Sharing Textbooks = Piracy, Also, You Must Buy Textbooks For All Courses.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by AP_piano295, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

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    A man of the people. The right sort of people.
    #2
    Grades for cash. Very.. educational..

    Much of academia is common-sense wrapped up in 'coined' phraseology. Not worth payin for some numpty who wants his name published so he can circle jerk in the staff room. Unfortunately markers do look for those phrases and explanations of them regardless.
     
  2. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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  3. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #4
    I hate DRM, but I acknowledge a company's right to make and sell a product. Back when it was paper books, sure you could share but it was one heck of an inconvenience. Electronic books are different. My big issue with ebook is that you should be able to share a book for some period of time with a couple other people. For novels, this works great. Not so good for a text books though.
     
  4. malman89 macrumors 68000

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    #5
    Begin key gen programs for textbooks... worked well for games, so why not?

    ----------

    As far as I know, no institution uses e-books on even a semi-notable scale, and sorry, it's not happening any time soon. If any do, I bet it's a random course or even slimmer - random professors of random sections. Of course discounting some potentially tech savvy humanities profs (ebooks of classics that are already free to obtain).
     
  5. vega07 macrumors 65816

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    #6
    Thank the Lord I am done with undergrad.

    There are plenty of solutions and they come up with this? Stupid.
     
  6. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #7
    I noticed more and more professors using their own handouts and less textbook as the years went on. Lets hope this trend continues. I always bought used international copies of the textbooks on ebay.
     
  7. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #8
    The killing of used book is a problem. Sorry but the text book publishing industry is beyond crap. They do "new editions" now at less than every 18 months. The "new editions" are just reordering the homework problems. Everything else lines up page for page the same.
    Oh yeah and different colors on the cover. Other than that they are the exact same book.

    It is crap and really college need to start saying F you to the text book industry in mass numbers for the crap updates. My first college they abandon one publisher over the crap update process that was going fast and still having errors that should of been fix in the 2nd edition in there 8th. THey said nope change publishers over that fact.
     
  8. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #9
    This is just another silly publisher ploy. They used to re-arrange chapters at times without really changing the content just to discourage used books. It can get pretty ridiculous.
     
  9. MorphingDragon, Jun 10, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2012

    MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #10
    In New Zealand most of the Universities encourage e-Resources. The University of Waikato almost demands that you use e-Learning and Internet Resources, you just have to use your own discretion as for what's a valid resource or not. We also get discounts for Safari Books.

    The lecturers write their own course supplements a lot of the time and sell it for cheap or just plain make all the lecture planning available. It's not common to have homework problems from textbooks, in fact the only time I remember having textbook problems was in the bridging course. (I failed High School) Even then the textbooks are available from the library on course reserve.

    I bought textbooks, in my first year - never again. The only one I use is my Linear Algebra book because finding good explanations on the internet is almost hopeless.
     
  10. B777Forevar macrumors 6502a

    B777Forevar

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    #11
    I wish uni was like hs. Where they would loan you the text books.

    The amount I have payed for books only to use for one semester is outrageous.
     
  11. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #12
    This is actually one of the saddest articles I have read in a long time.


    All this does is prove the difference between being clever and being intelligent. Some "professor". I guess knowledge is just another commodity to him. Since publishers have been doing this for quite a while now, I wonder what the novel idea is. Well, who cares.

    It is time to abolish "textbooks".
     
  12. malman89 macrumors 68000

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    #13
    Perhaps I'm misunderstanding, but there's a huge difference in my mind from e-books and "e-Resources." I'm thinking of e-Resources as supplements or piecemeal parts that somehow constitute a whole, whether that's an online interactive portion, online articles from academic journals, or other academic sources. Not the same as an e-book (not saying it's any worse though) and a different conversation. I feel in this situation an e-book is solely limited to probably just an electronic copy of a print book, or rarely an interactive e-book like that one example pushed by Apple in their old presser that is far from the norm.

