Several reasons why public dislike police in America

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by LIVEFRMNYC, Aug 12, 2014.

  1. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #1
  2. G51989 macrumors 68030

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    Generally the police have lost the trust of lots of Americans. They have yet to earn it back.
     
  3. Huntn macrumors G5

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    Everyone is prejudice to some degree and profile/react to other races based on those prejudices. The groups that have the advantage in society will have more opportunities to have their views represented in law enforcement. It's something we as a race need to work on.
     
  4. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    Um... what's your point? Are you trying to start a discussion of some sort or do you just want to bash law enforcement? First, there is not a profession on earth where some idiot hasn't done something stupid, abusive, or just plain wrong. Does that mean that everyone in that profession is like that, no.

    I have many friends in law enforcement and fire fighting. They are tough careers, jobs where they generally see people at their worst day in and day out. It's by far an incredibly difficult and dangerous profession. Are there bad apples sure, but why take that as a reason to bash the profession as a whole?

    Seriously, how about we post some videos of the countless positive acts of service that law officers do day in and day out in this country.
     
  5. NT1440 macrumors G4

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    Why?

    The problem is not when the police do their jobs correctly, it's the ever expanding use of military tactics and over escalation of force that is the issue. Not to mention the clear racial disparities that is a major component.
     
  6. bradl macrumors 68040

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    I'm game.

    Dateline: Eau Claire, WI. Police officer stops traffic to help a family of ducks and ducklings cross the street, ensuring they aren't run over and killed:




    It's things like these that they not only do for their fellow man, but because they restore our faith in humanity after people concentrating only on the cynical and negative, that we at least owe them our thanks and gratitude for doing what they do.

    People want us to 'support our troops', yet they do nothing for those that put their lives on the line for us every day while we can go to work in our air conditioned offices and come home every night. I can tell you with certainty that while I was a child and innocently would go outside and play, that my mother would, on the inside, be worried about if my father would be coming home that night at all, or if something happened to him while on duty.

    People really do seem to forget what LEOs do, and need to have a good swift kick in their complacency to be reminded.

    BL.
     
  7. colourfastt macrumors 6502a

    colourfastt

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    I spent 10 years doing EMS in the 80s & 90s and will state uncategorically that I respected the police UNTIL I worked along side them. Now I don't trust any cop even as far as I could throw the US Capitol building.
     
  8. LIVEFRMNYC thread starter macrumors 603

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    When your a part of something, you also have to take some of the brunt. I think most of us have sense to know that not all are bad. But just like sports, people will criticize a team as a whole as well as specific players.

    Maybe if the cop culture would change internally, they would better enforce each other. This would change public opinion about cops as a whole.


    Cause that's their job. When a service is not being performed correctly, attention needs to be made of it. Do you call your cable or phone carrier just to tell them what a wonderful service they are?
     
  9. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    I respect your opinion and realize that it is based on your personal experience. That being said, I think it's still short sighted to judge an entire profession group based on the actions of a subset of that group.

    I think you would agree that there are certainly some EMT's who need to be bounced out of the profession for one reason or another, but that doesn't mean all in the EMS service are worthy of being disliked, disrespected, or distrusted.
     
  10. bradl macrumors 68040

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    Amelia Earhart made the concerted effort to thank each and every ATC controller she was talking to for the tireless job they have of keeping each aircraft up in the air and separated in their airspace everywhere she was flying.

    A simple compliment can make someone's day, while cynicism does nothing for anyone.

    BL.
     
  11. Technarchy macrumors 604

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  12. capathy21 macrumors 65816

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    #12
    Is this just due to corruption?
     
  13. NT1440 macrumors G4

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    I think it actually takes more effort to ignore that the major police departments in the USA (NYC, Boston, LA, Atlanta, etc) have an issue with police brutality and excessive force. The numbers are the numbers.
     
  14. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    Then the officers who are not doing the job correctly should be dealt with directly. The team analogy is applicable, but not entirely accurate. When one officer or a pair of officers are handling a situation there are no other "team members" present. An officer is often making decisions, possibly life threatening decisions, on their own. If any specific officer has proven not capable of handling this level of responsibility then the appropriate response is to deal directly with that officer, not to blame all those in the profession.

