Recovery built on low-paying jobs

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Thomas Veil, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #1
    Well, nobody can say the private sector isn't doing its part.

    Actually, everybody can say the private sector isn't doing its part.

    I'm sure this surprises the liberals on this board not a whit. It's just a continuation of the "race to the bottom".

    Conservatives are always anxious to blame the government, to say the government isn't creating enough jobs. But ultimately it's the private sector that has to do it. And it's nice to know that all that merging and "acquisitioning" they've been doing over the years is enabling them to turn middle management folks into weekend sales people at Lowe's.

    Here's the future of your kids, conservatives. Explain how this is going to improve America for anybody but CEOs and corporate shareholders.
     
  2. Thomas Veil thread starter macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #3
    Excellent! :p

    (And, unfortunately, a terrific example of all-too-true gallows humor.)
     
  3. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #4
    And the race to the bottom continues with regard to the American worker. We need a serious revolt against corporations in this country- and soon.
     
  4. itcheroni macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    What will that accomplish?
     
  5. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

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    #6
    Revolt against what? Low prices?

    I hate what is happening to this country as much as anybody, but I don't see the inherent evil in what corporations are doing.

    We have to see the consumer and corporation in a symbiotic relationship. Corporations who continue to operate inefficiently will get driven out of business. Why? Because American consumers are for the most part ruthless and do not do business with their hearts. We mostly shop with our wallets, looking for the best deals. The "best deals" are not coming from companies overrun with middle management, and they rarely are coming from American factories anymore. If you want to support highly-paid workers, it makes sense that you might have to pay more.

    Now, surely there are tax laws that are helping incentivize the export of jobs, and those have got to be fixed. But dont we think this too is going to increase the cost of doing business and get passed down to the consumer?

    Rather than picketing Lowe's or otherwise b*tching and moaning about the sad state of capitalism, the revolution that is really required here starts with our wallets. And it costs money. Who's going to go first?
     
  6. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #7
    I will.
     
  7. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

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    #8
    Right on, man.

    I'm right behind you. Right after I drive my Japanese-made car to Wal-Mart and pick up groceries. ;)
     
  8. Thomas Veil thread starter macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #9
    The problem with much of what you're suggesting is it's pretty much the same ol' same ol'. You can't just continue this "symbiotic relationship" as it is and expect different results.

    What we need is to totally reexamine the idea of capitalism and un-learn all the bad ideas that have been drummed into our heads by quack economists. We were told the customer drives all business decisions. Now we know that's not true. What drives business decisions is making a profit for the stockholders. We were told lower prices are good -- but we were not told they cost jobs. We were told exporting good-paying manufacturing jobs would free us to rise to even better paying management jobs -- and the opposite has come to pass. Most egregiously of all, we were told that if we kept passing wealth up to the upper class, it'd "trickle back down" to us.

    Right now capitalism is an ouroboros:

    [​IMG]

    The guys at the top end are making tons of money by eliminating jobs...but that leaves them with fewer and fewer people to buy their goods. And when people stop buying their goods, companies start doing things like cutting jobs -- which only leaves them with even fewer people buying their goods. It's stupid, it's suicidal, it's the snake eating its own tail -- and unfortunately it's textbook economics in 21st century America.

    In the end what's going to save us is exactly what those Tea Party tools don't want -- regulation. Regulation of capitalism exists on a bell curve. Too much, and innovation and incentive are stifled; too little, and capitalism collapses just like a giant Ponzi scheme -- a situation we're getting uncomfortably closer to.

    Up until now, all the sacrifice has been made at the bottom end, i.e., you and me. Almost all the rewards have gone to the companies. And we all know that's because they don't just have a voice in government, they pretty much own it. And people who are hanging on by their fingernails have little cash to "vote" with. We can't start the revolution with our own wallets until they start creating more jobs and paying us better...and that's not going to happen.

    Lee is right: people have to decide to stand up, louder and in greater numbers than the Tea Party -- and demand that limits be placed on what corporations can do. There is huge room for discussion on what kind of regulation we need. A no-brainer is to break up megacorporations. There's no point, for example, in having only five media companies in the entire US, except to control and narrow the content available, and to increase shareholder profit by eliminating jobs. We can solve both of those problems by splitting them back up into their component parts.

    And, we need to be brave enough to consider the idea of capping prices so that they can't be passed on to consumers. I'm not saying everything, but stuff like the infamous 6000% profit margin on text messages is just friggin' ridiculous.

    Capping prices would not only solve that, but it would allow average Americans to keep more of their money (hey, aren't conservatives supposed to be in favor of that??) at the expense of somewhat lower profits for average shareholders, and significantly lower profits for professional investors, those mega-rich shareholders who might have to settle for purchasing something smaller than the 36-cabin yacht than they'd planned on, and giving their kids Jaguars instead of Bentleys for Christmas this year.

    I'm not suggesting these are all the answers, but I do know that the answers involve getting the money flowing back to the consumers so we can return to that sweet spot in the bell curve where companies and average Americans are making money.
     
  9. SuperCachetes macrumors 6502a

    SuperCachetes

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    #10
    Totally agree.

    This I disagree with... I still say it's a matter of priority. Many of us have more than enough money to buy the organic vegetables, or the free-range chicken, or the hand-made goods. We could take the time to seek out industries that don't support sweatshops. We could seek out companies that use American-sourced parts and labor. I don't think any of this will put most of us in the poor house. But it'd require some change in lifestyle, perhaps - and at worst, some actual sacrifice. We did it 70 years ago for the good of the country. That we can't do it now tells me we don't see our current state as a real threat.

    Totally agree, if by "standing up to the corporations" you mean via government. There is no point in going after the corporations directly, or merely asking them to dissolve their near-monopolies. Rather, it is via government, and as you say - an organized, widespread movement that gets government's attention and suggests that we demand more than just "prices gotta be lowered."
     
  10. thefnshow macrumors regular

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  11. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #12
    The evil isn't in what the corporations are doing. They are doing exactly what they should be doing: creating, marketing, selling. The problem is that our government has gone from being a tool that serves the people to a tool that serves the corporations.
     

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