PM Theresa May gives the go-ahead to build giant U.K. nuclear power plant

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by aaronvan, Sep 15, 2016.

  1. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    #26
    Nuclear requires constant mining, with diminishing stores of accessible ore. Solar (along with other renewables) is a solution that over the long term will result in a leveling off of resource extraction as we hit the point where we are fulfilling our energy needs.

    I'm looking at the long haul, and nuclear isn't it. Renewables will clearly be more than enough as prices continue to dramatically drop.
    --- Post Merged, Sep 15, 2016 ---
    78% of the US's spent fuel is in storage pools. The repurposing is miniscule.

    http://www.nrc.gov/waste/spent-fuel-storage/faqs.html
     
  2. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #27
    The point is the disasters have long lasting and potentially wide ranging effects. Correct me if I am wrong, but aren't there places in the UK wehre livestock cannot graze due to the Chernobyl fallout?

    EDIT: Apparent the ban, which apparently was based on testing sheep for radioactivity as they went to market, was lifted in 2012.

    All the designs that have had accidents were state of the art at the time. I would hope the new designs are safer, but suppose they merely introduce new vulnerabilities. Why rely on the Chinese for expensive, potentially dangerous, centralised nuclear power when there are alternatives that do not carry the same risks for the worst-case scenario? Also, as the Japanese found out, problems in one reactor can cause problems in adjacent reactors. If there is an accident, even a radioactive plum limited to the facility would shut electricity production down. This decision makes no sense economically, environmentally, or strategically. May has chosen foreign technology rather than developing UK technologies that make sense for the country. Scotland has a lot of experience in offshore facilities, and it would make sense to put that expertise to use for wind and tidal power.
     
  3. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #28
    She wants to return to a system where certain schools can pick and choose which students they take on the basis of an 11+ exam.

    They're called grammar schools, I took the 11+ when I was 11, and failed (with a score of 97%).
    --- Post Merged, Sep 16, 2016 ---
    It also relies on old technology which is not as efficient and doesn't deal in anyway with the production of nuclear waste, like the newer technologies do.

    I'd imagine quite a lot of Tory donors are in the energy business though, so its no wonder she took this terrible decision.
     
  4. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #29
    Frankly I blame a lack of competence. They are politicians after all.
     
  5. yaxomoxay macrumors 68040

    yaxomoxay

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    #30
    Mmm she mentioned that she wasn't going towards grammar schools
     
  6. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #31
  7. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    #32
  8. tshrimp macrumors 6502

    tshrimp

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    #33
    Not free. The government is already starting to tax it. And when I looked at doing it, it was not going to be able to provide all my needed electricity, so I would still need to pull from the grid. Solar is very dependent on your location in the US, the direction you house points, and how much physical roof you have.
     
  9. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    #34
    You realize that "the government" you speak of taxing solar is local and state governments that are doing it on behalf of the private electricity utilities right? They lobbied hard to get that rammed through.
     
  10. Bug-Creator macrumors 6502a

    Bug-Creator

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    #35
  11. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    #36
    Those studies never reflect the externalities of damage and health issues (let alone emissions) caused by the mining operations for nuclear fuel. Not only that, but every nuclear regulatory agency on the planet has reported that we've essentially depleted all the "easily extractable" ore needed, so mining operations will have to get more complex and destructive as time goes on to get the same amount of fuel required.

    On top of that, not a single insurance company or bank on the planet has agreed to finance the building of a new power plant since the 70's without a 100% guarantee backing from the respective government. Meaning, these projects are 100% taxpayer funded (at the end of the day) and the profits are privatized. It's a centralized power distribution model (not fit for the 21st century) that only serves as a wealth extraction mechanism when looked at from the macro level.
     
