Reuters: U.N. says 10,000 killed in Yemen war, far more than other estimates (Thanks, Warbama!)

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Jess13, Aug 30, 2016.

  1. Jess13 Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #1
    This would never have been possible without Warbama’s assistance in perpetrating this endless series of war crimes and crimes against humanity against Yemeni men, women, children and babies. At this rate, how is Trump ever going to kill and destroy the lives of more Muslims than Killary and Warbama have? Sheesh!


    U.N. says 10,000 killed in Yemen war, far more than other estimates

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-yemen-security-toll-idUSKCN11516W


    At least 10,000 people have been killed in Yemen's 18-month-old civil war, the United Nations on Tuesday, approaching double the estimates of more than 6,000 cited by officials and aid workers for much of 2016.

    The war pits the Iran-allied Houthi group and supporters of former President Ali Abdullah Saleh against President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, who is supported by an alliance of Arab states led by Saudi Arabia.

    The new toll is based on official information from medical facilities in Yemen, U.N. Humanitarian Coordinator Jamie McGoldrick told a news conference in the capital Sanaa. It might rise as some areas had no medical facilities, and people were often buried without official records.

    The United Nations human rights office said last week that 3,799 civilians have been killed in the conflict, with air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition responsible for some 60 percent of deaths.

    McGoldrick gave no breakdown on civilian casualties, adding the conflict has displaced three million Yemenis and forced 200,000 to seek refuge abroad. The United Nations had information that 900,000 of the displaced intended to try to return to their homes.

    "This is a big challenge, especially in areas still experiencing conflict," McGoldrick said.

    Some 14 million of Yemen's 26 million population needed food aid and 7 million were suffering from food insecurity.
     
  2. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #2
    What should Obama have done differently? Bearing in mind Saudi Arabia and Iran were already involved?
     
  3. Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #3
    Not be a terrorist supporting and arming war criminal?
     
  4. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    Obama is supporting the legitimate government in Yemen. Not terrorists. Possibly they are war criminals, I'm not sure. EDIT: Looks like the Saudis and the opposition have committed war crimes, primarily the Saudis - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yemeni_Civil_War_(2015–present)

    I'm not clear what you want Obama to do.
     
  5. citizenzen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #5
    I just don't get you. I thought I was a pacifist ... but you take it to a whole new level. The Yemen civil war is not the invention of Obama. But once the conflict broke out, what would you have Obama do? Nothing?

    from the NYTimes ...
    One one hand we have people claiming that Obama allowed terrorism to flourish in the Mid East, while on the other hand there is you calling Obama a war criminal for trying to defeat terrorism.

    Somewhere in the middle is the truth. I just wish you folks would come in from the fringe to embrace a more complex reality than the CT nonsense you like to indulge in.
     
  6. Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #6
    I could post stories all day, but you have the Internet. Obama is actively participating in committing endless war crimes and crimes against humanity, coalition forces Obama is arming and supporting are fighting allied with al-Qaeda, on al-Qaeda’s team. War criminal Obama and his Saudi war criminal friends are strengthening al-Qaeda. The Houthis Obama is helping bomb, are fighting al-Qaeda.

    Trump isn’t Hitler; Warbama is Hitler.



    Obama Disastrously Backed the Saudis in Yemen, Now He's Deploying US Troops to Deal with the Fallout

    The U.S. says it is fighting the same Al Qaeda affiliates that are allied with elements of the coalition America is backing.

    http://www.alternet.org/grayzone-project/incoherent-empire-what-obama-doing-sending-troops-yemen

    The Obama administration has said little about its fresh deployment of American troops to Yemen, where the U.S. has spent the past year backing the ruthless Saudi Arabia-led military intervention by shipping weapons, identifying bomb targets and sending its warships to assist the naval blockade.

    So the U.S. admits that it is ramping up a war that has strengthened the forces it claims to be fighting. However, reality is even more nefarious. A recently-released PBS Frontline documentary by journalist Safa Al Ahmad reveals that combatants from the Saudi-led coalition are fighting alongside militants affiliated with Al Qaeda in the Yemeni city of Taiz.

    The BBC acknowledged that Al Ahmad’s film provides evidence “that troops from a Saudi-led coalition force and Al Qaeda militants are both fighting Houthi rebels in a key battle. On a visit to the frontline near the city of Taiz, a documentary maker filmed jihadists as well as UAE-supported pro-government militiamen.”

