Rap music played role in OU fraternity's racist chant

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Mar 11, 2015.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #1
    http://news.yahoo.com/ou-sae-racist-chant-scandal-fallout-morning-joe-video-140124896.html
    somewhat agree with him. MOST rap is nothing but cRap. very disrespectful towards women.
     
  2. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #2
    Can't argue with it.

    Personal story for me: as eclectic as I am, I pretty much got along with everyone in college. My guitar instructor was a Teke (Tau Kappa Epsilon), friends from high school were SigEps (this frat), and family and friends of the family were in the traditionally Black fraternities (Omega Psi Phi, Alpha Phi Alpha, mother was Alpha Kappa Alpha). So when rush time came along, I was asked to commit by all of these.

    All of these were great frats, as well as my mother's sorority, but in the end, I didn't commit to any of them. I had bigger/better plans.

    On the whole, they aren't bad; or at least they weren't back then (early 90s). But then again, that was a different time with a different music scene. I'm not excusing these guys; they were wrong, and deserve what they get. But they should have known a hell of a lot better, especially for being in the South.

    On the other side of that coin, Scarborough is right in that the rappers don't have any room to talk or right to be upset, especially if these guys were buying their records; if they want to be the example, they need to set the example, and what they are showing themselves to be is horrible.

    BL.
     
  3. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #3
    I can see both sides. I grew up listening to NWA, 2 Live Crew, Too Short and the such. I still know what's right and what's wrong. This probably happens more than we realize, sadly.
     
  4. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #4
    The issue here is that people don't seem to realize how much they record things and put it out on the internet, how quickly it will spread, and how long it will remain on the internet.

    It is now to the point where "chill out, it's just a joke" isn't an excuse, as they will now learn that the actions they take now will last with them until they pass away, and then some. They obviously know enough to do this, to know what is right and what is wrong. this is just a serious lack of judgment, that will now haunt them.

    BL.
     
  5. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    #5
    Rap artists are describing life in a segment of modern urban America. These idiot frat-boys were singing about lynching black men who (theoretically at least) might want to join their fraternity.

    There's a difference. A huge one.

    A case can be made that the rap (and African-America entertainment community in general) ought to stop using the "N" word. But its their discussion, and their issue, to have. Not silly white kids.

    The motto of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the fraternity in question, is "The True Gentleman." I can think of few sentiments less gentlemanly than callously singing about murdering another human being simply because of their skin color.
     
  6. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #6
    Complete BS.

    Rap music has nothing to do with using the N word in a negative term, nor does it have anything to do with singing a song about hanging N's from a tree.
     
  7. xmichaelp macrumors 68000

    xmichaelp

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    #7
    Thank you for having reason.. I though I was going crazy for a second.

    I truly cannot believe how anyone could compare rappers users the n-word as slang and (white) people obviously chanting it in a hateful and racist way. Saying the n-word as a way to say brother or friend is not the same as talking about lynching blacks and how they're now allowed in your club. Sorry folks.

    Hearing the n-word in rap music makes people hateful bigots? Quite the stretch there. Laughable. The frat couches on the bus deserve everything that comes to them and trying to blame anyone but them is ridiculous.
     
  8. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #8
    Are you serious? Plenty of rap talks about shooting others using the N word

    ----------

    Not interested in a vacation for posting lyrics to some of the Crap songs .
     
  9. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #9
    You obviously don't understand the lingo.
     
  10. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #10
    Yeah, that's it :rolleyes:
     
  11. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #11
    Seriously, it actually is. Unless you know better than a 36 year old black guy who was raised in Queens, NY on the very early days of hiphop music to present day. ;)
     
  12. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #12
    I don't recall a single song put out by the Sugar Hill Gang, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Fab Five Freddie, Afrika Bambaataa, or the entire Zulu nation writing songs about calling each other the N word, and wanting to kill each other. In fact, Kevin Donovan changed his name to Afrika Bambaataa from a trip to Africa and seeing the solidarity against apartheid there brought a ton of kids in your hood out of the gangs and brought them peace.

    I even saw that at my very well and old age of 3 - 4 when all of it started, and saw them on TV between 1977 - 1979.

    Rap has nothing to do with what you are trying to make it out to be.

    BL.
     
  13. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #13
    THANK YOU Most of it is cRap
     
  14. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #14
    Not only Rap music, but damn near every genre of music. Your talking about the days before cable TV as we know it. When 99% only had broadcast analog stations. You can say they same about the overly sexual pop music, or the hardcore metal, and etc. Censorship was completely different at those times.

