Reactions to Obama's election by Conservatives/Republicans

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Beric, Nov 4, 2008.

  1. Beric macrumors 68020

    Beric

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    #1
    Seeing as the "Obama elected" thread seems to be filled by happy and excited liberals/Democrats, I was wondering what the (most likely more serious/sober) reactions of our conservatives and Republicans were, here at MacRumors, one of which I'm a member. I'm not even going to venture into the main thread, out of fear ;). If people on both sides could refrain from making derogatory/inflammatory remarks in this thread, that would be great. Let's just have some honest and peaceful discussion, with critique of others' views that is with good, intelligent thought.


    My own personal thoughts follow:
    1. I'm ready to welcome President Obama. His ascent is no small deal, and while I disagree with him on pretty much every single issue, us on the right aren't racists as others might believe. I'm not angry at him or anything. Our country's political process is remarkable in itself. Congratulations, Mr. Obama.

    2. While I had no doubts about voting for McCain this election, he was definitely not my first choice in the primary. I'm wondering if this election proves that it's always much more intelligent to go for your base FIRST, and then catch the independents, rather than trying to catch your base later, like McCain did. Obama did his strategy right, getting his base FIRST. McCain definitely had a tough job ahead of him to be elected, with Bush's unpopularity and all, but a lot of social conservatives like myself felt extremely neglected by McCain, and even some economic conservatives weren't so sure about him.

    3. Considering the actual implications of Obama's presidency: the Democrats will now control both houses and the presidency. And I'm very curious to see what they'll do with that. One-party rule tends to have problems, just like it has for the Republicans, as anyone can admit. Of course, the Democrats now have no excuse not to get some things done for their cause. The question is whether they'll work, of course. The number one thing I, as a social conservative, am worried about are supreme court appointees. We don't need more activist judges.

    4. Finally, us Republicans need to get back to work and redefine our party. Centrism hasn't worked. What will happen with the Republicans over the next 2-4 years should not be a due to a possible failed Obama presidency, but due to our own work.

    Feels free to discuss my views or your own. But with respect, please. :)
     
  2. robanga macrumors 68000

    robanga

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    #2
    I support whomever is President as long as they obey the law of the land. Both political parties in this country are very "center".

    McCain was never even close to my first choice. I am pretty far to the right of center and he certainly is not.

    Its all good. It all happens again in four years. God Bless America
     
  3. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #3
    You make a really good point. However, I think that the Republican party in order to build its base, over extended itself. Too many splinter groups all vying for a spot in the limelight without a unifying force to hold them in check.

    Obama's campaign was truly bottom up, not top down and it started with young people whose enthusiasm was boundless. They don't have a lot of money but as has been proved, you don't need that many million dollar donors if a few million people donate $10 at a time.

    The NYT had a good analysis a few weeks ago of McCain's campaign and the one thing that stood out was that McCain's message kept changing. Given the current economic crisis, that was disastrous. Obama's message stayed the same throughout his campaign and in times of crisis, people look for those with a steady hand.

    The other aspect that the Republicans will be playing catch up with is technology. Obama's campaign used it to its fullest extent.

    Whatever happens during the next four years, it will be fascinating to see what happens four years from today. I think a lot of assumptions have been torn asunder. That is the beauty of American politics though, it's constantly reinventing itself.
     
  4. Daveman Deluxe macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

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    #4
    Accusations of "activist judges" always concern me. Law in the United States is predicated on the English tradition of common law, which generally gives judges responsibility to create law. Judges are expected to look at past decisions in similar cases, and abide by past decisions unless there is something exceptional about the case before him. Many people fail to understand that judges do not simply decide facts in the case and then look up the correct statutory law. This is generally a good thing, because courts can create necessary changes in law more gradually and more quickly than legislatures can, which often create sweeping changes in law, but only when a situation is positively intolerable.

    A good example of this is to start, in England, with the case of Winterbottom v. Wright. In Winterbottom v. Wright, Winterbottom (plaintiff) was contracted with the postal service to drive a postal cart. The postal service, in turn, contracted Wright (defendant) to maintain the cart in good working condition. When the cart broke down and injured Winterbottom, he sued Wright. But the court decided in favour of defendant, as defendant did not have any contract with plaintiff, and thus, was not negligent in any duty to plaintiff--he had no duties to plaintiff at all! This was called the privity rule.