    This is not the first report of its kind. Last July, Maria Abi-Habib and Mohammed Al-Kibsi wrote in the Wall Street Journal that “local residents and a senior Western diplomat” all testify that Saudi-backed militias have “turned to Yemen-based al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP, for help.”

    The current Yemen war, meanwhile, is not the first time that the U.S. has directly or indirectly cooperated with Al Qaeda affiliates around the world.

    So AQAP is not only growing in strength because it is “taking advantage” of the chaos, as Trudeau characterized it. Rather, some of its forces are fighting alongside elements of the coalition. Whatever the extent of this collaboration, the fact that Al Qaeda affiliates are growing in strength as a result of the coalition’s war is indisputable. What evidence suggests that an escalation of this failed war will somehow yield a different result?

    Yet, in the name of fighting Al Qaeda, the United States increasing its participation in a coalition that has unleashed extraordinary bloodshed on ordinary people throughout the country. The coalition has targeted densely populated urban centers, factories, weddings and a center for the blind. American-made cluster bombs have rained down on civilian villages. More than 3,000 civilians have been killed and, in February alone, two-thirds of the innocent people slain died by coalition air strikes, according to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. Relentless bombings and a naval blockade have pushed the entire country to the brink of famine, with the UN estimating that half of Yemen’s population—14.4 million people—“urgently need food security and livelihood assistance.”


    Obama’s Gotten The U.S. Stuck In Yemen. Is He Looking For A Way Out?

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obama-yemen-war_us_562a9ac0e4b0443bb5640b85

    WASHINGTON — Over the past six months, the Obama administration has quietly embroiled the U.S. in a Middle Eastern war that has left more than 20 million people in need of humanitarian aid and killed at least 5,000.

    U.S.-backed Sunni Arab nations, led by Saudi Arabia, have bombed weddings, left families to starve and looked the other way as an al Qaeda affiliate has used the confusion to seize significant territory. Civilian casualties are growing daily.

    The White House won’t admit that the U.S. is even “in” Yemen. But it’s refueling the planes bombing the country and providing intelligence to the Sunni states running the Yemen campaign. Now lawmakers, dissenters within the administration and human rights activists are ramping up their criticisms of the Obama policy. They argue that the U.S. is callously backing the Saudi-led coalition — in part to reassure America’s Sunni allies in the wake of the nuclear deal with Shiite Iran — without concern for the consequences. By supporting the Saudi effort, they say, President Barack Obama risks empowering al Qaeda and implicating the U.S. and its allies in war crimes — not to mention further tarnishing America’s already damaged image in the Middle East.

    “It’s time for Congress to ask some serious questions about whether the United States’ current participation in this civil war is advancing our nation’s national security interests,” Sen. Christopher Murphy (D-Conn.) said in a statement Thursday.


    This Congressman Doesn’t Buy Obama’s Excuses For Supporting Saudi Arabia In Yemen

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry...audi-arabia-yemen_us_571e8a26e4b01a5ebde305a5

    WASHINGTON — One of the architects of unprecedented new legislation that would restrict U.S. arms sales to Saudi Arabia believes the Obama administration has repeatedly deflected questions about its ongoing support for Saudi actions in Yemen.

    Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.) said his frustration with the U.S. policy is one reason why he joined three other lawmakers to propose barring the sale of more American bombs and missiles to Saudi Arabia until the administration provides new guarantees on Saudi behavior.

    That precondition means that the measure, introduced earlier this month, is an indictment of President Barack Obama’s approach to the kingdom as much as it is one of Saudi wrongdoing.

    In March 2015, Obama quietly approved a U.S. role in a Saudi-led military effort to restore Yemen’s internationally recognized government, which had lost its capital and much of the country to Iran-backed rebels. U.S. intelligence began to flow to the campaign and U.S. planes began refueling its jets, as Saudis and other Gulf Arabs deployed U.S. weaponry sold to them with the president’s permission.

    The White House has offered a limited public defense for its role in the bloody Yemen conflict. It speaks mainly of supporting a friend against instability in its neighborhood, with an official telling Al-Hayat newspaper that the U.S. was nervous that the Yemeni rebels were preparing to attack Saudi Arabia. The administration also says it regrets the civilian deaths.

    But officials do say that U.S. support, particularly intelligence sharing, is intended to reduce the chance that the relatively inexperienced Saudi military will miss targets and kill civilians.

    Lieu slammed that reasoning in his HuffPost interview.

    “The notion that if we’re assisting this Saudi-led coalition, that they’re going to commit 27 war crimes instead of 34 war crimes to me is not a persuasive argument,” the congressman said. “We should not be assisting a coalition that’s committing any war crimes.”


