Photoshopping bodies out of clothes (for catalogs)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Shacklebolt, Oct 25, 2011.

  1. Shacklebolt macrumors 6502a

    Shacklebolt

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    #1
    .... and a different question. Just to preface, I've definitely checked around the internet for answers to this one and haven't found anything super-satisfactory, and I'm not asking for a detailed description of how to do it anyway. Basically, just a how-long-would-it-take-per-thing-and-how-difficult-is-it question:

    Some clients are asking (for a future gig) of shots of clothes with models in them, and then shots of just the garments with the models photoshopped out. I know that it's obviously possible to photoshop out a body and leave the clothes behind, but how involved of a process is it? The background will be heavy white paper, so is it probably just cloning? If so, in that case, would I have to carve around the garment lines by hand, or is there a "lasso"-type function that will do it if there's a clear line between the model's skin and the garment?

    Thanks in advance for reading these ridiculous questions. Easy to be unafraid of displaying blatant n00bism when everyone in this forum is just so damn nice.
     
  2. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

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    #2
    I have the opposite problem... :p
     
  3. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

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    #3
    How many ways can you skin a cat? Masking is an art in itself, and the amount of time it takes to do it well and which method is best depends entirely upon the photos. I would reckon that a dab hand could bang out a good, hi-res masking job like this in about 20 minutes. It could be even less time if the client needs only low-res web files. That's assuming the photos were taken with such a process in mind, ensuring that everything is done right to minimize problems in performing the extractions. I usually budget an hour per extraction for hi-res files, but that's because the photos I work on tend to be more difficult (not shot on white, for example).

    As for methods: I find that the Quick Selection Tool in Photoshop is quite useful, but I also use "found masks" whenever possible (using copies of individual color channels, for example).
     
  4. Shacklebolt thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Shacklebolt

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    #4
    Hehe, yeah, I had to make sure I got the order right in the thread title. ;-)
     
  5. Shacklebolt thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Shacklebolt

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    #5
    Just to clarify, you mean 20 minutes per photo, correct?
     
  6. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #6
    You'd probably get better arrangements using a mannequin and separate shoot. Besides, booking two shoots is better business ;)

    Paul
     
  7. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

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    #7
    Yes, for a hi-res masking job of a full figure, that would be the best-case scenario. As I said, I budget a full hour per photo. A really difficult job can take several hours (per photo).
     
  8. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    Aug 5, 2010
    #8
    It's not "that" difficult. You do however need to shoot interior portions of clothing that would be hidden by the models when worn. For maximum realism you want the perspective as close as possible. Beyond that it's a certain amount of masking then cleaning up the lighting on the final composite. This really isn't terribly complex work. Are you reasonably good with the pen tool?
     
  9. TheDrift- macrumors 6502a

    TheDrift-

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    Mar 8, 2010
    #9
    My answer would be..... it depends:

    Something like an opaque jumper or a pair of jeans say.. 1 or 2 mins maybe, for more intricate clothes it might take more time.

    Things that would make it more difficult are say white clothes that pick up a slight tinge from skin or another article of clothing....or where skin is visible under clothes e.g. a semi transparent top..

    Long hair etc falling over the clothes, or body parts in front of the clothes again will be a nightmare.

    Anything fury or with a lot of folds or creases to cut around again will take longer.

    as others have said channel masks or quick selection (might be a bit rough) could work but I like the pen tool and refining your selection (subtract should work well).

    I used the pen tool on this its a pretty awkward shape (and it was not shot to be extracted as you can tell) took 3/4 mins

    [​IMG]

    The top left doesn't look quite right as there was a blouse collar extending over the jumper and the sleeve on the left doesn't look right as the hand was raised, to fix it you would probably need to copy the other sleeve. (please bear in mind that this was the first portrait i came across, and it really wasn't that suitable to extract...it was just to give you an idea!)

    Basically I would practice a few extractions and see what makes it difficult. Some stuff shot right can be extracted very easily other stuff like that mentioned above could take hours to get right...so i guess it depends!
     
  10. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

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    #10
    Yeah, something like TheDrift- posted is a quick-and-dirty result (which he intended, I'm not criticizing it) that will work for web use at a small size. But even here, you can see the choppiness of the pen tool selection (angles where there should be subtle curves, etc.). If you need hi-res for catalog printing, you'll have to be much more accurate, and you won't get away with spending only a few minutes per photo on the masking.

    At any rate, TheDrift's suggestion to do some practice extractions is a good one. Try it first at full resolution and view the results at 1:1 pixels (100%) to see how accurate you can get. Then try it with a low-res file to see how much easier that is. You may find that for low-res, it's easiest to work on the full-res file, but quickly and loosely; then when you reduce it, any minor problems will not be noticeable.
     
  11. Designer Dale macrumors 68040

    Designer Dale

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    #11
    This is a good example of the issues you run into with this type of effect. Removing the body from the photo is not that big a deal, but then you have to rebuild parts of the cloth to get the "Invisible Man" look that the OP wants.

    Here's a youtube video of rebuilding the inside of a hoodie. Epic challenge.

    Invisible Man Pt 1

    Paul has the right idea. Shoot with mannequins. This would minimize some of the rebuilding.

    Dale
     
  12. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #12
    This is actually a pretty good example. I realize the photo may not have been entirely appropriate for extraction but it's actually a pretty realistic starting point on extraction. You'd need the missing portions. If it ends up looking too cut out, you can adjust the shading or the hardness of the outline (it makes no sense for the outline to be sharper than the detail of the photo itself). Then there's a lot of minor lighting adjustment to make the whole thing work just right and properly emphasize the shape of the garment without it being occupied. I'm speaking from experience here. Also that blue wouldn't print well :p. If you're skilled with photoshop it shouldn't take hours. It might take an hour start to finish. It all depends.
     

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