    Rapper's Delight was actually considered an insult to rap music cause of it's disco beat and the lyrics were stolen from a well known local Bronx artist. "The Message" from Grandmaster Flash came out in 1982. One year later Ice Tea releases a track about him being a player and the stereotypical things rappers talk about today. But that didn't hit mainstream, so of course most think rappers weren't speaking about those things. Same with Schoolly D who used the N word plenty and release his first album a year after RUN DMC's album. But again, historically most will only remember RUN DMC, cause it was mostly the clean acts that made the mainstream. My uncle has mixed tapes from 81' - 84' and rapper were using the N word plenty, just like blacks been using the N word before the existence of Hiphop music.

    Nas uses the N word a lot, and I think he's one of the most intelligent and lyrically talented artists who almost always has an enlightening message about life.
     
  15. jkcerda, Mar 11, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015

    jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #15
    Plenty of Crap is about shooting/killing others and portaging women as nothing but "rakes"
     
  16. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #16
    Wow.. umm.. Beat Street and Breakin' introduced the masses to hip hop, as well as acts like Ice T (he was in Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo), Kurtis Blow (also in Breakin') LL Cool J (Beat Street in 1984), on top of Fab 5 Freddie back in 1980 at the earliest, and that was prior to Blondie's Rapture.. and all of this was well before My Addidas.

    Hell, Sir Mixalot's Squaredance Rap was in 1984, and introduced the world to beat box, while Blow was rapping about basketball.

    My point: There was a lot of good, clean, strong rap going on well before then, and given Afrika Bambaataa's influence back then, while you are right that the main goal was to communicate with others how life is on the street, it wasn't as dark and gloomy as you think it was, as it was all about coming together peaceful under something we can all get along with.

    Now, if you want to argue East Coast (peaceful, coming together) versus West Coast (hard core, 2 murders a day), you would have a point; but this is the beginnings of it, in which you're not giving rap and hip hop full credit, especially for saying you're so well versed in its history.

    IIRC, in 1998, Nas walked away from all of that to become a minister.

    EDIT: correction there. It was Mase that left it to become a minister, not Nas.

    BL.
     
  17. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #17
    You got to understand, that's a reality of things people from the hood go through and how they use language. Like most people, I don't know 2PAC personally so I can't speak for his authenticity.

    But you could have easily posted the lyrics for some of 2PAC's very popular tracks like "Keep Your Head Up" or "Wonder why they call you biocth" or "Brenda's got a baby", and the list goes on & on. And that's only from one artist.

    Funny how the lyrics that some perceive as being negative, generalize a whole genre, but ignore the other tracks.

    I will agree that a good 85% of mainstream rap is complete garbage and damn near cooning. The cartoon Boondocks even predicted a lot of what's going on today.

    But who is to blame for that? Since it's the industry execs and the execs of the parent companies that make the decisions of who to put in the spotlight, radio play, marketing, endorsements, and etc.

    Cause the ones that actually have good talent and don't focus on 100% on only the negative expressions don't get the chance they deserve. It's definitely not blacks controlling that. Not even P-diddy or Russell Simmons controls much.

    The problem with mainstream rap, is that those who control the industry are flooding it with only one type of expression instead of letting the world hear the diversity. This is why those like yourself judge rap/hiphop in general as crap.

    So before anyone blame Hiphop/Rap as a whole genre, they need to blame the ones that make the decision to ONLY spotlight the stereotypical/one dimensional type of rap. So it's a bunch of white guys that should in question. These silly mainstream phony rappers today are only pawns.
     
  18. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #18
    Yeah, that's it, it's someome else's fault. :rolleyes:

    Thanks for admitting 85% of it is worthless cRap.
     
  19. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 604

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    #19
    Okay, it's obvious you're just bias against rap and don't want to hear any real discussion about it.

    BTW ..... I stated 85% of MAINSTREAM rap is garbage. Like to know what genre you listen to, so I can judge that based on the mainstream too. ;)
     
  20. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #20
    Never claimed ALL of it was garbage. Just most of it :cool:
    Music wise I am all over the place , from English to Spanish even instrumental .

    For the record , blaming the music for their actions is a cop out , sadly the weak minded will indeed do stupid crap because they heard it or watched it in a. Movie
     
  21. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #21
    I recall how rap concerts spelled trouble. Inevitably, shots would ring out and there'd be all kinds of commotion requiring police intervention, arrests, and a search for perpetrators.
     
  22. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #23
    Drugs, gangs, killing, and mistreating women are very popular subjects in rap, the problem in my mind is that these are all major issues in inner city black communities, but these songs glorify them.

    As for the frat guys I hope they all get kicked out permanently.
     
  23. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #24
    Some rap..... not all rap ;)
     
  24. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #25
    Really we're blaming music for our bad behavior again? C'mon
     

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