    Why Is the United States Abetting Saudi War Crimes in Yemen?

    The Obama administration’s record-setting arms deals with Riyadh have strengthened extremists and led to greater regional instability.

    https://www.thenation.com/article/why-is-the-united-states-abetting-saudi-war-crimes-in-yemen/

    Arabia, mainly to replace tanks that the kingdom has lost in its war in Yemen against Houthi rebels and allies of the former president. The $1.15 billion deal highlights the Obama administration’s deepening involvement in the Saudi-led war, which has escalated after four months of peace talks broke down on August 6. Since then, warplanes from the Saudi-led coalition have bombed a Yemeni school, a hospital run by Doctors Without Borders, and a potato-chip factory, killing more than 40 civilians, including at least 10 children.

    The deal for the Saudi army to buy 153 Abrams tanks, hundreds of machine guns, 20 heavy-tank recovery vehicles, ammunition, and assorted other weapons is the latest in a series of arms sales by the United States—and, to a lesser extent, Britain and France—to the kingdom since it launched its war against Yemen in March 2015. In addition to providing intelligence assistance, Washington has rushed billions in smart bombs and other war matériel to help the Saudi air force continue its bombing campaign. Indeed, some of the Saudi weapons systems are so complex and dependent on US spare parts that they would be grounded without American assistance.

    Despite its supposed turn away from Gulf allies—and a pivot toward Iran, underscored by the considerable political capital expended to reach last year’s nuclear deal—the Obama administration has dramatically ramped up arms sales to Saudi Arabia and other Arab allies in the Gulf. Since 2010, the administration has authorized a record $110 billion in military sales to Saudi Arabia, according to the Congressional Research Service. The planned sales include dozens of advanced F-15 fighter jets, Apache attack helicopters, naval vessels, Patriot missile-defense systems, hundreds of armored vehicles, and thousands of missiles, bombs, and other munitions. (Some of these weapons, such as the large number of F-15 jets, could take years to be manufactured and delivered, so the final value of the contracts could be different than those authorized by the administration.) Over the past six years, Obama and his aides have concluded deals for nearly $48 billion in weapons sales, according to a Reuters investigation of Saudi military spending—triple the $16 billion in sales under the George W. Bush administration.


    Quiet Support for Saudis Entangles U.S. in Yemen

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/14/world/middleeast/yemen-saudi-us.html

    Mr. Obama soon gave his approval for the Pentagon to support the impending military campaign.

    A year later, the war has been a humanitarian disaster for Yemen and a study in the perils of the Obama administration’s push to get Middle Eastern countries to take on bigger military roles in their neighborhood. Thousands of Yemeni civilians have been killed, many by Saudi jets flying too high to accurately deliver the bombs to their targets. Peace talks have been stalled for months. American spy agencies have concluded that Yemen’s branch of Al Qaeda has only grown more powerful in the chaos.

    The Obama administration has in the meantime been whipsawed by criticism from all sides. Although the United States has provided the Saudi-led coalition with intelligence, airborne fuel tankers and thousands of advanced munitions, Arab allies have at times complained that the support is halfhearted and freighted with too many restrictions.

    Critics of the American involvement argue that the White House should not be giving any military assistance at all to what they call a reckless, incoherent war.

    “As I read the conflict in Yemen, I have a hard time figuring out what the U.S. national security interests are,” Senator Christopher S. Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee, said during a congressional hearing this year.

    He added that “the result of the coalition campaign has been to kill a lot of civilians, has been to sow the seeds of humanitarian crisis, and to create space for these groups — these very extremist groups that we claim to be our priority in the region — to grow.”


    The US is promoting war crimes in Yemen

    https://www.theguardian.com/comment...romoting-war-crimes-yemen-saudi-bombing-obama

    Saudi Arabia resumed its appalling war in Yemen last week and has already killed dozens more civilians, destroyed a school full of children and leveled a hospital full of sick and injured people. The campaign of indiscriminate killing – though let’s call it what it is: a war crime – has now been going on for almost a year and a half. And the United States bears a large part of the responsibility.

    This US-backed war is not just a case of the Obama administration sitting idly by while its close ally goes on a destructive spree of historic proportions. The government is actively selling the Saudis billions of dollars of weaponry. They’re re-supplying planes engaged in the bombing runs and providing “intelligence” for the targets that Saudi Arabia is hitting.

