Should citizens who are on goverment benefits or unemployed lose their right to vote?

G51989

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Feb 25, 2012
2,506
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
I hear this from people I know on the right quite a bit, and I have seen it more than once from pro GOP and right wing sites.

Example

In reading the article about public assistance agencies ramping up efforts to register people to vote, I’m reminded that when I registered to vote at 18 years old (43 years ago), I went looking for the registrar’s office.

I made a few phone calls, found out where the office was and took it upon myself to get registered.

I wanted to vote and be part of this representative republic. If people don’t have enough interest or ambition to get themselves registered to vote, I don’t think we should be chasing after them, “begging” them to vote. My guess is they will not be very informed voters. Those kinds of voters are likely to vote for candidates based on looks or feelings and not on the issues.

In my opinion, people on public assistance should not be allowed to vote as long as they are receiving it. At the point they apply and are qualified for welfare, I believe they should be required to sign away their voting rights until they no longer require assistance. At that point, their voting rights would be reinstated.

This seems to me neither heartless nor unfair but completely just.

We all know that those on public assistance would be more inclined to vote for those candidates that promise the most. It’s just our human nature.

The system is ripe for corruption and fraud. I am not opposed to public assistance in certain cases, but we have to admit the abuses of the system are everywhere.

This seems like a simple, logical fix, but that’s just me.

Should those are are unemployed or on assistance programs lose the right to vote?

Yes or no?
 

jkcerda

macrumors 6502a
Jun 10, 2013
682
39,037
Criminal Mexi Midget
yes, some should be burned at the stake as well to teach them not to be poor :eek:

[/sarcasm

Birth - "All persons born or naturalized" "are citizens" of the United States and the U.S. state where they reside (14th Amendment, 1868)
"Race, color, or previous condition of servitude" - (15th Amendment, 1870)
"On account of sex" - (19th Amendment, 1920)
In Washington, D.C., presidential elections (23rd Amendment, 1961)
(For federal elections) "By reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax" - (24th Amendment, 1964)
(For state elections) Taxes - (14th Amendment; Harper v. Virginia Board of Elections, 383 U.S. 663 (1966))
"Who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of age" (26th Amendment, 1971).
Requirement that a person reside in a jurisdiction for an extended period of time (14th Amendment; Dunn v. Blumstein, 405 U.S. 330 (1972))[4][5][5]
In addition, the 17th Amendment provided for the direct election of United States Senators.

The "right to vote" is not explicitly stated in the U.S. Constitution
except in the above referenced amendments, and only in reference to the fact that the franchise cannot be denied or abridged based solely on the aforementioned qualifications. In other words, the "right to vote" is perhaps better understood, in layman's terms, as only prohibiting certain forms of legal discrimination in establishing qualifications for suffrage. States may deny the "right to vote" for other reasons.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voting_rights_in_the_United_States

would any here be ok with I.D being required in order for you to vote?

 
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G51989

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Feb 25, 2012
2,506
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
Sadly for some of us it's almost EVERYONE we know.

I live in PA, it's one of the most backwards states in the country aside from the few big cities (Pittsburgh, Philly, Harrisburg).
I was gonna say.

I have TONS of family in Pittsburgh PA, and as far as cities go. And I've been all over the world, I can say this about visiting Pittsburgh, it has incredible cultural wonders, amazing buildings and bridges for its size, amazingly nice people who seem to be VERY liberal and tolerant compared to the rest of PA, some of the best food I've ever had in my life. An incredible skyline and riverside, and an accent I can't put my finger on but l love.

I feel Pittsburgh has to be one of the most underrated cities in the world.

----------

I think you need to be far more selective about who you mix with.
Honestly, most of them are people I knew growing up who are on my facebook.
 

Macky-Mac

macrumors 68030
May 18, 2004
2,589
1,142
We all know that those on public assistance would be more inclined to vote for those candidates that promise the most. It’s just our human nature.
so maybe those who benefit from a tax cut should also lose their right to vote.....after all we know they're just going to vote for those candidates that promise the most. It's just our human nature. :p


the principal expressed wouldn't really leave many, if any, voters would it?
 

Macky-Mac

macrumors 68030
May 18, 2004
2,589
1,142
Sadly for some of us it's almost EVERYONE we know.

I live in PA, it's one of the most backwards states in the country aside from the few big cities (Pittsburgh, Philly, Harrisburg).
from an election or two ago, I remember a story about a pollster working in PA ......the story itself was amusing but the description of PA was relevant to your post.......PA being a place consisting of Pittsburg and Philly with Alabama between them :p
 

G51989

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Feb 25, 2012
2,506
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
from an election or two ago, I remember a story about a pollster working in PA ......the story itself was amusing but the description of PA was relevant to your post.......PA being a place consisting of Pittsburg and Philly with Alabama between them :p
Having family in PA, been to Pittsburgh and Philly a lot for family and I've been doing business in Pittsburgh PA lately.

