Police Pepper-Spray Black Teen in His Own House

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by rdowns, Oct 8, 2014.

  1. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #1
    This must be why Santa Claus is white. :rolleyes:


    http://www.mediaite.com/online/poli...een-in-his-own-house-mistake-him-for-burglar/
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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  3. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

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    #3
    Why couldn't the neighbors mind their own business?
     
  4. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #4
    I don't think the neighbors did anything wrong. They saw someone who they didn't know or recognize entering a side door of their neighbor's house and called the cops.

    Not sure why the cops didn't try and call the owners, etc.
     
  5. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

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    #5
    How were the police supposed to get the owner's cell numbers? Not to many houses have a sign on the door saying who to call. The home number might be listed but the police already knew they weren't home.
     
  6. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #6
    The kid or neighbors could have provided the number.
     
  7. aerok macrumors 65816

    aerok

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    #7
    Hence the importance of knowing of knowing your neighbors.
     
  8. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

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    #8
    Heck, the neighbors didn't know they had a foster kid. Can't be too close.
     
  9. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #9
    Well, how long has this kid lived in that house? That neighborhood? I'm pretty sure the neighbor should have seen him a few times at least. Sounds like an elitist neighbor who doesn't think the kid belongs in the neighborhood.

    I ain't buddy-buddy with my neighbor, but at least I recognize everyone who lives next door.
     
  10. rhett7660 macrumors G5

    rhett7660

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    #10
    Exactly. This could have turned out a lot different. I would also like to hear if they gave him commands etc but he refused to cooperate with them, hence the pepper spray etc.
     
  11. giantfan1224 macrumors 6502a

    giantfan1224

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    #11
    When I was a kid, my uncle came to our house once while we weren't home to pick up some furniture that my parents were giving him. Neighbors thought he was robbing us so they called the police. I can't really fault the neighbors on this one. In fact, it's probably a good idea to let your neighbors know that you're going to be having a foster kid in the house. My neighbors currently have a foreign exchange student living with them and they let us know beforehand so we wouldn't think an unknown person was hanging around possibly up to no good.

    ----------

    So you're saying the neighbor probably knew the kid belonged there but called the police because he saw it as a chance to harass the kid? Come on.
     
  12. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    #12
    Police departments have computers that have a internet connection to a database that lists everything about everyone. Im sure they could find a phone number.
     
  13. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

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    #13
    You give the police far too much credit. Trust me, it isn't that easy to locate a cell phone number for a home owner.
     
  14. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #14
    Not to mention that any such system that they could use would be prone to error sue to things like similar names, people moving, lack of address associated with numbers, cell phones being registered to business, etc...

    Not dependable enough.
     
  15. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #15
    Didn't recognize him or didn't recognize him and he was black?

    They have no clue who lives there, but, they see a black kid and call the police. Don't worry-- I won't call it "racism". Like the kids say -- whatever.


    But, why would the police pepper spray a kid who said he lived there? Easy enough to check. He wasn't going anywhere-- he was expecting them to leave his house. For some reason, when people call the police, they apparently feel they have to do something, even if it is irrational. Why is that?
     
  16. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

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    #16
    Maybe the part where it says that he got confused and angry with the police had something to do with why he got sprayed? Neighbors called reporting a break in.
     
  17. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #17
    At least the police didn't shoot the kid.

    Its hard to really find fault here. Nosy neighbors? Or just people trying to do the right thing?

    Yes, I'm sure a lot of stereotypes were at work once the cops showed up and found a black teenager in the house. Obviously that conversation didn't go very well. Of course, it didn't go very well when it happened to Henry Louis Gates in his own house either.

    So not much has changed?
     
  18. sodapop1 Suspended

    sodapop1

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    #18
    The problem is there never was any break in. According to the article, the side door was left open for him to use when he returned from school. I could see if the neighbors witnessed a stranger forcefully opening a door or a window but to them, an unfamiliar black teenager entering through an open side door in their mind equates to someone breaking into a home. Would they have called the cops if it were an unfamiliar white teenager they witnessed simply entering through a side door?
     
  19. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #19
    I am going to find fault with the police, and, the Gates controversy fits right in. In both cases, someone is mistaken for an intruder by a neighbor. The police show up and confront a person who is in their own home-- castle doctrine and all that. The police more or less force their way in on the basis that a crime may be in progress. The person continues to assert that they are in their own home and get angry with the police. Proof is offered and the police proceed anyway because now they feel that the person is guilty of disrespecting a police officer.

    What should have happened? Once the police realized their mistake, they should have apologized and left. Why wouldn't the police expect someone get angry when the police violate the sanctity of their home?

    While racial stereotypes obviously triggered the situation in both cases, the real problem is that the police can't seem to stand down. I've been in such situations, and, I've had family members in that situation as well.
     
  20. rhett7660 macrumors G5

    rhett7660

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    #20
    Yeah that would do it!
     
  21. rdowns thread starter macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #21

    You wouldn't be angry if the police entered your home and thought you were robbing the place? What would you have done, serve them coffee and doughnuts?
     
  22. sodapop1 Suspended

    sodapop1

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    #22
    I'm not sure the police were at fault in either of the cases. As much as I agree that each situation was triggered because of racial stereotypes, the police still have the duty to verify that the alleged suspect should rightfully be in the home. I understand how degrading it feels to be the alleged suspect in that situation but being uncooperative with the cops is foolish and only escalates the situation. The best thing to do is to show them your ID and move on with your life.

    As for the neighbors, I do believe in each case that the police should have seriously debated giving them a citation for filing a false police report. In both cases, instead of reporting what they actually witnessed, they decided to embellish their story in order to paint the alleged suspect in the worse possible light. Witnessing someone entering a home though an unlocked door does not fit the definition of breaking an entry by any stretch of the imagination.
     
  23. jkcerda macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #23
    Plenty of people leave their doors unlocked while they are there. If you don't belong there, you are at the least trespassing I agree you should pick your battles. The "kid " in the story looks old enough to have I.D.
     
  24. sodapop1 Suspended

    sodapop1

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    #24
    Agreed and if you witness some activity that you perceive to be suspicious and feel you should report it, report what you actually witnessed versus what you drew as a conclusion. The police have a totally different mindset when responding to a simple trespass call versus a reported robbery or home invasion.
     
  25. Southern Dad macrumors 68000

    Southern Dad

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    #25
    The police have to act on the information that they have, at the time. The neighbors thought that he was burglarizing the house. They reported it. When the police arrived and he got confused, then angry it didn't help the situation. Simply asking if he lived there doesn't really work. Burglars aren't likely to be truthful.

    When I was growing up we had numerous foster kids in our home. Big difference is that we knew all our neighbors and they knew us. We also had respect for adults, especially police. If one of us had got angry with the officers, we'd have been more afraid of what would happen after they left.
     

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108 October 8, 2014