    To your point about changing "cop culture", what do you know of law enforcement culture? Are you in that profession? Do you have a family member in that profession? How does law enforcement culture differ in different parts of our country? My point is that those of us outside of the profession don't know what is going on "inside" or what objectives/initiatives they are addressing. I don't think public opinion regarding law enforcement, at least in my experience, is overly negative. Not where I live or amongst the majority of those I know. I think Bradl said it well in his post, there are always going to be those who are "cynical and negative", but we need to be careful when we use words like "public" because that comes across as an assumption that the majority feel a certain way.

    I'm glad you brought this up because I think it is reflective of our culture's current condition. There are times where I feel like our greatest virtue in America has become selfishness instead of selflessness. We look at people's professions and instead of seeing it as something we should be grateful that someone does, we look at it from a service oriented perspective that only takes into account whether our needs and desires have been met in the way we think they should. Do problems need to be corrected, sure they do. Do bad apples need to be dealt with, of course. But, I firmly believe that one's worldview is greatly impacted by whether they look at things with an attitude of gratitude or with an attitude of self-centeredness.

    You asked if I call my cable/phone company just to tell them "what a wonderful service they are"? Well, um yeah I have done that and I've tried to do it with other services as well. In fact, just last week I asked to speak with a manager at a restaurant just to tell them that our server had done an excellent job and had such a pleasant attitude. Our world has become so cynical that we seem to always be looking for where or how someone has failed to live up to our expectations. For goodness sakes, the word has even become a part of our slang vocabulary now (FAIL)!

    When I see a soldier, fireman, law officer, etc. I purposefully make an effort to thank them for their willingness to serve day in and day out in a job that most people don't appreciate. They don't do it for the money, they generally do it because the have a innate desire to serve others.

    You know what this "positive attitude" has done for me? Well, first it's changed how I interact with almost everyone around me. I'm more of an encourager than I've ever been. Why put others down when you can contribute to building them up? Some of those calls I've made to express appreciation for services or a job well done, have turned into free credits or bonus services. That wasn't my intention in making the call, but customer service reps were so surprised to hear something positive from someone that they wanted to be gracious themselves.

    Look, bottom line is this, the human race is inconsistent and self serving by nature. We could all use more optimism, encouragement, and positivity in our lives. I'm tired of seeing people bash those in helping professions who are consistently trying to serve others. Let's weed out the bad apples and work toward consistent improvement, but can we do so without being stereotypical, accusatory, cynical, and negative.
     
  15. LIVEFRMNYC thread starter macrumors 603

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    I don't know much about the cop culture, but one thing I do know is that they only look out for themselves. A cop ratting on another cop is equivalent to a gangsta ratting on the mafia. I'm in my late 30's. I've witnessed a ton of police brutality before cell phones were a norm. I've been in court rooms with friends and family for support and sometimes as a witness, only to watch the so-called good police give a completely differ story than what actually happened towards another officer's favor. If you think this is not a regular occurrence, you're highly mistaken.

    Internal Affairs and the blue wall of silence has to go. That's the culture that needs to go.



    Would you overlook deteriorating structure of a bridge and just be thankful it gets you across to the other side, or would you make it a priority to complain about it?

    You say my comment is reflective of our culture's current condition. But I think being defensive is even a bigger reflection of our culture. If complaints go unanswered, and the same thing keeps going on, what do really expect from the public? Surely not compliments.
     
  16. VulchR macrumors 68020

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    When I go back home to the US I trust the police, for I believe that most of the police are genuinely good people, if a little authoritarian for my tastes. But then again I do not belong to a minority and where I visit the police can be very biased... In any case, I certainly trust the police as people more than the politicians who make policy for them. I'd make a lousy police officer, and no salary would be high enough for me to take a job in which I have to put up with as much crap as the police.
     
  17. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    I know that I’m not a US citizen, but IMO.

    The use of Stop and Search, which is shown to target ethnic minorities more.

    The militarization of the police force, which takes nearly all human contact out of nearly every inter-action.

    The staggering amount of videos on YouTube showing police behaving badly, hasn’t helped.
     
  18. LIVEFRMNYC thread starter macrumors 603

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    Yea, I've experienced the way police actually police does depend on the actual neighborhood and sometimes your ethnicity.

    I live in a pretty good populated neighborhood. Police don't mess with anyone, with the exception of speeding tickets. They don't even bother the drunk fights in front of the bars, and don't bother nobody using public parks even after it's officially closed. My neighborhood is very mixed as well and it's mostly upper middle and upper class with small pockets of lower class and rich. Everyone gets along among all classes. Mostly everyone drives nice cars with tinted windows. Nobody gets tickets from that either.

