Prime Minister of Australia Stands Down After Being Challenged by Party

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Chundles, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #1
    There's been a call for a leadership spill with the once "most popular PM" ever about to be booted. It'll take a miracle for him to survive.

    Looks like we're about to get our first woman PM, and a ranga at that.
     
  2. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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  3. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #3
    Well it's done. Julia Gillard is the new Australian PM. Amazing how quick Rudd went from record popularity to no confidence, based on a appalling climate change backflip and an incredibly poorly explained and sold mining tax. The latter was always going to be hard with the deep pockets of the mining companies but in the end it was the final nail.

    Anyway best of luck to Gillard. She'll have a lot to prove before the election, especially after spending so much time in rudd's shadow.
     
  4. bobber205 macrumors 68020

    bobber205

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    #4
    lol. Foreign politics sounds so tame and lame. :p
     
  5. sammich macrumors 601

    sammich

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    It's a shame that Kevin didn't sell that mining plan the second he announced it. I do play for the other team 'right now', but not a big fan of my team leader tbh. It'll be an interesting contest, the monkey verses the red head.
     
  6. Ivan P macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #6
    As big a douche that Abbott can be at times, I gotta agree with him that Labor's treatment of Rudd was terrible. There's definitely a lot going against him - climate change, the totally bungled home insulation scheme (Garrett damn well informed him about the safety issues many times) and obviously the mining tax. Regardless of the mistakes though, I can't help but feel sorry for Rudd. In his concession speech he did seem to admit to making mistakes without actually saying it, though of course that doesn't make it alright. But the ALP definitely could have handled it better, like calling an election for example. At least last time Labor ousted it's leader (Billy Hughes, 1915) they had an election at the same time (though their bad luck that Hughes went and formed his own party and formed government for another 8 years after :p)
    However, even though I did express some dissatisfaction about Abbott at the start of my post, I would much rather see the Libs win the upcoming election. During the whole mess of press conferences today I couldn't help but feel a little disgusted at how smug Gillard looked. Yes, she just became Prime Minister (and the first female one at that, so a huge achievement), but just her look, body language, etc, through the whole thing - given the circumstances of how she got the top job I think she looked a bit pathetic. Though the reason I'll be voting against them is because their policies suck. But whatever, I'm rambling now.

    She has a tough few months ahead to prove herself before the next election, but I'll be voting for the Libs. Was always a Howard supporter even though I was way too young to vote back then, I never wanted Rudd to win the election to begin with.

    In a country where mining is one of the biggest influences on the economy and employment, what Rudd's government was proposing (the super mining tax) was lethal. Of course you wouldn't understand.
     
  7. bobber205 macrumors 68020

    bobber205

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  8. jake.f macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Prime Minister of Australia Stands Down After Being Challenged by Party

    Kevin Rudd, prime minster of Australia has stood down and given power to once deputy PM, Julia Gillard. There was to be a vote in the party on the issue but Rudd stood down before. Gillard was sworn in early this afternoon.

    Link
     
  9. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #9
    I absolutely hate how this all went down. If she wanted to be PM, she should have challenged for leadership of the party on the eve of an election. Instead, she's PM, citizens didn't vote for her, AND she has ginger hair. Nobody trusts gingers. Nobody.
     
  10. sammich macrumors 601

    sammich

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    #10
    Hold your horses. Kevin Rudd was taking a beating in the voter polls and was basically the underdog. This is coming down from an almost historical high approval rating for any Australian PM before only a few months ago. Kevin knew he was done for, the Labor party would've replaced him soon or later as it would give them a better chance at winning the upcoming election.
     
  11. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #11
    That is not how our parliamentary system works. We elect parties rather than individuals. The parties themselves elect the leaders.

    Frankly I'm pretty embarassed that this is opinion is so prevalent after yesterday. Australians have a terrible understanding of their own parliamentary system. It's not even like this is the first time it has happened....

    And there's already a thread about this.
     
  12. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #12
    Gillard seems like she's a reasonably sensible person and can be effective as a leader. Hopefully she can make good on some initial statements that she will put carbon pricing back on the agenda and address some of the other issues that led Rudd's reputation to muddy.
     
  13. Queso macrumors G4

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    #13
    I wish the people of Australia much better luck than we had with our first female Prime Minister.
     
