Quick Question: Are iPhones Hygenic?

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
Maybe I've been doing this wrong all along, but how are you supposed to hold the iPhone? Is it supposed to touch your face when you're holding it to your ear? Or do you just hold it by the metal band, suspended in the air? iPhones look so clean in the commercials, but theyre actually very dirty items. What would happen to your face if the touch screen touched it?
 

scaredpoet

macrumors 604
Apr 6, 2007
6,626
342
iPhones are as clean as you make them, or as dirty as you make them. just like any other phone out there. If your face or hands are dirty, guess what? Your iPhone will be too.

The nice thing is, a simple microfiber cloth cleans 'em right up.
 

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
Uh, well, you could put your ear to a flip phone without it touching your jaw. This is what I do with the iPhone. My iPhone is naked and it must be wiped down several times daily because of the sweat and fingerprints.

But I'd like to know how you do it (people on this forum).
 

magamo

macrumors 6502
Apr 6, 2009
416
5
I use mine just like any other phone that doesn't have the fancy "i" letter. Just take out the "i" from your iPhone and put it back to your "Hygenic". Don't forget the i before e rule either.
 

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
I'm going to go back and watch some Apple commercials. I don't know if they encourage you to rest it on your face.

I don't think I've ever seen anyone talk on the iPhone normally in these ads.
 

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
Huh.
What are you asking again?
This is odd, because I can't find a single advertisement of the iPhone with a person actually talking on the phone. That is so strange.

My question is this: Are iPhones hygenic?

How are you supposed to hold the iPhone? Is it supposed to touch your face when you're holding it to your ear? Or do you just hold it by the metal band, suspended in the air?
 

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
From the web...
"Families who used glass or plastic cutting board surfaces were close to twice as likely to contact salmonella."

Oh, no...I'm going to wash my face right away!!
 

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
There's been numerous reports of iPhone and iPad glass crawling with bacteria and viruses.

A study done by Charles W. Hendricks says that a 'natural population of heterotrophic bacteria, including enterics, was observed to sorb to glass surfaces and multiply during the continuous culture of river water.'

In fact, after I bought an iPhone, I've gotten sick 3 times, most than I ever have. I got 2 very bad colds and a ringworm.

I'm going to look into this, because I'm scared now.
 

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
Now you’re claiming the iPhone is giving you ringworm????
I never said that. This is a very serious inquiry. The iPhone is dirty. And it gets dirty very quick. I have never seen an advertisement in which Apple shows a person talking on the iPhone holding against their ear. You can't ignore how strange that is.

This has force me to question myself, does bacteria grow at a greater rate in glass than plastic or metal?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

emjaycee18

macrumors regular
Jun 14, 2010
191
4
From the web...
"Families who used glass or plastic cutting board surfaces were close to twice as likely to contact salmonella."

Oh, no...I'm going to wash my face right away!!
The reason that this is true is because that bacteria are harbored in the cuts that are created in the plastic board, not because plastic is less hygienic. If you had a smooth glass surface and a smooth plastic surface they would harbor the same amount of bacteria. This is example is irrelevant.
 

stickybuns

macrumors 6502
Oct 22, 2011
384
0
Yes, your iPhone was assembled in an environment that is as clean/sterile as possible. With such tiny internal components, all smartphones need to be manufactured in dust free spaces. Likewise, oil from the workers' fingers can be transferred (imagine getting a fingerprint on the inside of the glass!), so gloves are worn.

Yes, as with any item that is held close to the face, germs may be transferred to the surface. According to the Mayo Clinic, flu germs can survive up to 48 hours outside the human body. Wash your hands and face with soap and water, especially after sneezing, and avoid sharing your phone with folks who show signs of being ill. If you are the sole user of the phone, any germs present on your phone will likely be your own.

The actors in the iPhone commercials hold the phone away from their faces because the marketing department at Apple would like potential customers to see the phone as clearly as possible.
 
