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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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OS X Yosemite has brought some major changes to Apple's Mail app, and those changes aren't limited to a simple visual overhaul. Mail may have a new look, but it also has several new features like Mail Drop and Markup.

With Markup, you can annotate images and PDFs from directly within the Mail app. For example, when composing an email message and attaching a PDF, it's possible to use various tools to add signatures, emphasis, and more. The same is possible with an image -- simply attach a file in a message that's being composed and right click on it, selecting Markup.

Markup has a set of tools at the top that allow users to create shapes, write text words, and insert signatures. There are different brushes that can be used, along with a color palette and various font options.

markuptools.jpg
Users can enter various shapes, such as stars, circles, squares, speech bubbles and more, and there's a magnifying glass that will magnify sections of text or photos. A crop tool also allows for simple image edits, and there's a pen tool for free-handed writing or drawing.

Markup's neatest feature is a signature tool that lets users insert a signature using the trackpad of a MacBook or a camera. With the trackpad, clicking begin and then signing a name with a finger on the trackpad will create a signature that's automatically entered into a document.

trackpad.jpg
There's also an option that allows users to write a signature on a white piece of paper and use a Mac's FaceTime camera to import it into the document. It's a little bit finicky getting the camera to recognize the signature, but once it's lined up properly, the feature works well.

markupsignature.jpg
Along with Markup, Mail has a new feature called Mail Drop that lets users send large file attachments of up to 5GB using iCloud. Composing an email message and attaching a file that would normally be too large to send will prompt Mail to ask a user if they would like to use Mail Drop to deliver the message.

sendmaildrop.jpg
When the Mail Drop option is selected, the person receiving the email will receive the file attachment as normal if they're using Mail, while non-Mail users will receive a message with a download link that allows them to download the file directly from iCloud. Files are stored in iCloud for several days before being deleted.

maildropicloud.jpg
MacRumors did not experience any issues getting Mail Drop to function with files ranging in size from 10MB to over 1GB, but some users on the Apple Support forums have been having trouble with the feature. Because Mail Drop works based on a sender's file size limits rather than a receiver's, users have run into an issue where they can send a file that is below their own maximum file size threshold, but above a receiver's file size limits.

For example, sending a 10MB message from an email account that has a 30MB file size limit to an email account that has a 6MB file size limit will not activate Mail Drop and turn the file into a clickable link that can be downloaded from iCloud. Therefore, the person sending the message will get a bounce back reply that the user can't accept a message of that size, even if the receiver also has Mail Drop.

According to Apple, Mail Drop can only be used to send files that "exceed the maximum size allowed by the provider of your email account," which means there is no way for a user to select a custom file size threshold to activate Mail Drop to avoid the above situation. It is not clear if Apple has plans to implement manual size controls for Mail Drop, but for the time being, it appears that Mail Drop may not be useful for all users in certain situations.

Released to the public yesterday, OS X Yosemite can be downloaded from the Mac App Store at no cost. It runs on all machines that were capable of running OS X Mountain Lion and OS X Mavericks, and it requires 8GB of storage space and 2GB of RAM. [Direct Link]

Article Link: OS X Yosemite: An In-Depth Look at Markup and Mail Drop in the Mail App
 

gugy

macrumors 68040
Jan 31, 2005
3,566
4,638
La Jolla, CA
I hope mail drop works very well.
That will be a great thing for my work that entails sending large files by email all the time.
 

bpeeps

macrumors 68040
May 6, 2011
3,476
3,875
There's also an option that allows users to write a signature on a white piece of paper and use a Mac's FaceTime camera to import it into the document. It's a little bit finicky getting the camera to recognize the signature, but once it's lined up properly, the feature works well.

The best part is it saves the signature once you've done it and you get a drop down menu in Preview to attach it wherever you want. Pretty neat feature.
 

Daku93

macrumors regular
Oct 29, 2010
235
253
Macrumors said:
For example, sending a 10MB message from an email account that has a 30MB file size limit to an email account that has a 6GB file size limit will not activate Mail Drop and turn the file into a clickable link that can be downloaded from iCloud. Therefore, the person sending the message will get a bounce back reply that the user can't accept a message of that size, even if the receiver also has Mail Drop.

You mean 6MB, right? Because with 6GB that whole paragraph would make no sense...
 

3282868

macrumors 603
Jan 8, 2009
5,281
0
According to Apple, Mail Drop can only be used to send files that "exceed the maximum size allowed by the provider of your email account," which means there is no way for a user to select a custom file size threshold to activate Mail Drop to avoid the above situation. It is not clear if Apple has plans to implement manual size controls for Mail Drop, but for the time being, it appears that Mail Drop may not be useful for all users in certain situations.

