Qualifying American nationality.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Happybunny, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #1
    I am not out to start any arguments, honestly. But I am genuinely interested.

    Please remember English is not my first language, so the tone of the words might be incorrect.

    When I lived in the USA for 18 months, in White Plains NY, in the early 1980's. Back then nearly everybody qualified their American nationality, they were always 'Italian' Americans or 'Irish' Americans. There was always a great emphases placed on the immigrant origin of their families. I also remember that there was a lot of different parades and processions in NYC, for the various nationalities, in which the people taking part displayed great pride in. Mexican, Irish, Italian and Puerto Rican parades, you hardly saw an American flag I remember.


    Does this still happen?
     
  2. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    #2
    To a degree. I've never referred to myself as Irish-American. I've always called myself Irish.

    Pureblood and damned proud of it.
     
  3. likemyorbs macrumors 68000

    likemyorbs

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    Sort of. Many people are proud of their national origins, but they're still proud to be american, it's not mutually exclusive. Also, many Americans are of mixed ancestry and can't even track their ancestors to one specific country. My family is from Ukraine/Russia, i really don't think much about it though. I can speak Russian because my parents taught it to me, but i consider myself American first, my ancestry is basically irrelevant. You should also know that when people participate in these ancestral pride events, they're also celebrating the diversity of our country.
     
  4. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    I can.

    Here's my 4th great grandfather. He was with George Washington when Cornwallis surrendered. His father came from Cork,Ireland
     

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  5. likemyorbs macrumors 68000

    likemyorbs

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    Wow! that is some cool stuff
     
  6. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    Sorry I meant Cornwallis.


    Ya. Pretty cool. I'l eligible to join the DSAR. Never have done it though. It's to snooty for me. Ha!

    so if anybody ever calls me un-american well.. They can kiss you know what.

    I come from a long.long line of military people.
     
  7. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #7
    Being proud of where you are from makes no sense.

    hence all this african-american, irish-american, british-american stuff is just nonsense.
     
  8. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    Really?

    It shows all of us that despite where we come from in the world; despite where our ancestors are from, we can still be one nationality in this country: American.

    It also gets us the ability to learn from these various cultures, and explore how integral a part they play in the makeup of this country.

    turning a blind eye to it is a slap in the face to what this country was founded upon.

    BL.
     
  9. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    Yes. Really. Having pride in being born within a certain geographic boundary is completely irrational.

    What exactly have you done to be proud of? Born with a certain skin color?

    Oh man I'm so proud that i was born on this side of an imaginary geographic line that somebody I've never heard of determined.

    Which is why everybody should call themselves Americans, and nothing else.

    You can do that without relying on being proud of something that you have no control or input over.

    Being proud of something like that leads to the possibility of your "pride" being hurt, and in turn, violence associated with it.

    This country was founded on getting a fresh start. no matter where you came from, what you did, who you were, you came to the United States and you were a new person.

    Bringing along baggage like your "pride" only results in violence, stereotypes, and prejudice.

    Trying to say that you are somehow different because of your race, or religion, or creed, does you, your community, and humanity a disservice.

    You're a human being. That's all that matters. Be proud of your accomplishments in life. Not the expression of your genes or the random area you were born into.
     
  10. steviem macrumors 68020

    steviem

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    Where were your parents and a few generations of grandparents born though?
     
  11. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    I've always thought the same. You can be proud of your accomplishments but not of anything to which you had no say, like where you are born or what your government does.
     
  12. Fazzy macrumors 6502

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    Theres a difference between being interested in your culture and having a holier than thou attitude. A fine line, but a difference nonetheless.
     
  13. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    #13
    I don't have a problem with cherishing your cultural heritage or celebrating how you were raised up or whatever. But calling yourself something different than American, implies that you're somehow different. That you're not just any American, you're an Irish-American.
     
  14. Peace macrumors Core

    Peace

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    Tennessee and Virginia.
     
  15. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    The problem is that too many people forget that we are all human beings first and foremost. I guess it's just part of human nature to want to sub-divide ourselves based on everything from skin color to ancestry to whether or not one lives on the 'right side' of the tracks.


    Lethal
     
  16. Sedulous, Mar 2, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012

    Sedulous macrumors 68020

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    I know I qualify myself as Swedish-American + German-American + Dutch-American. It takes a long time to say but totally identifies me because all I care about is taking over the world with little chocolate meatballs.
     