    Put simply, the US is quite literally funding a humanitarian catastrophe that, by some measures, is larger than the crisis in Syria. As the New York Times editorial board wrote this week: “Experts say the coalition would be grounded if Washington withheld its support.” Yet all we’ve heard is crickets.

    High-ranking Obama administration officials are hardly ever asked about the crisis. Cable television news has almost universally ignored it. Both the Clinton and Trump presidential campaigns have been totally silent on this issue despite their constant arguing over who would be better at “stopping terrorism”. Beyond the grotesque killing of civilians, it’s clear at this point that the Saudis’ bombing campaign has also boosted al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (Aqap) to a level which Reuters described as “stronger and richer” than anytime in its 20-year history.

    The fact that the Obama administration has allowed the Saudis to continue committing war crimes should be a full-fledged scandal. Officials should be resigning over this and shouting from the rooftops. Instead, for months, we’ve heard almost nothing from the administration beyond a couple boilerplate, lukewarm expressions of “concern” as the death toll has mounted over a year and a half. Finally, after prodding from reporters last week, the US state department condemned the bombing of a Doctors Without Borders (AKA Médecins sans Frontières) hospital that killed at least 15 people. But then, the state department spokesman refused to say whether the US would stop supplying the Saudis with the weapons they are using.

    At the same time, the US military can’t even articulate why our government is helping at all. As Micah Zenko pointed out last year, Gen Lloyd Austin, commander of US Central Command, admitted in March 2015: “I don’t currently know the specific goals and objectives of the Saudi campaign, and I would have to know that to be able to assess the likelihood of success.” Yet that hasn’t stopped the military from helping the Saudis kill thousands of civilians since.


    Obama’s war crimes in Yemen

    https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/09/15/yeme-s15.html

    Earlier this month, Obama, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate, welcomed with open arms Saudi beheader-in-chief, King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, to the White House, where they held friendly discussions about a number of issues important to US interests in the Middle East, including the ongoing assault in Yemen.

    The coalition of US puppets led by Saudi Arabia have deployed their American-supplied jet fighters, dropping American bombs guided by American intelligence, in an effort to reinstate the government of President Abdrabuh Monsour Hadi.

    The beleaguered president established a government in exile in Riyadh after being forced to flee by Houthi militias, which took over much of the country’s western provinces this spring with the backing of former longtime head of state Ali Abdullah Saleh.

    The Obama administration has not only provided Saudi Arabia and its coalition partners with bombs, military intelligence and other logistical support in its air campaign. American refueling planes have been flying daily missions to ensure that coalition warplanes can keep pounding targets throughout the country around the clock. American advisers are vetting targets and working alongside Saudi officers in an operations center in Riyadh, which is overseeing military operations in Yemen.

    To coincide with the Saudi monarch’s visit to the US, it was announced that the Pentagon had reached a deal to sell Saudi Arabia one billion dollars’ worth of bombs, refilling the stockpiles which have been drawn down by unrelenting airstrikes against the Yemeni population. The Obama administration previously struck a 20-year, $60 billion weapons deal with Saudi Arabia in 2010, the largest in US history, agreeing to sell them, among other things, modern fighter jets and attack helicopters.

    Now in its sixth month, the war has plunged the country into the depths of a humanitarian disaster. Human rights organizations estimate that 21 million people, approximately 80 percent of the country’s population, are in need of some form of humanitarian aid.

    Shortages of food, medical supplies and clean drinking water have placed the lives of millions at risk. Dire warnings from humanitarian aid organizations that the country is on the verge of famine, with half a million children at risk of severe malnutrition, have done nothing to ease the assault.

    Saudi warplanes have carried out a continuous barrage of airstrikes against civilian and military targets alike. Residential neighborhoods, workers barracks, factories, market places, schools, hospitals and commercial ports have all been targeted for destruction. Thousand-year-old mosques and other historic archeological sites have been destroyed by coalition bombs.

    The only areas which have escaped coalition airstrikes are those parts of the country controlled by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), which has proven itself an effective ally of the US in the effort to defeat the Houthis. US drone strikes continue to target individual AQAP leaders, but their fighters have been free to move throughout the country unmolested.

    A few examples give a sense of the scale and scope of the criminal devastation being wrought by the Saudi coalition under the direct sponsorship of Obama administration:

    On August 30, at least 36 workers were killed when Saudi jet fighters dropped bombs on a water bottling factory in the Abs District of Haajah province. Access to clean drinking water was severely limited prior to the onslaught, which has severely exacerbated the problem and put millions at risk of contracting water-borne diseases. Fuel shortages have also contributed to water shortages in the country.