Seems OS X 10.10 could benefit from more work before rushing it out every year since 10.7. Delta updates during beta testing over a few months for developers compared to 1-2 years prior with clean installs each beta does not a solid OS make. Quite a few open bugs that are serious enough have yet to be resolved. I'd wait for 10.10.1 before diving in.
 
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KALLT

macrumors 603
Sep 23, 2008
5,229
3,285
Didn’t Federighi say that they would focus on ‘the basics’ of Mail in Yosemite? So far the only changes I can see are the features he demonstrated during the keynote. Mail Drop and Markup are nice additions, but not ones I would use very often, if at all. I still miss features like the swipe gestures, tagging, better folder management, new e-mail rules, better spam filtering, native PGP support and so on.
 

darkslide29

macrumors 68000
Oct 5, 2011
1,820
803
San Francisco, California
Seem OS X 10.10 could benefit from more work before rushing it out every year since 10.7. Delta updates during beta testing over a few months for developers compared to 1-2 years prior with clean installs each beta does not a solid OS make. Quite a few open bugs that are serious enough have yet to be resolved. I'd wait for 10.10.1 before diving in.

One does not simply visit MacRumors every day and anticipate releases, only to be patient and wait for 10.10.1! :D
 

aaronvan

Suspended
Dec 21, 2011
1,350
9,352
República Cascadia
Trying Mail Drop right now. 126MB email. Mail didn't ask if I wanted to use Mail Drop and the sent mail doesn't indicate that the addressee is getting a link; it just looks like the email was sent with the attachments. However, I didn't get a bounce back that the files are too large.
 

X-X

macrumors 6502
Aug 22, 2014
401
9
I thought this feature would be unreliable and only usable with an iCloud mail address.

I expected NOTHING.

Wow, I was wrong... it works great, fast and with every mail account.

Mail Drop is AWESOME.


Maybe they integrate a button for it in future OS X releases so you can also send attachments that don't exceed your mail account limit with it. That's the only thing missing.
 

sklettke

macrumors newbie
Sep 20, 2005
16
2
Illinois
Maybe someone here can answer this: If I am sending a file via Mail Drop that is already on my iCloud Drive, do I have to wait until a new one gets uploaded? Shouldn't it just link to the file that's already on there?

Unfortunately, I think I know the answer: I sent my brother (to his gmail address) a 190MB PDF. It was sent via Mail Drop, but I had to wait the entire time when it was uploading even though the file was already in my iCloud Drive. Did I send it wrong? This seems like a waste of time and bandwidth.

Also, having Mail Drop be available via the web interface would be great as well. You should be able to just pick a file to send that it already on your iCloud Drive.
 

X-X

macrumors 6502
Aug 22, 2014
401
9
Maybe someone here can answer this: If I am sending a file via Mail Drop that is already on my iCloud Drive, do I have to wait until a new one gets uploaded?

Mail Drop is completely independent from your iCloud Drive and that is great, because it doesn't count against your limit.

In other words it's free unlimited storage for attachments (for 30 days).
 

X-X

macrumors 6502
Aug 22, 2014
401
9
So is this update going pretty well for everyone? Thinking I might do it tonight.

I'm very cautious with things like that, but in this case it's worth it.

There're no real major bugs only some minor ones and some UI glitches here and there, nothing to worry about.


p.s. I did a clean install and manual migrate of my data to get a fresh start.
 

sklettke

macrumors newbie
Sep 20, 2005
16
2
Illinois
Mail Drop is completely independent from your iCloud Drive and that is great, because it doesn't count against your limit.

In other words it's free unlimited storage for attachments (for 30 days).

That's good to know. But, if we specifically choose a file from the iCloud Drive folder why can't it be smart and send the email immediately (since the file is already on its servers). If I drag in a file from outside my iCloud Drive folder, then sure, upload away and don't count against my storage.
 

X-X

macrumors 6502
Aug 22, 2014
401
9
That's good to know. But, if we specifically choose a file from the iCloud Drive folder why can't it be smart and send the email immediately (since the file is already on its servers). If I drag in a file from outside my iCloud Drive folder, then sure, upload away and don't count against my storage.

Then they would have to keep that link up for an unlimited amount of time, or give you extensive sharing options for iCloud Drive. I guess they don't want to turn iCloud into a file sharing service.
 

nt5672

macrumors 68020
Jun 30, 2007
2,409
5,149
I wonder what the security of mail drop is? I'm guessing that since it is easy to use, it must not have any security as that would make it complicated.
 
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