    Now when I go to my old neighborhood(which is mostly lower class), it's a complete differ story. Police want to be anal about everything. They will jump out a unmarked parked car in a group of five and frisk you just for minding your own business. Driving a nice car? Good luck trying not to get pulled over with four patrol cars as backup like your Hannibal. Kids playing on sidewalk? Break it up, your blocking pedestrian traffic even if nobody else is around. People playing basketball? Court closes at 8pm, break it up and go do something unproductive. I can go on and on and on about the bad relationship with police and lower class communities. I will admit some of it is deserved and should be blamed on the idiots that ruin things for others, but most of it is just complete lack of respect for the people in these neighborhoods.
     
  19. mscriv macrumors 601

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    I think you might be missing my point. I don't have a problem with complaints when they are warranted. I've said multiple times in my posts here that if there is a problem with a specific officer, department, policy, etc. then those situations need to be dealt with. Bad apples should go. Being a law enforcement officer is extremely difficult and those who can't do the job well should be moved along to another profession. Accountability is very important in any profession, but especially ones dealing with public protection, safety, and order.

    My frustration is with the overly cynical stereotyping and negativity we see often directed at law enforcement. One unethical cop doesn't mean they're all unethical. Abuse of power by some officers doesn't mean every officer is a power junkie waiting to go authoritarian on someone. I would like to see people stop using the "broad brush" to paint with and instead uphold the ideal of personal responsibility. Each of us is responsible for our own actions so let's stop all the generalizing. That's what drives me crazy.

    To use your own example, if I crossed a "deteriorating bridge" I would certainly alert the appropriate authorities of the danger is poses. What I wouldn't do is assume that just because this one bridge was deteriorating that it's unsafe for me to ever cross another bridge again. That's just silly.

    I'm sorry to hear about the negative experiences your family has had with law enforcement. I can understand why you are frustrated and passionate about this issue. But, let's hold those specific officers and anyone else involved in the situation accountable and not say those incidents serve as some kind of evidence to make negative statements about all police or the profession in general. That's all I'm asking.
     
  20. LIVEFRMNYC thread starter macrumors 603

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    But I said in the same post you quoted that complaints go unanswered and it's more of the same vs any change. Here's a quick Google search example, and definitely why Internal Affairs need to go and cops needs cameras on their person.

    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/2...ases-against-new-jersey-police-officers.shtml


    This is needed .........

    [​IMG]
     
  21. rhett7660 macrumors G4

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    I agree completely and what this doesn't tell you is how many frivolous law suits and complaints were found to be false when they did complain. I love this idea and hope it does come to the officers.

    Then we also get to see how people can be towards officers when they don't know they are being filmed. :D
     
  22. LIVEFRMNYC thread starter macrumors 603

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    Exactly, I'm not being one sided here. I don't expect the majority of complaints to be legit, but those numbers are ridiculous. I doubt they even read the complaints.

    And yes, cameras would also make it easier for the good officers.
     
  23. G51989 macrumors 68030

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    Speaking of that, look at this

    http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2014...igated-after-being-involved-in-serious-crash/


    If this was a civvie, or even more so a Hispanic or black man. They would probably go to jail and this wouldn't be an issue.

    But because he's a cop, the Justice system is going to let him walk.

    ----------

    I agree, and hurt the bad ones.

    I think most cops are good, but there are lots of cops in America, that have destroyed the reputation of the American police.

    I don't care if I am asked my report as a witness, or pulled over for speeding, or taken in for whatever reason ( even tho I don't commit crimes ), I will not speak to the Police anymore without a lawyer present.
     
  24. G51989 macrumors 68030

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    I don't think ANYONE here is saying all Police are bad, sure I said officer Gravy Down south isn't really a cop, more like a money maker.

    I don't all Police are bad, I've never said that once and I never will. I know people in the NYPD. Its a tough job, and not every police officer will ever pull it off perfectly.

    The point of this thread is, that Police are using more and more force, and killing more and more unarmed people than they ever have in American history.

    And this is exactly why the American people have lost trust in their Police officers.

    Like it or not, that is what has happened.

    The Police as a whole need to make some serious changes if they want the trust of the American people back.
     
  25. anonymouslurker macrumors regular

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    You do realize that whether you like it or not, using drugs is a crime, right?
     

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