100% agree.
 

Jessica Lares

macrumors G3
Oct 31, 2009
9,200
722
Near Dallas, Texas, USA
I find that offensive as a disabled person who is discriminated enough. Just because I look a certain way (from birth defects and half finished surgeries - don't worry, my parents paid for those :rolleyes:) and talk differently (because of a speech problem), doesn't mean I'm stupid. Hell, I got into pretty much every society there is in high school and was known for being smart. I watch the news, read the news, and debate the news just like everyone else.

There's a bigger picture to a candidate than what they are "promising" to give people on these programs.
 

noodlemanc

macrumors regular
Mar 25, 2010
208
17
Australasia
so maybe those who benefit from a tax cut should also lose their right to vote.....after all we know they're just going to vote for those candidates that promise the most. It's just our human nature. :p


the principal expressed wouldn't really leave many, if any, voters would it?
That's right. Many, if not most people vote to socialise the their costs. Companies and the rich want tax breaks, the retired want social security, parents want children's services, the unemployed want unemployment benefits, gov't employees want public-sector benefits etc etc...
 

rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,409
Why just welfare? Why not tax breaks and/or credits or subsidies too? If you're sucking off the public tit, you don't vote. :rolleyes:

For a country that holds itself up to the world as a bastion of freedom, we sure do make it hard for our population to vote.
 

Zombie Acorn

macrumors 65816
Feb 2, 2009
1,301
9,062
Toronto, Ontario
If there was an actual problem with voter fraud of course I'd support ID requirements. But if there isn't a problem then it's just big government for the sake of it.
Who is going to investigate this and how? If we aren't checking people's ID when they vote they could have registered as anyone and voted. They could also be showing up for your court trial in the jury. The left loves to act like there couldn't be a problem while restricting the only method that could show it. No one is going to show up to vote and tell you they are illegal, they may have been here so long that they don't even remember that they don't have voting status. A free national ID should be issued to anyone who requests it with a valid SSN and ID should be required.

As for welfare, I think they should be offered extra money to take a birth control shot and be handed a bag of condoms.
 

Tsuchiya

macrumors 68020
Jun 7, 2008
2,309
367
lolwut

We all know that those on public assistance would be more inclined to vote for those candidates that promise the most. It’s just our human nature.
I love how these nut bags try to write eloquently in an attempt to hide a dumb ****ing argument.
 

Eraserhead

macrumors G4
Nov 3, 2005
10,300
10,387
UK
Who is going to investigate this and how? If we aren't checking people's ID when they vote they could have registered as anyone and voted.
There is an ID check, just not a photo ID check. You have to say what your name and address is and that is matched against the voting records.

If you can point to evidence showing that anyone is deliberately suppressing research into this I'll change my mind.
 

Zombie Acorn

macrumors 65816
Feb 2, 2009
1,301
9,062
Toronto, Ontario
There is an ID check, just not a photo ID check.
Where is the ID check? When I voted they asked my name and looked it up in the book and marked it off, nothing else. Are you from the US/have you voted there?

Anyone can submit a registration card.

Another scenario would be to open an unlimited seating theater to the public, but require no tickets to verify people paid. Prove that people are coming to the theater illegally. Revenues are handled by another department.
 
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Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
We require an ID to purchase alcohol, purchase cigarettes, enter a federal building, check into a hotel, use a credit card, cash a check, pick up a prescription, etc, etc. Isn't voting more important than all of these things?

The state of Georgia was one of the first states to have a Voter ID law. A Voter ID has no cost and can be picked up at all 159 County Registrar's Offices or any DDS (think DMV) location. These are the same locations that you go to register to vote or cast an early voting ballot.

Why is it such a bad idea to verify the identity of those voting? Is this not worth protecting? Some say voter fraud isn't a problem so we don't need to worry about it, yet... Why wait until after an election is stolen before doing something to protect it? Then there are those that will try and say that it hurts minorities. I'm not buying it. You can't convince me that minorities are less able to figure out where to get their free ID than non-minorities.

In Georgia more minorities have voted in every election since passing the law, than before.

Still, the law has had real and measurable effect for some voters: Since November 2008, the ballots of 1,586 Georgians didn’t count because of the law. (They arrived at the polls without a photo ID, cast provisional ballots, and did not return later with the required ID.) Overall, 13.6 million votes were cast in the state during the same period.
Only 1,586 people in four years had their votes not counted because they didn't come back and show the required identification, out of 13,600,000 votes.
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
8,914
1,596
New England, USA
Absolutely! All recipients of any government programs should be denied the rights of citizenship.

I mean...all those slacker slobs receiving Social Security and Medicare...what are they doing for the country! A bunch of feeble old slobs just sucking on the government teat!

The Inuits had it right...when someone became a burden, or a drain, on the group, and were unable to contribute for any reason...put them on an ice flow and bye-bye.






:rolleyes::rolleyes: <----Two...just to be clear.