Obesity High in Toddlers?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by stevento, Apr 7, 2009.

  1. stevento macrumors 6502

    stevento

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    #1
    I read this story and I thought, this cannot be true. But apparently among American 4 year olds, 1 in 5 is obese. No, that's not me being sensational, that's exactly what the story says. It's clear how we let America become the fattest nation on earth, but the fact that we are letting this happen to our children is just plain wrong.
     
  2. themoonisdown09 macrumors 601

    themoonisdown09

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    #2
    I agree that there are way more obese kids now than there was 20 years ago.

    When I was in preschool, there was maybe 1 fat kid in class. Same goes for elementary, there was maybe two kids that were fat among 50 or so students. This is not the case now.

    It's really sad and I would hold the parents accountable for it.
     
  3. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #3
    It's actually the government that should be held accountable for it. The food pyramid is a shambles, the information it provides is not only massively incorrect, but extremely confusing. The government subsidizes farmers in a completely uneven manner that promotes the sale of processed foods and keep the price of meat and dairy artificially low. The school system lacks even a rudimentary nutrition and exercise component. Packaging regulations are such that artificial food products slathered in salt and pumped full of preservatives make outlandish health claims about the contents. Supplements and herbal remedies litter the airways with claims about nutrition, metabolism and genetics that are flat out lies.

    Where are the parents supposed to learn proper nutrition and exercise habits to pass down to their children?
     
  4. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #4
    The library?
     
  5. Bobdude161 macrumors 65816

    Bobdude161

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    #5
    Schools only serve one meal (lunch) to kids a day. Parents feed their kids a meal twice a day (breakfast and dinner), not counting snacks. How can most of children's obesity be blamed on schools when they only feed our kids a quarter of their food a day? And less than that in a week considering the 5 day school week?

    Parents just need to kick their kids off the boob tubes and just throw them outside. Parental discipline is a much larger factor in obesity than school nutrition, my friends.
     
  6. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #6
    Which of the roughly 50 000+ diet books should they read?
    The problem isn't the food the schools serve (especially as many schools don't provide even one meal), but the lack of education on the subject of nutrition. The parents can't teach their children what they themselves never learned in schools or from their parents.
     
  7. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #7
    My personal favorite is "The Cave Man's Guide to Surviving Winter".

    Seriously, if someone cannot become informed about raising children, then they shouldn't have children. (I know, that's a lost cause.)
     
  8. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #8
    That's certainly a part of the problem. But it is a lost cause, and what we're seeing is unintended consequences of a lot of different factors in society that we haven't adapted to. The societal pressure to have a family is enormous. Early subsidization of meat and dairy farmers has lead to an immensely strong set of lobbyists that has ended senatorial careers and kept the food pyramid cryptic and industry-serving. Subsidies of the aforementioned as well as corn has led to $.99 fast food burgers that are much more in the price range of a lower-class family than a home-cooked meal. Thanks to industrialization supermarkets now contain more food products than food. The rising cost of living has helped ensure families rarely have time to observe proper diet and exercise.
     
  9. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #9
    I have to disagree with part of this. How much does a family of 4 spend on a meal at (insert burger joint or similar restaurant of choice here)? I'm guessing once you factor in fries and drinks, it's in the neighborhood of $15-20. If you can't put a decent meal together at home for significantly less than that, there's something wrong. It might be more time-consuming and will lack the appeal of a prize in the box, but it can be done.

    I think the real problem lies in the fact that it's just easier to go through the drive-thru or pop open a can/box of something preprocessed than it is to really cook. Cooking from scratch and learning to read labels lets you control the ingredients, and you can get rid of a lot of the crap they put into food these days if you just pay attention. But of course, it's easier not to.
     
  10. yojitani macrumors 68000

    yojitani

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    #10
    I'd say there are a combination of problems contributing to this and education is one of them. My wife and I were shocked to learn that in our school district, tomato ketchup counts as a vegetable on the lunch plate. School lunches tend to consist of greasy food: pizza, hamburgers, tacos, etc. Then there is the stuff that my son has come back with about nutrition, most memorably that he should eat mac and cheese for calcium.

    It's an effort but at home we only eat organic produce, milk etc. 3 meals a day for under $300 per month (usually closer to the 250 mark). We eat well, but watch sales closely :)
     
  11. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #11
    According to the Mayo Clinic, the cost per serving for a homemade hamburger is equal if not higher than fast food when you include the higher cost of healthier food (IE whole wheat bun vs. white), and before condiments are added (so if you matched pickle for pickle, McDonalds has quite a leg up).
     
  12. yojitani macrumors 68000

    yojitani

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    #12
    Are they making the comparison using real meat against real meat or McDonalds meat against real meat?
     
  13. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #13
    Hardly a fair comparison. The (insert burger joint or similar restaurant of choice here) includes labor and overhead (not to mention profit) into the cost of their product.

    How much is your time worth? How much time do you spend preparing a home-cooked meal (let alone cleaning up afterwards)? Multiply the two numbers together, and add it to your estimate of the cost of a burger. Is it still cheaper to eat healthy at home?
     
