inconvenient.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pat500000

Snoopy4

macrumors 6502a
Dec 29, 2014
661
2,921
Having just done a few quick searches on increased solar flare activity, it's safe to say that it is time to take the tinfoil hat, wrap it around a bacon sandwich, and put it in the fridge.

If nothing else, that logo reminds me, my next laptop will be Alienware brand...
Indeed. I'm more concerned about an inevitable pole flip. That'll be a damn mess.
[doublepost=1476655123][/doublepost]
Until we transition to windmills and solar cells, space weather will continue to get worse.
Space warming? :)
 

s2mikey

macrumors 68020
Sep 23, 2013
2,462
2,521
Upstate, NY
Wow - another chance to piss way taxpayer dollars on superflous crap. Whats next? Galaxy-warming/Universe control?

Ridiculous.
 

DrewDaHilp1

macrumors 6502a
Mar 29, 2009
578
11,573
All Your Memes Are Belong to US
sigh renz

__________________________

Not so much a direct hazard as a massive occasional pain in the ass. We've done quite a bit to shield ourselves from the worst effects of your average, run of the mill solar storms. Large ones can still present problems, though, yes, even they can be mitigated against.

If we were to ever be hit by one of unprecedented size and strength, you could probably expect a week or two of rolling brownouts and spotty cell service, with a few extended blackouts here and there for less prepared grids. GPS would be screwy as hell, too. It'd be hugely inconvenient, but it wouldn't end civilization as we know it.
It would certainly be longer than a week or two. Recent shooting attacks on grids have cost millions of dollars in repairs alone and only mitigated by portable back ups. Link. Link Granted these are physical attacks not solar storm type events but if a repair to one will take months imagine if they all or a significant portion of substations go down. You're talking billions in damage to the electrical grid alone. Not to mention the lives lost and economical impact.
 
  • Like
Reactions: yaxomoxay

vrDrew

macrumors 65816
Jan 31, 2010
1,317
11,839
Midlife, Midwest
Space weather, as in solar flares and whatnot, can effect a bunch of stuff here on Earth. It can screw with our communications networks, mess up GPS systems, and raise all kinds of havoc with our electronics. Particularly bad solar storms can blow power grids if we aren't prepared for them.
So I take it you agree with Obama signing this particular Executive Order?

It's stuff like this that reminds me how totally delusional all the anti-Government nutters in this country have become. Because I think a lot of those people have literally no idea how important it is that we have a Federal Government with the resources and authority to coordinate things like this.

Today we take things like the power grid and GPS for granted. But without the Federal Government, they simply would not exist. Private businesses, contractors, etc. may very well play their part, but it's up to the Feds to make sure they all use the same systems, so we don't duplicate efforts, and that all the systems can talk to each other. So we have regulations; we have scientists and engineers, and we have agencies planning for disasters, and making contingency plans.

You can't realistically make a commercial business out of solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Those events don't happen very often, and the potential costs are all but unknowable. The only way to make sure we are left, lost and in the dark, is by corrdinating our preparations via the US Federal Government.
 

VulchR

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2009
2,329
10,255
Scotland
But it's not something a man can control, can it?
Wow - another chance to piss way taxpayer dollars on superflous crap. Whats next? Galaxy-warming/Universe control? Ridiculous.
My sarcasm detector is faulty as best, so apologies if comments appearing here like these are jests. I believe if you asked any scientist or engineer involved in looking at how the solar wind can impact technology on Earth they'd tell you that the energy involved is massive; it could take down entire satellite systems, power grids, and, yes, even military communications; and that damage can be prevented in power grids and satellites provided there is advanced warning. This requires a satellite positioned between the earth and the sun communicating at the speed of light using radio when a solar flare is detected. The flares travel at less than the speed of light, so this can give power network managers and satellite operators precious minutes to get their equipment in safe mode.

If you have any doubt about the disruption flares can cause then look at http://www.space.com/12584-worst-solar-storms-sun-flares-history.html.

In any case, hopefully this will mean better aurora predictions for those of us living North (or South) enough to see them. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: pat500000

pat500000

Suspended
Original poster
Jun 3, 2015
8,515
7,386
My sarcasm detector is faulty as best, so apologies if comments appearing here like these are jests. I believe if you asked any scientist or engineer involved in looking at how the solar wind can impact technology on Earth they'd tell you that the energy involved is massive; it could take down entire satellite systems, power grids, and, yes, even military communications; and that damage can be prevented in power grids and satellites provided there is advanced warning. This requires a satellite positioned between the earth and the sun communicating at the speed of light using radio when a solar flare is detected. The flares travel at less than the speed of light, so this can give power network managers and satellite operators precious minutes to get their equipment in safe mode.

If you have any doubt about the disruption flares can cause then look at http://www.space.com/12584-worst-solar-storms-sun-flares-history.html.

In any case, hopefully this will mean better aurora predictions for those of us living North (or South) enough to see them. :)
It's interesting. No more iphones.
 
  • Like
Reactions: VulchR