    On August 18, coalition jet fighters dropped bombs on the port of Hodeidad, destroying four cranes used to offload ships and also demolishing nearby warehouses. The port had been the main site for getting humanitarian aid into areas of the country controlled by Houthi forces. A blockade of Yemen enforced by Saudi Arabia and Egypt with the aid of US Navy warships has contributed to a shortage of food, fuel and desperately needed medical supplies. Aid shipments had already been severely limited prior to the bombing of the port.

    On July 24, coalition bombs ripped through dormitories housing power plant workers and their families in the southwestern city of Mokah. 63 people were killed and another 50 were injured in the attack. A reporting team from Amnesty International visited the attack site and found no indications that the housing units had ever been used for military purposes by the Houthis or their allies.

    On July 6, a devastating airstrike on a busy livestock market in the town of Fayush, north of Aden, killed 45 people and wounded another 50. Livestock and food markets throughout the country have repeatedly been targeted for airstrikes.

    Any one these devastating attacks, if they had been carried out by Russia, China or Iran, would have provoked non-stop headlines and media outrage. Politicians would have gone on televisions to weep crocodile tears over the civilian casualties and demand that something be done to bring those governments to account.

    Obama, the onetime candidate of hope and change, has not only continued but expanded the imperialist interventions initiated by the Bush administration. In the last seven years, Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Somalia have all been subject to one or another form of American military intervention, inflicting death and destruction, while forcing millions of refugees to flee for their lives into Europe and elsewhere.

    The brutal assault on Yemen exposes the grotesque hypocrisy of those who cry out for supposedly “humanitarian” interventions against governments which are not fully under the thumb of American imperialism. Over the last fourteen years, the so-called war on terror, “human rights” and the promotion of democracy have all been exposed as mere pretexts for establishing the hegemony of the US over the Middle East and its vast energy reserves.


    Human Rights Advocates: U.S.-Backed Saudi Offensive in Yemen a "Dark Mark" on Obama's Presidency

    http://www.democracynow.org/2016/4/1/human_rights_advocates_us_backed_saudi

    AMY GOODMAN: Since the U.S.-backed, Saudi-led intervention began last March, more than 6,000 people have been killed in Yemen, about half of them civilians. According to UNICEF, nearly 10 million children are in dire need of humanitarian assistance, and 320,000 are at risk of severe acute malnutrition. Meanwhile, the U.S. launched air attacks on al-Qaeda in southern Yemen, killing 14 people described by local sources as suspected militants.

    For more, we’re joined by two guests. In Beirut, Lebanon, we’re joined by Farea Al-Muslimi, a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut. He’s also the co-founder and chair of the Sana’a Center for Strategic Studies. In 2013, he testified before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee hearing on the U.S. secret drone program. And we’re also joined by Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director of Human Rights Watch’s Middle East and North Africa Division. Her recent piece in the Los Angeles Times is headlined "The U.S. is quietly helping Saudi Arabia wage a devastating aerial campaign in Yemen."

    SARAH LEAH WHITSON: What the U.S. is doing goes well beyond providing military assistance, as in the weapons that are actually being used in this war. What’s less known and less understood, and what the U.S. government has been very deliberately vague about, is that the U.S. is actually sitting in the Riyadh Command Center providing targeting assistance—this is what they’ve told us—as well as providing refueling for aircraft. Now, the targeting assistance, it is what’s most problematic, because we don’t know whether they’re providing targeting assistance on a strike-by-strike basis, whether they’re just reviewing the strike lists, whether they’re actually telling the Saudis what they should strike. And that is what we are asking the United States to come clean about. We want to know exactly which strikes the U.S. government has provided assistance for.

    JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And you’ve also documented the use of—by the Saudis, of cluster bombs in their attacks. Could you talk about that, as well?

    SARAH LEAH WHITSON: Yes. So, the U.S. and the United Kingdom have both sold cluster munitions to Saudi Arabia. And now we have documented finding in strikes the duds of American-made cluster munitions. Recently, some British-made cluster munitions were also found. These cluster bombs were used in civilian areas and civilian sites, including, for example, Sana’a University, where there were remnants of cluster munitions.
     
  7. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    Location:
    República Cascadia
    #7
    Well done, Obama. Well done.

    You've certainly earned that Nobel Peace Prize.
     