  14. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #14
    I'm not Australian. ;)

    All I know is that Rudd went from being challenged, and 12-16 hours later, he was no longer PM. That quick. That brutal. I know that politics isn't exactly a career for the faint of heart, but the guy a chance to make more of a stand. A few hours after the challenge, he had to give a speech to save his career? He was the most popular PM over the past 30 years just a few months ago. He deserved a few days.

    I'm not saying I don't like Gillard. I just think this went about the wrong way.
     
  15. Ivan P macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

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    #15
    This is what people don't understand. I'm only 19 and yet I seem to be the only person out of everyone I know that understands what we actually vote for (and I haven't even had the chance to vote in a state or federal election yet!). What Labor did was controversial, yes, but in the end Australians elected Labor into power so they're technically within their rights to do what they did (unfortunately 99.99% of people think they're merely voting for a person).

    It's one of the two biggest things about elections that I've found Australians don't really understand - the other being the 'issue' of "compulsory" voting. It isn't compulsory to cast a vote at all, it's just compulsory to attend a polling place and get your name marked off. People, I tell 'ya.

    Brutal? Yes, definitely. But it's not like the situation within the ALP wasn't known. The news has been reporting for weeks, if not at least a month or so, that there was likely to be a huge leadership battle within the party. Rudd pretty much left it until it was at breaking point to comment on it, though.
     
  16. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #16
    It was not quick and brutal by any means with the exception of the final death. The floundering for political oxygen on the back of some awful decisions has been going on for months. Ever since his backflip on emissions trading his popularity has been in the doldrums. He was given every chance to redeem himself and failed spectacularly. Personally I think the mining tax was absolutely the wrong issue to take up for redemption. It was too much against a too well armed and financed opponent. Combined with the fact that labour did an absolutely terrible job selling it. His time was up. He had to go. He was a liability with an election bearing down.
     
  17. toolbox macrumors 68020

    toolbox

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    #17
    I absolutly agree!!!

    They stabbed the bloke in the back. The australian public voted for him back in 07 i think it was. We should have the right right as voters to vote him out of office. Not like the way it went down. I don't follow politics but dam
     
  18. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #18
    This is why countries have constitutions... And your people chose the way of governance you have... I don't understand in what way the parliamentary system was some evil foisted on you? (FWIW, trust us... it's way too hard to get bad politicians out of office here in the US, where we do not use your system.)
     
  19. King Mook Mook macrumors 6502

    #19
    For this, I disagree with you. While it looks good on a PowerPoint to say that in the Westminster System of Government that we have you only elect a local member of a political party, who then in turn elect the Prime Minister, it is not the political reality in which we live. Realistically, people vote for the person who they want to be Prime Minister. There is no doubt about it, and due to this, I think that if there is a new Prime Minister, an election should be immediately called so the people can decide who they want to lead them. It would give whoever won a mandate to govern and enact whichever policies they were elected on. We did not vote for Julia Gillard for her policies, we voted for Kevin Rudd and his policies, and if Julia wants to enact her policies let the people decide.

    For this, I completely agree. No one is forcing you to vote for anyone, if you wish you can go to the polling place, get your name marked off, and then rip the ballet paper in two and walk away. I, frankly, see no argument against compulsory voting as it accurately reflects the will of the people and does not compel anyone to actually vote, yet we still get a 98% (or thereabouts) formal voting rate. It shows that if people are given the fair opportunity to vote and a little encouragement, they will.

    And I agree entirely with this. What they have done to Kevin is just awful, cruel and completely brutal. And to see the Unions gloating afterwards is just awful, and I think, shows the attachment (to put it nicely) between Gillard and the Unions. In fact, I actually have met his son, Marcus, who happens to go to my school, and he is an awfully friendly person, and I feel so sorry for what has happened to him and his family. He'll now probably have to leave Canberra (and in the middle of Year 11 too, what is essentially part of our HSC or SAT years).

    King Mook Mook
     
  20. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #20
    No they didn't. The party gave him ample time to turn things around and he failed. He ultimately lost their confidence. What played out in the media is only a small fraction of what has been going on. If you think Rudd only found out about all this yesterday morning I've got a bridge to sell you. The alternative, as you claim, would be an example of Rudd being a terrible leader and not having a clue what was going on in his own party.
     

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