    A fair amount of teachers did push their own course supplements, but they were mostly printed collections of journals and chapters from textbooks binded and sold from the bookstore at cost - although at a fair savings. That's not weird here either.

    I also almost never had many textbooks in college while studying History, Classics and Political Science. The main ones I can think of were just from my language (German/Italian/Latin sort of) classes. I also lucked out on a professor re-publishing his textbook, but not being on sale, so he just gave us the whole thing in a PDF. Anyone savvy enough to hunt down library copies or Amazon on the cheap could get away without spending much money at all.
     
  13. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    #14
    This is quite a stretch. To say that buying a used textbook is as damaging as piracy is just silly in my opinion. When I was in school you could sell your books back to the school bookstore for a discounted price and then they would sell the used copies to future students at a discounted rate from what a new book costs. This system helped the publisher make money on the original sale, the school make money on the resale, and students save money by either getting money back or getting a discounted price for a used book. I would think an economics professor would understand such a system is quite ethical and functional in a free market.

    I bet this "mission" he's on has a lot more to do with the following:
    This sounds like the "I scratch your back you scratch mine" kind of relationships that put pharmaceutical companies and doctors under such scrutiny years ago. In those cases it was so and so doctor who prescribed such and such scripts per year won such and such prize. It wouldn't be much of a stretch to see textbook publishers give preferred publishing to the teachers who use their textbooks the most and thus bring in the most revenue. Of course this is just wild speculation on my part, but the claims this professor is making are fishy. If the ethical position he's putting forward was valid then it would revolutionize the "used" market for all products.
     
  14. AP_piano295 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #15
    I generally speaking don't buy them anymore, most teachers use them only as a supplement the most relevant tested material comes from their lectures.

    (the exception in my case being math and chemistry classes, the physics problems are done digitally through lon-capa)

    Of course we're technically required to buy the textbook, but I'm un-willing to spend 150.00 on a book which I wont do more than glance at. Especially since I can generally answer my questions more quickly and thoroughly through the internet.
     
  15. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #16
    That truly depends on your major. The amount of time I spent referencing my tech books in a lot of my classes was rather insane but then again they were good text books for it.
     
  16. AP_piano295 thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #17
    Biology and chemistry for me, I spend a-lot of time referencing other papers for biology classes (very little time referencing my textbooks).

    Textbooks are critical for chemistry and math but generally for the problem sets.

    Of course the vast majority of material in those textbooks is quite old, and the only reason I have to buy a newer version is so I can access the correct HW problems.
     
  17. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #18
    Like I said, we get a Safari Books discount, so e-Books are encouraged.
     
  18. Carlanga macrumors 604

    Carlanga

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  19. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #20
    My bad... I focused on this:

    and somehow thought it was ebooks the reference was too. I skimmed the article and missed:

    All I can say is what a crock. Next thing the car manufacturers will want car onwership assigned to an owner forever. :rolleyes:
     
  20. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #21
    Sir, is that car pirated?
     
  21. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #22

    Don't look now, but, OnStar already has hooks in place:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OnStar

    I'm not saying GM would do that. But, someday it could.
     
  22. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #23
    As I said depends on your major. My major was Computer science so I referencing them pretty heavy for assignments and how to do things. It was easier to go threw the book that it was to search for it on the net because the internet has a lot more noise on the subject matter I would be looking into. At the very least the book would let me define the search better to cut threw a lot of the noise.
     
  23. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

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    #24
    At postgrad level, a lot of the time Textbooks just don't cut the mustard. I'm working on a Heuristic that can be applied to 2D convex hull algorithm so they can trivially scale to arbitrary dimensions and guarantee the closed mesh. If your first response if Eh? you're doing just as well as most databases and libraries.
     
  24. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #25
    The sad part is that not completely foreign to me but you have a subject matter than has a lot less noise to it and can be a lot easier to find.

    On fine point question I would jump on the internet but other items say on how multi threading in C#. I found it was easier to go to the book first and then move onto the internet with much better search topics.
     

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