  8. thats all folks macrumors 6502a

    thats all folks

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2013
    Location:
    Austin (supposedly in Texas)
    #8
    So which is it? is he a hardline warmonger or a socialist p*ssy? Isn't Obama just continuing the same policies that have been in place for so many decades? also, Saudi Arabia was given a giant stack of get-out-of-jail-free cards during the post WWI restructuring of the Middle East. all they have to do is keep the oil flowing.
     
  9. Jess13, Aug 30, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016

    Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #9
    Obama isn’t a socialist, he’s a corporatist. Yes, Obama is a warmonger extraordinaire. Obama’s regime has bombed more countries than Bush’s regime. Obama has conspired with 9/11 Saudis named in the 28 pages (i.e. Bandar) to arm terrorists in Syria. This, after Obama and Hillary armed terrorists in Libya. Yes to what you said about Obama continuing the ‘bomb somebody, somewhere, always’ foreign policy of previous presidents, that just never seems to end. But Obama was supposed to be different, remember? Speaking of socialists, in the above set of news stories I included one from the World Socialist Web Site:


    Obama’s war crimes in Yemen

    https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/09/15/yeme-s15.html

    Earlier this month, Obama, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate, welcomed with open arms Saudi beheader-in-chief, King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, to the White House, where they held friendly discussions about a number of issues important to US interests in the Middle East, including the ongoing assault in Yemen.

    The coalition of US puppets led by Saudi Arabia have deployed their American-supplied jet fighters, dropping American bombs guided by American intelligence, in an effort to reinstate the government of President Abdrabuh Monsour Hadi.

    The beleaguered president established a government in exile in Riyadh after being forced to flee by Houthi militias, which took over much of the country’s western provinces this spring with the backing of former longtime head of state Ali Abdullah Saleh.

    The Obama administration has not only provided Saudi Arabia and its coalition partners with bombs, military intelligence and other logistical support in its air campaign. American refueling planes have been flying daily missions to ensure that coalition warplanes can keep pounding targets throughout the country around the clock. American advisers are vetting targets and working alongside Saudi officers in an operations center in Riyadh, which is overseeing military operations in Yemen.

    To coincide with the Saudi monarch’s visit to the US, it was announced that the Pentagon had reached a deal to sell Saudi Arabia one billion dollars’ worth of bombs, refilling the stockpiles which have been drawn down by unrelenting airstrikes against the Yemeni population. The Obama administration previously struck a 20-year, $60 billion weapons deal with Saudi Arabia in 2010, the largest in US history, agreeing to sell them, among other things, modern fighter jets and attack helicopters.

    Now in its sixth month, the war has plunged the country into the depths of a humanitarian disaster. Human rights organizations estimate that 21 million people, approximately 80 percent of the country’s population, are in need of some form of humanitarian aid.

    Shortages of food, medical supplies and clean drinking water have placed the lives of millions at risk. Dire warnings from humanitarian aid organizations that the country is on the verge of famine, with half a million children at risk of severe malnutrition, have done nothing to ease the assault.

    [continue]​
     
  10. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2006
  11. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Location:
    the faraway towns
    #11
    You've got some good sources, but you've made a few mistakes for rhetorical punch. First, the phrase "Actively participating" means that literally Obama is flying an F-18 or on the ground.

    Second, it's important to note that while the Obama administration is certainly supporting the Saudis, that does not mean that Obama himself is a war criminal. That would require him to have ordered or actively committed such a crime. Supporting the Saudis with weaponry and intelligence is certainly problematic, but gets very sticky when talking about war crimes.

    Obama's Nobel Prize should be a short-hand for a certain kind of dramatic irony.
     
  12. Jess13, Aug 30, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016

    Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #12
    Obama is the Commander in chief, he doesn’t have to be flying the jets or be in the Riyadh war room for it qualify as active participation. If it wasn’t for Obama’s particpation, action, assistance, support, and all that it entails, there would be no war against Yemen. It is spelled out fairly clearly in those above stories. And Obama is every bit as guilty as the Saudi leadership is for war crimes and crimes against humanity. Every bit. Plus, Obama is a war criminal many times over for a ton of his other non-Yemen war crimes.
     
  13. citizenzen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    #13
    The Middle East is a strategic region. Would you expect a president to take his hands off the wheel and not try to exert some degree of influence over the outcome of a civil war?

    You already have a good portion of the nation believing he created ISIS by withdrawing from Iraq. And on the otherhand you have jess and jkcerda crying war criminal because he sold arms to Saudi Arabia ... in an effort to help keep Al Qaeda and ISIS in check.

