Please Critique My First Wild Life Photography (Canon EF- 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6) IS USM

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dextor143, Jan 17, 2010.

  1. Dextor143 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    #1
    Hi,
    After reading bunch of forums and reviews I decided to give a try to Canon EF-70-300 f/4.5-5.6 IS USM. A lot of people were saying to get the "L" series that is 70-200 f/2.8 IS USM L for better colors and sharpness.

    Anyways, I would really appreciate if you can tell me how I did? and what do I need to do to improve. "I am a Newbiee"

    I have over 1000 pics that I took today from Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago. I am posting some and will post some later.

    One thing that I had a lot of problem was with Shutter Priority, I Know it takes experience and trial and error to get the right pic, but I was getting them too dark and had a lot of problems. It was sunny and little cloudy so I tried everything. I even set my ISO to max but still. Most of these pics are with ISO at 800.

    The Gear I have is Canon 450D (XSI) and Lens was 70-300f/4.5-5.6 IS USM..." Let me know if I should keep this or try others"
    Thanks plz comment.


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Dextor143 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Location:
    USA
  3. Dextor143 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Location:
    USA
  4. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #4
    Hey, nice stuff! I'm not one to critique photos, but I've been agonizing over a telephoto lens lately myself (you have have seen this thread) and I'm liking the results you are getting with your initial shots. Many of the shots are outstanding IMHO. It's reassurance that this lens can perform nicely, albeit much closer to your subjects than you might (want) in the wild (especially the lion!). :p

    Can you comment more on the lens... eg. how many keepers you are getting in terms of sharp focus? Anything else you've noticed?
     
  5. Dextor143 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    #5
    Focus was pretty good. I had great range with this lens. I just had a trouble with shutter priority but thats my own fault as I really don't know much about it and I am still learning it.
     
  6. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    ~119W 34N
    #6
    I wanted to throw my two cents worth in on the lens: I have the same lens, as an upgrade to my older 75-300 IS, and I've been very impressed with the quality both in sharpness and contrast. Focus speed has been markedly improved over the previous system. The IS is also much improved and having the multiple modes is a plus, for some situations.

    Focus accuracy has been right-on for me, but I think that's more a function of the body (though the focus mechanism is a factor). I have a 10D, and I know there have been some changes since that model came out. In any event, I'm sure you'll continue to have great results with that lens.
     
  7. Dextor143 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Location:
    USA
  8. mtbdudex macrumors 68000

    mtbdudex

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2007
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    #8
    Lot's of photos, too many to make individual comments.
    -did you shoot in RAW and computer PP or all JPEG w/in camera PP?

    Try this:
    Put your camera on spot mode (or some other mode than the everything exposure mode - experiment), compose the pict & press halfway, note the settings, turn to manual mode with those settings and take the pict.
    Should help get exposure for the area you want. Check LCD to see if exposed like you want. adjust the manual settings if needed.

    FWIW, I came across this review Canon 70-300 F4-5.6 IS USM v Canon 70-200 F4 L IS USM http://www.pbase.com/lightrules/73v72f4is
     
  9. stagi macrumors 65816

    stagi

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    #9
    Some of your compositions seem a little static. I would try taking the focus point off the middle selection and move it to the far sides. As an exercise put it far left for a little while and make yourself find interesting compositions on that side, then do it on the other side.
     
  10. Chappers macrumors 68020

    Chappers

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2003
    Location:
    At home
    #10
    I think you should get linked to a site like Flickr and ask people to go there to give opinion. There is so many here its difficult to judge.

    Secondly - post the ones you think are good. As in my opinion, a photo of a lions rear as it walks away is never going to score points - unless you happen to be another lion and fancy "the lion rear of the year" photo :D

    Zoo's are always difficult - as you have cage etc in the way - you need to generally think about back ground and foreground when you take any photo.

    Don't give up - practice practice practice
     
  11. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #11
    The airplane is about the only thing that's "wild" here, but I'll offer some critique-

    Shooting in zoos, you should *always* pay attention to the bars, fences, cages, and other man-made objects and if they're not incorporated purposefully in to the picture then look for an angle, distance or focus point that keeps them out of the frame or minimizes their impact.

    Cluttered backgrounds or groups of creatures rarely make for good photographs unless the grouping itself is photogenic or there is unique or interesting behavior or a good focal point and the group doesn't distract from it.

    Always try to give animals "room" to look into the frame- try to avoid the central focus point and instead put the creature's head to the side opposite of where they're looking.

    Pay attention to branches/grasses in the foreground as well as what's in the background.

    Shoot from as low a perspective as possible for most wildlife.

    Pay attention to the eyes, take the shot when they're looking at you or at something that gives a good composition.

    Take fewer shots, press the shutter for great moments, not just any look at a creature, or every move it makes.

    Anything where the creature isn't facing you and looking at you needs to be very compelling in some other way.
     
  12. MattSepeta macrumors 65816

    MattSepeta

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Location:
    375th St. Y
    #12
    I like

    I like the ones of the lion/tiger/big cat thing. They look pretty good.

    There were also a few good flamingo pics.

    However, a bunch of them are not white balanced properly.
     
  13. mattyb240 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 11, 2008
    #13
    As above really. White balance is off in a good few, no real composition in a lot of them, and a lot of "soft" pictures. Try and get out of using shutter priority, if you want to use a priority mode it should be Av.

    But do yourself a favour and go look at a book called "Understanding Exposure" its fantastic and virtually everyone will recommend it to you. Then go and shoot in manual mode!

    You do have some nice shots in there to!
     
  14. Dextor143 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    #14
    Majority of these pics are in Av mode. But thanks for the tips
     
  15. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #15
    First off captive animals are by definition NOT "wildlife".

    So whatever advice was given about equipment for shooting wildlife does not apply to zoos.

    Zoos are certainly eisier in some ways becasue you can get very close and the animals have no where to run to and are basically bored and don't move. But zoos are also very hard places to shoot because of all the man made objects. The trick is to somehow compose around these objects. Also you have to wait for some interesting behaviour. Do both of those and you have a great shot.
     
  16. maddagascar macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2009
    #16
    are these lens any good for "bokeh"..or any type of macro shot?
     
  17. glowfly macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    #17
    the picture i like the most is the one with a bright green background aand a sparrow .... actually that specific picture can be considered as a conceptual art as well , the eagle ones are good too ... try to capture more of colors ...
     
  18. Dextor143 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    #18
    Actually that is my fav as well.

    Thanks
     

Share This Page