    But in subsequent decisions, the court began to change that principle. In the United States in 1852, it was decided in Thomas v. Winchester that the principle of privity was overridden when a person's life was endangered (in this case, a poison was mislabeled as an innocuous herb). Later, in MacPherson v. Buick Motor Co., the principle of privity was again narrowed. It was decided that the principle of Thomas v. Winchester extended to anything which can be an implement of destruction in its normal course of use (in this case, an automobile in which the steering failed).

    Three points should be drawn from this example:
    1) The law evolves in the hands of judges.
    2) The law has been evolving in the hands of judges for hundreds of years.
    3) Judges are aware that their decisions have far-reaching impact. This is why decisions are such lengthy affairs, as judges generally want to be careful that their rationales can be used in future cases merely as consideration for judgment, rather than as a "bright line" test.

    In general, I am appalled by the spectacle that is made of whether judges are Republican or Democrat, because it should be immaterial to the rendering of their duties. I am far more interested in the way that they interpret case law.
     
  5. Evangelion macrumors 68040

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    #5
    Are ultra-conservative judges any less "activists" than more liberal judges are?
     
  6. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #6
    Conservapedia are taking it well on their front page;

     
  7. glocke12 macrumors 6502a

    glocke12

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    #7
    For the record I ended up voting straight GOP. Im a conservative and I was leaning towards Obama, but had doubts that would not go away. While I have some concerns regarding Obamas stance on certain issues (Military cuts, and firearms legislation mainly), no matter what happens we will still be living in one of the greatest countries on earth, and I wish Obama the best. He is inheriting alot of problems and needs support
     
  8. aethelbert macrumors 601

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    Chicago, IL, USA
    #8
    After seeing the primaries, McCain was a horrible choice. It baffles me how he won. Anyhoo, it's time that we all come together and reach across the aisle to unite in an effort to hope for change (whatever that means).
     
  9. gkarris macrumors 604

    gkarris

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    #9
    A job for my many friends at church who have been hopelessly out of work for a very, very long time (we are talking years)... :eek:

    I was out of work for almost 3 years when I finally found a job (making less than half of what I was). But, praise God for at least something...
     
  10. glocke12 macrumors 6502a

    glocke12

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2008
    #10
    hmmmm..so Obama has personally promised your friends a job?


    I do wish the guy luck, (and in some ways think he will do a good job) but I think many people who voted for him are going to be dissapointed.
     
  11. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #11
    I supposed that's fair to say regardless of who won. For the record though, being American, I'm going to go ahead and say that I think this is THE greatest country on Earth. I hope everyone can feel that about where they live.
    Obama's promised to work on creating new jobs. Nothing will happen overnight though. We'll certainly have to watch where the wind blows on this. I suspect we'll see him hit the ground running.

    ~ CB
     
  12. és: macrumors 6502a

    és:

    #12
    Well, some people are realistic ;)
     
  13. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #13
    Hardy, ha. All things being relative, if you don't think your own country is the best, I'd certainly love to hear which one IS (especially if its not America). It always strikes me as false-modesty to say "one of" if you don't have something else in mind as a serious contender, if not more than. :)

    ~ CB
     
  14. TraceyS/FL macrumors 68040

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  15. gkarris macrumors 604

    gkarris

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    #15
    Us Middle-Class folk that voted for W. are.... :eek:
     
  16. és: macrumors 6502a

    és:

    #16
    I don't believe that England is the best country in the world. Then again, I don't buy into the whole 'God Bless Amerka' and 'God Save The Queen'. I don't buy into the whole jingoistic euphoria.

    England is one of the best countries, so is America. However, I'd much sooner live in a country (aimed at America) that doesn't have 47m without healthcare. I'd sooner live in a country (aimed at Britain) that doesn't have the highest rate of elderly death from the cold in Europe, including Siberia. I'd sooner no live in a country that is at war over fark all.

    No country is perfect, but ours especially so. Only when you judge against places like the Congo and North Korea do you feel like you live in some kind of utopia.

    "Patriotism is your conviction that this country is superior to all others because you were born in it." - George Bernard Shaw
     
  17. iGary Guest

    iGary

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    Location:
    Randy's House
    #17
    I voted for Obama.