    All I know is that the U.S. has a long history of exerting its influence around the globe by selling arms and backing factions we believe will forward our interests. Obama didn't invent the practice, and every president who follows him will do the same.

    So posts like the OP's are just eye-rollers to me. It's as if he doesn't live in the real world where the U.S. does what it needs to protect its interests.
     
  14. Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #14
    Minimization attempt through mischaracterization alert!
    Minimization attempt through mischaracterization alert!

    siren.png
     
  15. vrDrew macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Location:
    Midlife, Midwest
    #15
    You know how I was talking about "divisiveness"?

    Yeah. It's garbage like this.

    What, in all good faith, is the point of this thread? Or the one about a three-year old incident of animal cruelty? Or any one of a dozen that the usual suspects throw out on pretty much a daily basis?

    Does the OP really want to have an in-depth discussion of multi-decade Yemeni civil war? Which - in case you were wondering, wasn't started by Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama over arugula salad and a nice pinot grigio.

    Because the truth is, I suspect the OP doesn't really give a nickel jizz about Yemeni civilians. Because, heaven forbid they show up in his town.
     
  16. Jess13, Aug 30, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2016

    Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #16
    Yep, publishing in PRSI a Reuters story via the UN from today is “garbage.” Only because those 10,000+ estimated dead are now deceased in significant part because of the actual garbage: Obama/Saudis

    There is an endless series of war crimes and crimes against humanity being perpetrated against mostly civilians, it’s a huge humanitarian crisis. I am antiwar: I was with Bush as POTUS, and still am with Bush 2.0bama as POTUS. Funny how Warbama feigns concern for Syrian civilians being killed by the Syrian army, and that is “why” he has to arm terrorists with CIA and 9/11 Saudis to destroy Syria and work to overthrow Assad, yet Obama is helping the Saudi army obliterate thousands of civilians in [fairly nearby] Yemen.

    Yeah, Obama and Hillary wouldn’t do the Pinot Grigio they’d have a White House Beer Summit.

    Suspect; falsely assume. What’s the difference?
     
  17. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Location:
    the faraway towns
    #17
    Again, "active participation" has a specific meaning that you're missing for a rhetorical punch. You want led, the president led the United States government to ship arms, and provide assistance to the government of Saudi Arabia to fight the war in Yemen. That's a fully accurate statement.

    However, you accuse the president of warcrimes, but this requires a specific action, order or intent. These articles simply won't show that.

    The president has often relegated U.S. influence to quiet wars that are fought with minimal U.S. involvement, but still have serious, brutal casualties. Now, we can argue that the president had to follow this policy, but he can't be a peacemaker if he leads the nation into the midst of multiple small-wars.

    So, again it's a kind of irony that the guy with the Nobel Peace Prize is also at the helm of multiple conflicts—Yemen, Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, etc.

    Now, it's also important to note that all of these conflicts are the result of the Bush administration's disastrous and completely incompetent invasion of Iraq.
     
  18. Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #18
    War criminal Obama regime and his war criminal Saudi regime friends just bombed another market full of women and children.




    You’re wrong.
     
  19. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #19
    "Already involved" meaning they use the billions we've been sending them, for them to buy our weapons, to use them to bomb the **** out of Yemen committing war crimes.

    Anyone wanna take bets on how long until we "respond" to a terrorist attack by Yemenis with our own involvement (took late, special forces are all over the place there)? I can't imagine seeing our flag on all the shrapnel of the bombs being dropped is making us any friends there.

    Frankly, we need to cut ties with Saudi Arabia, they are the core spreaders of the wahabbi theology that is driving extremist attacks around the world. This is well known, and it's been this way since the 40's. We actually funded and set up the madrassa's initially, because islamic extremism was a useful weapon against the nationalism creeping up in the ME because we wanted that sweet sweet oil. Who would have thunk that it would turn on us just decades later? Everyone? Well anyone with a functional brainstem of course.
     
  20. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    Location:
    República Cascadia
    #20
    How is Yemen, Afghanistan, and Somalia even tangentially related to Bush and Hillary's 2003 invasion of Iraq? Even the Syrian Civil War erupted out of the Arab Spring and had nothing to do with the invasion of Iraq.
     
  21. Jess13, Aug 31, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2016

    Jess13 thread starter Suspended

    Jess13

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2013
    #21
    **** PRESIDENT OBAMA! **** THE SAUDIS! ENDLESS WAR CRIMES AND CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY. OBAMA SHOULD HAVE HIS NOBEL PEACE PRIZE FORCIBLY RESCINDED. ****ING WAR CRIMINAL.