  14. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #14
    Lean ground beef vs. whatever meat a fast food restaurant uses.
    Aye, there's the rub. Fast food being cheap would hardly be a problem if its nutritional value were reasonable.
     
  15. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #15
    I'm sure you know this, but it's pretty well documented that eating healthy costs more than eating crappy. Against all logic, the population actually gets fatter as they get poorer because of this.
     
  16. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #16
    If you really want to lose weight using those books, it would be better to baste them liberally and serve them for dinner.
     
  17. yojitani macrumors 68000

    yojitani

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    #17
    I would imagine there is a large gap between the quality of meat you get at a store and the stuff that McDs uses.. could be wrong. It certainly doesn't TASTE good, IMO.
     
  18. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #18
    They also get to buy in bulk and probably get better rates than what you or I would pay in the supermarket. I don't buy ground beef in lots of more than a pound or two at a go, how about you?

    This is rather a nonsensical point. If you're not at work, your time isn't worth anything, unless you pay yourself for doing whatever you do when you're not at work.

    Remember Morgan Spurlock, who ate at McDs for every meal for a month? Put on some 20+ pounds and his cholesterol level went up by what, 70 points? If you really want to factor everything in, why not add in the cost of the doctor visits and statin pills you'll eventually need?
     
  19. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    #19
    According to a recent NEJM-published study, just about any of them. For most people's weight loss purposes, as long as your nutritional needs are being met and you're eating less food, the specific balances of this versus that are pretty irrelevant.
     
  20. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #20
    Exactly.
    If McDonalds offered healthy alternatives at a lower cost, there wouldn't be a problem.
    Now if we could just get that study stapled to the inside of each of those books, we'd be getting somewhere. I'm not suggesting that 50 000 books exist because the subject is complicated, but rather that the existence of 50 000 books has overcomplicated the subject to the extent that it's become an almost impenetrable fog that presents itself as overwhelming.

    (I do remember reading that study rather excitedly, btw)
     
  21. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    #21
    Oh, in my opinion it's worse than overwhelming. It's insidious. The impenetrable fog convinces people that there is a magic secret that will trick their bodies into burning fat. The existence of fifty thousand books means that there are effectively infinite things to try, and every time one fails, all you learn is that that particular author has not found the Philosopher's Stone. It maintains a lucrative market where Gelfin's Miracle "Eat Less Food" Diet (logline: "It's the Calories, stupid.") wouldn't justify more than a leaflet given away for free at the checkstand.
     
  22. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    #22
    I can only speak for my local area but in recent years the nearby schools are seeing more cars parked outside. When I was at these schools (junior and primary, and I'm only 23 now) the roads were almost empty at school leaving time. Everyone walked. Now the roads are clogged at 3pm and these little walking puddings are getting bigger.
    Doesn't help that the council went and gated a few fields that were next to these schools.

    No bloody exercise.
     
  23. No1451 macrumors 6502

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    #23
    I'm not sure how anyone can blame the schools. Parents who are not prepared or who don't know how to raise a healthy child should not become parents.

    Encourage good behaviour at home rather than plopping the kid in front of the tv or computer. And none of this "eating health is expensive" crap. When you buy groceries wait for a sale then stock up your freezer/pantry with a lot of meat/breads/pasta/rice/whatever.
     
  24. imac/cheese macrumors 6502a

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    #24
    McDonalds does offer healthy alternatives at lower costs. Instead of Big Mac, Fires, and a Coke, you could just get the Big Mac and a Coke. You just saved a lot of calories and a little bit of money.

    In my opinion, it is not the unhealthy nature of the food we eat that makes people fat, it is the quantity. It is never more expensive to eat less food.
     
  25. themoonisdown09 macrumors 601

    themoonisdown09

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    #25
    I really don't know how people get obese. I mean, all the people are know that are really overweight eat out almost every day for lunch at fast food restaurants. They have pizza once a week. They also drink a soft drink every day. They also don't exercise.

    I'm not bragging, but I've never been overweight. I could be overweight (or obese) very easily, but I chose not too. I rarely have a soft drink (I do drink beer a couple times a month). I don't eat out every night (maybe once every week or two). I run at least twice a week. When I buy beef, it's the leanest beef available. I don't eat candy or sugar often. (I'll stop there as to not bore you)

    My point is that it's not that hard to know how to stay fit and healthy. Most of it is common sense, and what's not can be learned about in books.

    I can't remember where I read it, but someone said that staying healthy and fit is 80% diet (food intake), 10% exercise, 10% genetics.

    There's no excuse for someone saying that their metabolism is too slow or that they are fat because their parents were. They just don't want to take responsibility for their own actions.

    Sorry for the rant.

    No. If people didn't eat at McDonalds, there wouldn't be a problem.

    I completely agree. When I was a kid, I was outside all the time. I would get home from school, play outside, come in for dinner, then go back outside until it got dark. I didn't sit in front of the TV all day or play video games.
     

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