    Total lost faith in the Republican party and what it is supposed to be.

    First democrat I have ever voted for.

    It's what happens when your party runs on a platform of nothingness.
     
  18. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #18
    All he has to do is not be as bad as Bush and no one will be disappointed. That shouldn't be too difficult.

    And thanks for your vote iGary.
     
  19. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #19
    No country is perfect, and America is certainly NO utopia, and neither is its people and history filled only with saints and samaritans. If perfection were a prerequisite for greatness, there would be no such word in the dictionary.

    I'm admittedly disgusted with Americans that think this country is all sunshine and roses, simply because they say so, and are willing to downplay horrible statistics just to nurse their vicarious ego. No... that's not it. I believe in living in the "best country on Earth" (and no equivocating), by sheer belief in its nature and its possibility. You take its history and people as one large canvass upon which to build a better future, and I'll take America in a heartbeat.

    I could always retreat to some country where things are quieter, expectations lower, and responsibility for good and bad things is at an all time low... but in my book, its like comparing someone who takes 20 shots at a basket and misses 3, to someone who makes 4 out of 4 shots. Boy, it sure sucked to miss those 3 shots, but look at the 16 shots the second guy didn't even try to make.

    Yeah, in my opinion... America's the greatest nation on Earth. I hope other people are so fortunate as to truly think the same of where they live (for their own reasons). If failure is a reason to equivocate on effort, I think mediocrity would win everytime.

    ~ CB
     
  20. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #20
    The days of the politics of fear and hatred are over. If the GOP ever wants to win again, they have to change. They have to be positive and actually present some workable ideas. They have failed at that since the first days of Reagan.
     
  21. és: macrumors 6502a

    és:

    #21
    I hope that people are able to look at things subjectively and honestly. No point in just saying you live in the best country or greatest nation. It means nothing.

    Entirely different from striving to be better.
     
  22. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    Chicago, Illinois
    #22
    You hit the nail on the head except for your "centrism" comment. Palin cost you this election, there is no doubt about that. She is an extremist that no one was willing to accept.

    Just remember, It wasn't McCain tha lost. It was Palin.
     
  23. Cleverboy macrumors 65816

    Cleverboy

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    #23
    It is not "honesty" to even say "one of the best". It is simply a feeling no more objective than saying "the best". --Unless you actually have a quantitative list of qualities and analysis that shows some form of generalized objective ranking scale in front of you.
    It means EVERYTHING to anyone striving for better (hence he quote). They are one AND the same. If you're asking "What nation provides the best value in its healthcare", its a measurable quantity. If you ask "What nation has the least amount of crime." Another clear question. "What nation's people are most involved in its Democracy?" Many objective measures there.

    But... Is "The World's Greatest", the "Best Nation of Earth" a truth, or a symbol of potentiality that exists further off in other contenders? An absolute based on easily quantifiable facts, or a statement that embodies all the triumphs and faults, and uses that burning ember of passion, pride, and potential in the observer as its last measure? Do you have the best child on Earth? Do you have the best wife a man could be blessed with? If you're honest, people will have varying answers. For those that answer in the affirmative, its a bit disingenuous to me to pretend there is some way to "disprove" the person's assessment... especially if they can articulate all those subjective and rational qualities that have formed into a thoughtful answer that bears little resemblance to mere zealotry.

    I suspect you think otherwise, but I'll respectfully disagree.

    Um. On-topic... I have to say, Fox News was GLOWING about Obama last night. Some truly nice things were being said, so I'm impressed. I wonder what Fox and Friends will be like this morning, and when will the "honeymoon" be over.

    ~ CB
     
  24. DavidLeblond macrumors 68020

    DavidLeblond

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    #24
    Personally, I think Bush lost it for them. Palin didn't help though.
     
  25. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    Jul 11, 2003
    #25
    I am one of those happy and excited people in that thread but I am neither a liberal or Democrat (nor a Republican/Conservative). My support of Obama was lukewarm when I chose him 2 months ago but literally grew day by day as the campaigns evolved. His victory was made possible by the many Republicans/Conservatives who voted for him.

    While Palin was a huge factor, I think this election boiled down to Bush. He is the reason the Republican party is in shambles. Best of all, I think this election may have been a death blow for Rovian politics.
     

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