Quick question!

MrBullet

macrumors member
Original poster
Oct 18, 2011
78
0
Bristol, UK
Had an issue with my old iPhone 4. Fortunately it was still under warranty and Apple replaced it with a different handset.

My question is; is the handset I was given brand new or a refurbished handset. I am not bothered apart from the battery life seems to be draining a bit faster than my previous iPhone and I thought that would be a sign of a refurbished model.

Thanks,

B
 

Feed Me

macrumors 6502a
Jan 7, 2012
831
6
Location Location
If it came with the full product boxing, etc, then it's a brand new one.
If it didn't, it's a refurb.

Either way, the unit will still have a brand new battery inside it, since Apple replaces the batteries in refurb units with new ones. :)

It can take a few charge cycles for these Lithium polymer batteries to get up to full capacity, so that could be what you're experiencing, either that or it's all in your head.
 

MrBullet

macrumors member
Original poster
Oct 18, 2011
78
0
Bristol, UK
Thanks for your quick reply.

Didn't come fully boxed up because it's only the handset they need to swap, not any of the other components inside the box.

Might just be me getting paranoid. Not really bothered, more interested to see if they dish out new or refurbished models to customers.
 

Applejuiced

macrumors Westmere
Apr 16, 2008
40,672
6,532
At the iPhone hacks section.
Their policy is to replace with refurbished models unless they're all out and will swap out with a new.
Their refurbs are top notch though. I wouldnt think twice about getting a replacement from Apple.
 

rowley

macrumors 6502
Dec 16, 2008
408
1
London, UK
I've have apple replacements, and had no problem.
I think it would be better to get a replacement with new screen and battery, than continue with your issues.
 

iDeviceBlogger

macrumors newbie
Dec 11, 2011
9
0
You could check the serial number on the original box and compare to the one on your phone under General > About.
I've had to send my iPhone 4 in twice. First was for a faulty home button - I got a replacement phone back, second was for a faulty flashlight - got the same handset back repaired.
Hope this is helpful info.
 

MacCheetah3

macrumors 6502a
Nov 14, 2003
533
88
Central MN
Hi
so are the batteries in the refurbished models brand new?
What he said:
Either way, the unit will still have a brand new battery inside it, since Apple replaces the batteries in refurb units with new ones. :)
And... Regarding:
It can take a few charge cycles for these Lithium polymer batteries to get up to full capacity, so that could be what you're experiencing, either that or it's all in your head.
Somewhat debatable with newer Apple portable devices -- I prefer to think it helps -- calibrating your iDevice's power management system could fix your problem, and it won't hurt to try. The process is the same as calibrating the battery in a portable computer. Basically, completely discharge the battery after being fully charged, then fully recharge without stopping the charging process, and than fully discharge again.

As a quick lesson, the process is really about updating the battery information. Performing these full charge cycles helps the power management system know exactly what levels the battery is truly fully discharged and fully charged. If the battery is charged numerous times in partial cycles, the actual battery capacity information could be incorrect, making the system miscalculate remaining battery power, causing a premature shut down or otherwise inaccurate remaining power percentage.

I hope that made sense, at least enough. :)

You may also find this info useful: About iPhone Batteries

Their refurbs are top notch though. I wouldnt think twice about getting a replacement from Apple.
Absolutely agree, unless it has changed in recent years. And... It's not just iPhones that are really nice refurbs. Unless I need the newest of features, I'll be buying all of my Macs refurbed from now on.
 

MrBullet

macrumors member
Original poster
Oct 18, 2011
78
0
Bristol, UK
Hi

What he said:

And... Regarding:

Somewhat debatable with newer Apple portable devices -- I prefer to think it helps -- calibrating your iDevice's power management system could fix your problem, and it won't hurt to try. The process is the same as calibrating the battery in a portable computer. Basically, completely discharge the battery after being fully charged, then fully recharge without stopping the charging process, and than fully discharge again.

As a quick lesson, the process is really about updating the battery information. Performing these full charge cycles helps the power management system know exactly what levels the battery is truly fully discharged and fully charged. If the battery is charged numerous times in partial cycles, the actual battery capacity information could be incorrect, making the system miscalculate remaining battery power, causing a premature shut down or otherwise inaccurate remaining power percentage.

I hope that made sense, at least enough. :)

You may also find this info useful: About iPhone Batteries


Absolutely agree, unless it has changed in recent years. And... It's not just iPhones that are really nice refurbs. Unless I need the newest of features, I'll be buying all of my Macs refurbed from now on.
Thanks for your incredibly informative reply.
 
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