Last edited:

cyks

macrumors 68020
Jul 24, 2002
2,089
7
Westchester County, NY
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9B179 Safari/7534.48.3)

motoleo said:
Definitely trolling. Especially if you have seen the stuff he's been posting lately.
That's not possible. It's a quick question. Come on, guys.
Considering how gorgeous the hands are in the commercials, I'd LOVE to see their face and how they hold their phones.
 

coolhands

macrumors regular
Oct 18, 2011
195
0
Hahaha I am going to be honest, this thread actually made me laugh out loud. Seriously man, your blaming your iPhone on a sickness??
Take some iMedicine to get rid of your iCold so you can still use your iPhone.
 

TallGuy1970

macrumors 6502
Jun 16, 2010
323
0
My answer to the OP's question would be no. In fact, I am starting to see advertisements for new cleaning/charging stations. They use UV lights to sanitize your phone while it charges. Cool idea actually!
 

motoleo

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jan 27, 2012
904
1
There's been numerous reports of iPhone and iPad glass crawling with bacteria and viruses.

A study done by Charles W. Hendricks says that a 'natural population of heterotrophic bacteria, including enterics, was observed to sorb to glass surfaces and multiply during the continuous culture of river water.'

In fact, after I bought an iPhone, I've gotten sick 3 times, most than I ever have. I got 2 very bad colds and a ringworm.

I'm going to look into this, because I'm scared now.
Yes, your iPhone was assembled in an environment that is as clean/sterile as possible. With such tiny internal components, all smartphones need to be manufactured in dust free spaces. Likewise, oil from the workers' fingers can be transferred (imagine getting a fingerprint on the inside of the glass!), so gloves are worn.

Yes, as with any item that is held close to the face, germs may be transferred to the surface. According to the Mayo Clinic, flu germs can survive up to 48 hours outside the human body. Wash your hands and face with soap and water, especially after sneezing, and avoid sharing your phone with folks who show signs ill. If you are the sole user of the phone, any germs present on your phone will likely be your own.

The actors in the iPhone commercials hold the phone away from their faces because the marketing department at Apple would like potential customers to see the phone as clearly as possible.
I'm not talking about how it was assembled. But I'm wondering if the iPhone really is a health hazard. I have been sicker than I've ever been in just the few short months I've had this iPhone. And I'm always scared of touching iPads and iPhones because, while they might be clean on TV, they are usually incredibly filthy when you go to touch them. They don't even clean the ones that are on display. Have you seen an iPad lately? The same goes for any tablet. They don't even have the good sense to make it out of antimicrobial glass. Which Corning is developing, I think. But I'm starting to get a little tired of cleaning it 24/7. You see, the glass makes your hands incredible sweaty. So in theory, it's worse than touching money.

Nowhere does Apple tell or show you how to hold the thing. Do they encourage you to put it on your face? I would advise you not do that.
 

cfedu

Suspended
Mar 8, 2009
1,165
1,508
Toronto
The reason that this is true is because that bacteria are harbored in the cuts that are created in the plastic board, not because plastic is less hygienic. If you had a smooth glass surface and a smooth plastic surface they would harbor the same amount of bacteria. This is example is irrelevant.
What if I use my iPad as a cutting board? Just kidding

I'm pretty sure any phone with a smooth touch screen is way more hygienic than a phone with buttons. As long as you clean the phone you should be good. Maybe an iPhone is less hygienic for the sole reason that all your friends want to use it and put there germs on it. Who would really want to use there friends blackberry;)
 

eawmp1

macrumors 601
Feb 19, 2008
4,130
5
FL
Depend on where you put it before you brought it up to your face.

OP, you must not have been alive during the time of public pay phones. You would have had a stroke worrying about those handsets.
 

stickybuns

macrumors 6502
Oct 22, 2011
384
0
An iPhone is no less sanitary than any other glass surfaced device held closely to the face. Germs do not magically appear out of no where. If you are continually being reinfected with a cold virus, you may want to try washing your hands more often.

I am unfamiliar with Charles W. Hendricks. With what institution(s) is he affiliated? Has his work been published in peer reviewed journals? What controls did he use in his study?