  17. Vudoo macrumors 6502a

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    I consider myself American even though I wasn't born in the US.
     
  18. bradl macrumors 68040

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    nobody said anything about a certain Geographic boundary. Here you are pulling worse out of your backside to justify your argument.

    I'm not even going to justify my accomplishments by answering this baiting of a question. But I will say that because of who I am, because of the qualities of the blood I have from my ancestors, I can not only show how much of a part they played in the making of this country and the sustainability of this country, but how they influenced cultures and customs we now have. Furthermore, it is that very same blood that fuels my people's resolve to right the omissions in our history books about assumptions and disenfranchisements that were committed by people of other skin colours. That history, cultures and customs can never be taken away because of a simple skin colour.

    It's really sad that you have to ask that type of question; but it is clearly able to see that you don't, nor possibly will understand it. Hopefully, in time, you will.. but not today.

    The Dilbert rule is beginning to apply to you.

    Maybe not. There were people here before the lot of people who call themselves "Americans" got off the boat. Again, something you should already know.

    Tell that to a refugee.

    Wrong. You can be proud of something like this, with relative ease. It resorts to violence when you assume that that nationality gives you an unequal advantage over some other nationality or race. That's what brought us Jim Crow, The Nazis, and the Civil Rights Act.

    this nation was founded on Religious freedom (freedom from religious persecution), not being a 'new person' or getting a fresh start. No matter where our ancestors came from, no matter what they did there, they could come here, be free from being persecuted on grounds of religion (that has branched out since then), and live how you want to live. That does not mean that you still couldn't take pride in where you are from. I don't know why it is so hard for you to understand that.

    You can be proud of BOTH. Because if it were not for such ethnic diversity, The United States of America would not be the melting pot that it is today.

    BL.
     
  19. interrobang macrumors 6502

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    I think that this is far more common in areas with more first-generation immigrants (eg. New York City, San Francisco, etc.) even if the person in question is not a first-generation immigrant.
     
  20. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    It was just an add-in making fun of the ridiculousness of nationalism. It supplements my argument. Nothing more.


    I don't care about your accomplishments. There is no need to list them and I'm not baiting.

    Anything you do is the product of your mind and your abilities. Not your blood, not your culture, not your skin color.

    Your culture doesn't make you a great swimmer

    Your culture doesn't make you a great lover

    Your culture doesn't make you a great writer

    YOU make those things true.

    What I really hope, is that in time you're realize there is a difference between accepting and celebrating culture and being proud of it. Perhaps being condescending is part of your culture?


    Nope. I'm pointing out how silly the idea of belonging to a group of people based on some imaginary line is.


    Who cares?


    Tell them that it's irrational to be proud of something they were born into? Ok.


    Yeah, and you're acting irrational.

    It resorts to violence because people equate being proud with being the best, or being good.


    This country was founded on self determination. Religious freedom was why the pilgrims came here. Not why we fought the Revolutionary War.


    If you want racial tension, bigotry, and hatred. Sure.

    that's like me saying I'm proud to be white because Bill Gates invented Windows.

    Who says that being a melting pot is good? Why is it good? Who determines that?
     
  21. Sedulous macrumors 68020

    Sedulous

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    I agree. If anything we should work hard to eliminate the walls established by cultural differences.
     
  22. NutsNGum macrumors 68030

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    Judging by the accents of people at my university, I imagine alot of people from the Glasgow/Paisley area seem to feel the same way.
     
  23. Liquorpuki macrumors 68020

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    I'm Asian American. I don't know about other groups but "Asian American" and all its subcategories have political significance.

    The term was coined at Berkeley in the 60's because back then, everybody looked at Asians and thought we all just arrived on a boat and didn't know how to speak English. Asians were stuck with a foreigner stigma no matter if they were born here or not. So Asian American meant, I'm Asian but I'm also an American because Asians can be Americans too. It did not mean, I am using this phrase because I think I'm special and want to segregate myself further. It was reactionary.

    I'm not gonna get into it but there's still a ton of institutionalized conflation between Asian nationals and Asian Americans so I think the label still needs to be used.
     
  24. eric/ Guest

    eric/

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    No, calling Asian nationals Asian is silly. They're Chinese, Japanese, etc... and you're just an American.
     
  25. jeremy h macrumors 6502

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    Eh? Aren't we all actually African?
     

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