Security updates for SL

Discussion in 'macOS' started by gangof4, Feb 26, 2014.

  1. gangof4 macrumors member

    gangof4

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Location:
    Texas
    #1
    I'm one of the diehard still using 10.6.8. I suppose the recent vulnerability does not apply to me, but how long can I expect to receive updates for Snow Leopard? Or, have they stopped already?
     
  2. aau macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2014
    #2
    I think they have stopped. The latest security updates did not include SL even though it patched things that SL included, like php.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #3
    They've already stopped. 10.6.8 is the last update of SL which was released in 2011
     
  4. gangof4 thread starter macrumors member

    gangof4

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Location:
    Texas
    #4
    Sl

    Right, but I meant in terms of vulnerability. If Apple discovered a fundamental security weakness affecting Snow Leopard, Lion, Mountain Lion, and Mavericks, would they send a patch for SL users or just say "Tha heck with them. They should have updated a long time ago?" In that case, is SL nothing more than a "ticking bomb" just lying exposed to a new generation of hackers with no hope of help from Apple?
     
  5. aau macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2014
    #5
    The last security update for SL was 2013-004 delivered on Sept. 12 last year. That brought php to 5.3.26 and apache to 2.2.24 on SL (among other things). The latest security update 2014-001 for 10.7+ patches php to 5.3.28 (5.4.22 on 10.9) and apache to 2.2.26, among other things. So I conclude Apple has decided to no longer deliver security updates to SL, and everyone still running it is on their own. Open-source components like apache or php can still be updated manually, but other stuff would be much harder.
     
  6. PacMan3000 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2011
    #6
    I am in the same boat as the OP and could also use some advice--I'm a bit unclear.

    First, I have 10.6.8. Now, maybe it's all hype, but the security issues have me a little concerned--even if people say my version of OSX is likely not affected.

    So my questions are this:

    1) As the OP said, if 10.6.8 will no longer receive security updates, does it make sense now to make the jump to Mountain Lion?

    2) If so, I'm also curious...do I download Lion 10.7? Or 10.8? Or do I first need to download 10.7, and then go to the Software Update in the menu section to then automatically download whatever latest OSX version for Lion is available (10.8, 10.9--I don't know what it's on now)?

    3) Lastly, if and when I pay for and purchase Lion, will the actual download of Lion itself INCLUDE this latest security patch update that was released on Wednesday (this SSL security update)? Or, will I first have to download Lion, and then go to Software Updates to THEN download the security update/patch?

    Thanks guys!
     
  7. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #7
    Since it now appears SL is end of life, yes it makes sense to move to an OS version that is still getting security updates.

    I answered your remaining questions in your other thread.
     
  8. Morod macrumors 68000

    Morod

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2008
    Location:
    On The Nickel, over there....
    #8
    Foe what it's worth, I'm on 10.6.8 as well, and I plan on staying with it for as long as I possibly can.
    I like it, it does what I want it to, and it works for me.
    Hopefully there are enough SL holdouts that Apple will continue security updates for it. Best of luck in whatever you choose to do!
     
  9. Fishrrman macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #9
    In complete agreement with the post directly above this one.

    I still use SL on a couple of my Macs.
    It runs fine and I'll keep using it for a while longer.
    Those Macs don't require a great deal of "protection", as there's nothing confidential or sensitive stored on them.

    No use getting tied up in knots over highly-esoteric "security warnings" over this or that.
    I'm not saying "there's no danger". But the "level of danger" is sufficiently small enough and remote enough so that the risks of using an older Mac system aren't great enough to compel me to switch them over.

    (Aside: there are older Macs that -can't- be upgraded, that still work, and will continue to work for years).
     
  10. Sky Blue Guest

    Sky Blue

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
    #10
    Yup, Snow Leopard is dead. Wouldn't be surprised if the next major version of iTunes doesn't support it.
     

Share This Page