  12. yaxomoxay macrumors 68040

    yaxomoxay

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    #37
    I listened to the speech, that's it. I really don't follow much of what happens in the UK, just in general. As I mentioned earlier, I have no idea how the schooling system works there and I usually find dangerous going into internal affairs of another country. I have no idea if grammar schools in general are good or bad etc.
    --- Post Merged, Sep 16, 2016 ---
    Lol, no. In this case it's pure ignorance (mine) of a system. But that's usually why I ask questions, or post stuff here even at the cost of being ridiculed. It's the only way to learn.
     
  13. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

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    #38
    Nuclear powerplants have come along way. In a country like the US and I assume Great Britain, there are so many regulations and requirements and government approvals it can take a decade to design a plant.

    If everyone is cutting off their coal powerplants you need something to bridge the gap between current technology and future renewable technology.

    The average onshore wind turbine produced 2.5-3.0 megawatts. An offshore turbine on average 3.5 MW. Solar farms are increasing in size, but even a 27 megawatt plant takes up 160 acres of land, such as the recent one built in Germany. We still don't have an efficient way to store that energy either for downtime.

    A coal plant on the other hand is 500-600 MW on average, some even greater. Nuclear plants range from <1,000 to >8,000 MW.

    In terms of bridging technology I think nuclear is the best way to go. There are risks involved but a properly designed and located plant should surpress those issues. There have been many nuclear reactors running around the world in various forms without catostrophic issue for decades.

    I believe the US is still in a power deficit, I can't speak for the Uk. I was in NYC over the summer during a heat wave and the power company prophylactically was cutting power to Bronx and Queens neighborhood's to keep power running elsewhere in the city. It's 2016 and we can't handle powering one of our biggest metro areas?
     
  14. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    #39
    Good on you, admitting ignorance of a topic (which is not a derogatory term, it merely means you haven't learned about it at all) is a great way to be open to it with a clean slate. Just to be clear my post wasn't meant to be a slight in any way, it was more of a general statement that can be applied to literally every politician regardless of country.
     
  15. yaxomoxay macrumors 68040

    yaxomoxay

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    #40
    Understood, it wasn't taken as a personal "attack" or anything. ;)
     
  16. zin macrumors 6502

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    #41
    Wow, that's astonishing to read. Rolling blackouts are things you read about in places like India, not New York. Is the power utility in New York government-owned or private?
     
  17. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #42
    In my view they're unfair.

    Im sure other people will disagree
     
  18. yaxomoxay macrumors 68040

    yaxomoxay

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    #43
    honest question: unfair to whom?
     
  19. tshrimp macrumors 6502

    tshrimp

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    #44
    Yep. I am lucky I am in a state that doesn't tax, nor have they entertained it ....yet. There were great incentives from the state and local government where I am at, but unfortunately most of the incentives are gone (actually still some, but very hard to get), so solar is too expensive for the non wealthy for now. They make solar shingles now that are nice, an hope those go main stream soon.
     
  20. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #45
    It is being built by a largely state owned company EDF.
     
  21. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    #46
    Luckily as production continues to ramp up dramatic (a trend that is not going to dissipate for decades) the costs will only drop faster over time. Sometime in the next decade fossil fuels simply won't be feasible economically, and thats with the ridiculous subsidies they enjoy.

    There is no stopping renewables from taking over fossil fuels as far as energy production is concerned, its just a matter of time. My concern is what are we doing about moving from petroleum based products, a massive industry that can't simply fade away as nearly everything you touch everyday is made using petroleum in the process. That should be a major focus of Federal R&D funding grants....not to be sold off to corporations of course.
     
  22. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

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    #47
    I believe it's private. Con Edison being one of the biggest providers anyway which is not a publically held company.

    They were shutting off the power to prevent rolling blackouts, but yes, it's interesting. And I imagine the people getting their power shut off in the Bronx and Queens weren't the people without air conditioning to start off if you catch my drift.
     
  23. zin macrumors 6502

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    United Kingdom
    #48
    I know that. I meant it should be our government doing the work and selling the surplus supply. The strike price for this deal is extortionate.

    Here in the UK we've become experts at enriching the state-owned companies of other countries...
     

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