    A Congressman Campaigns to “Stop the Madness” of U.S. Support for Saudi Bombing in Yemen

    https://theintercept.com/2016/08/22...ss-of-u-s-support-for-saudi-bombing-in-yemen/

    FOR MONTHS, A CALIFORNIA congressman has been trying to get Obama administration officials to reconsider U.S. backing for the Saudi-led war in Yemen. And for months, he has been given the runaround.

    Ted Lieu, a Democrat representing Los Angeles County, served in the Air Force and is a colonel in the Air Force Reserves. The brutal bombing of civilian areas with U.S.-supplied planes and weapons has led him to act when most of his colleagues have stayed silent.

    “I taught the law of war when I was on active duty,” he told The Intercept. “You can’t kill children, newlyweds, doctors and patients — those are exempt targets under the law of war, and the coalition has been repeatedly striking civilians,” he said. “So it is very disturbing to me. It is even worse that the U.S. is aiding this coalition.”

    The matter has gotten ever more urgent since August 7, when the Saudi-led coalition relaunched an aggressive campaign of attacks after Houthi rebels in Yemen rejected a one-sided peace deal.

    More than 60 Yemeni civilians have been killed in at least five attacks on civilian areas since the new bombing campaign began. On August 13, the coalition bombed a school in Haydan, Yemen, killing at least 10 children and injuring 28 more.

    Lieu released a statement two days later, harshly condemning the attack. “The indiscriminate civilian killings by Saudi Arabia look like war crimes to me. In this case, children as young as 8 were killed by Saudi Arabian air strikes,” he wrote.

    “By assisting Saudi Arabia, the United States is aiding and abetting what appears to be war crimes in Yemen,” Lieu added. “The administration must stop enabling this madness now.”

    Then, mere minutes after his office sent out the statement about the August 13 attack, another tragedy started making headlines: The coalition had just bombed a hospital operated by the international medical humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders (also known as Médecins Sans Frontières, or MSF), killing 19.

    That was the fourth MSF medical facility that the Saudi-led coalition — which has received weapons, intelligence and support from the U.S. and U.K. — has bombed in the past year in Yemen.

    By a conservative estimate, more than 6,500 Yemenis have been killed since the war began in March 2015. The violence has pushed Yemen – which was already the poorest country in the Middle East, suffering from widespread hunger and destitution — into what the U.N. has called for well over a year now a “humanitarian catastrophe.”

    Lieu has been repeatedly raising concerns about Yemen since last fall.

    In October, Lieu and a dozen other members of Congress sent a letter to President Obama, raising concerns about war crimes committed by the coalition. The Saudi-led coalition had just bombed two weddings, killing more than 150 Yemenis.

    In March, Lieu sent a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry and Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, calling for the government to “provide an assessment as to whether the indiscriminate nature of the coalition’s operations and the targeting of civilians have significantly changed since October 2015.”

    “No progress has been made, tragically,” Lieu said. “A year after we first began seeing reports of widespread Saudi-led coalition bombings on civilians, the coalition is still bombing schools and hospitals.”

    A report released by a U.N. panel of experts in February offered a more detailed glimpse into the sheer horror. It documented “that the coalition had conducted air strikes targeting civilians and civilian objects, in violation of international humanitarian law, including camps for internally displaced persons and refugees; civilian gatherings, including weddings; civilian vehicles, including buses; civilian residential areas; medical facilities; schools; mosques; markets, factories and food storage warehouses; and other essential civilian infrastructure, such as the airport in Sana’a, the port in Hudaydah and domestic transit routes.”
     
  22. colourfastt macrumors 6502a

    colourfastt

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    #22
    That would have been Reagan.
     
  23. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #23
    That would have been every US president since WWII, respectfully.

    This is how empire operates.
     
  24. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    #24
    Bush was called out on his lies. I should probably look at the links above, did Obama get caught in a lie about no WMDs/not liberating the Iraqis/etc?
     
  25. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #25
    No, but he's bombed 7 countries that had nothing to do with 9/11 under the guise that the 2001 authorization allows him to...which is complete ****ing nonsense, and congress simply doesn't do it's job anymore when it comes to war authorization.

    The office of the imperial presidency has been solidified under Obama, when he should have sent Cheney, Bush, Wolfowitz, Rice and many others to the ICC. I'll never forgive him for legitimizing our illegal war practices, which will continue with the next president.
     

Share This Page