Should it be a crime to pay for sex?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by edesignuk, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #1
    BBC.

    All seems very confusing and utterly pointless to me. Go after the people doing the trafficking, forcing people against their will etc. Don't criminalise everyone.

    Some people want to be prostitutes, some people want to use prostitutes, what's the harm? In places where it's legalised and regulated everything seems to go fine. Everyone is happy, including the government as they tax them.

    Pulling crap like this will only make it an even darker and shadier market, and 10 times worse for everyone involved.

    P.S. Jacqui Smith is a tit. I'm getting to the point I'd happily vote for another party purely based on the crap this woman keeps on pushing through. Will we be able to make any decisions for our selves soon???

    I'm off to a brothel to smoke some weed and bitch about ID cards Jacqui, bite me.
     
  2. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #2
    It's such a complex issue... I think we need to create a new forum for it.
     
  3. stevento macrumors 6502

    stevento

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    #3
    No. It should not be a crime to pay for sex. Hookers on the street are sex trafficked so thats a different story.
     
  4. swiftaw macrumors 603

    swiftaw

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    #4
    Yeah, next thing you know they'll be regulating our thoughts.
     
  5. Osarkon macrumors 68020

    Osarkon

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    #5
    *smacks head against wall* Out, out of my head!!


    So basically from my interpretation it's still fine if they're doing it on their own? That's completely open to abuse.

    Besides, like has already been mentioned, I don't see the harm if it's just regulated and legalised. It wouldn't be such a taboo thing then.
     
  6. eluk macrumors 6502a

    eluk

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    #6
    It's not the problem of paying for sex, but all the criminality behind it that they are trying to stamp out.
     
  7. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #7
    Not to be trite, but doesn't everyone pay for sex in some fashion?

    Be it cash, credit, dinner, taking out the trash or admitting you're wrong...etc.

    Why the distinctions? I am only partially joking...

    Two freely-consenting adults should be able to do what they want, with a an eye on realistic consequences for their actions - right?
     
  8. edesignuk thread starter Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #8
    Which is fine, but doing this won't stamp it out at all. It'll give more people stupid criminal records, waste police time that should be spent actually dealing with the real criminals in this, and likely make the women suffer even more as the whole thing gets pushed further and further under ground.

    oh, and Jacqui will probably figure out a way for it to all cost a few billion too.
     
  9. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

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    #9
    Jacqui Smith is a dried up old hag who has nothing better to do than throw her weight around. I think there are far better people to fill our prisons with than weed smokers and people who may want the occasional prostitute. Those aren't the easy targets though are they, Jacqui? :rolleyes:
     
  10. Mord macrumors G4

    Mord

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  11. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #11
    Without looking at the details of the legislation, I am partially in favour of criminalising pimping and those who make use of pimped women. But that's not the question of the thread title.

    And many women, probably most, don't want to be prostitutes. They rarely turn to it out of choice, despite the tales of high-paid escorts. Women like that are a tip of the iceberg.

    And even in Amsterdam, they're starting to crack down.

    The thing is, it touches on deep dynamics of power and money over the objectification of women. If you can buy a person for your sexual pleasure, it says uncomfortable things about human relations in this day and age. Most prostitutes, in the UK at least, are not doing it freely.
     
  12. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #12
    The other problem with legislation like this is that it forces prostitution underground. This is a public health nightmare and terrible for everyone involved.

    Unfortunately as BV pointed out it's such a multifaceted issue that there's really no magic bullet. Arguably supplying education, support, and alternate employment would be an optimal legislative angle. I'm not sure there would be many women (if any) that wouldn't chose to escape it if they had the means.
     
  13. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

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    #13
    How is a person to know if there is a pimp involved or not? Now with this new legislation asking that question will almost certainly mean a dishonest answer and even more people in prison.

    I think it's a step backwards. Prostitution should be legal so that safety measures could be put in place for both worker and client involved. From what little I know of the industry, if you will, it seems like a dangerous time and that could be prevented. I don't think criminalizing more is the answer.
     
  14. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #14
    I don't know. I haven't read the legislation. The entire issue is full of shades of grey.

    In a perfect world, as consenting adults, we should be free to make the decisions over our bodies and money as we see fit. However, when you start involving third parties and other related factors relating to trafficking and consent, then the entire picture starts getting clouded very quickly.

    Like I said, the thread title is almost a different topic from the brief description of the legislation, if that makes sense.
     
  15. edesignuk thread starter Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #15
    Feel free to deviate from the title of the threads direct question ;) It was just the title the BBC used for their article (which they've since changed!).

    I don't pretend it's simple or easy, but I don't think this is the way forward.
     
  16. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

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    #16
    ^ No, I'm with you BV. It's those shades of grey, and many other colours I am sure I am not familiar with, that make me think that slapping another criminal offence on the problem isn't likely to be a great solution. But then, I have no respect for the decisions of Jacqui Smith. She gets an idea of what she wants to do and does it without any regard to the advice she is given from her advisers. That pisses me off. I will typically be against criminalization of things which I feel are our own decisions to make. <trying not to go onto tangents the best that I can>
     
  17. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #17
    I'm not surprised they've changed the title. The entire issue of prostitution can be cast in so many different ways, depending on how the question is asked.

    And the other problem is, is that some of these laws are steeped in centuries of tradition. The crime of soliciting used to be used against all sorts of people.

    I dunno. Anyone want to make a quick buck? BV has an itch that needs scratching. :D
     
  18. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #18
    Me too. I doubt it would do much, but after seeing a pimp attacking "his bitch", and then have that pimp attack me, I'm not too fond of pimps. People can sell themselves for sex if that's their choice, but I hate the idea of pimping or people smuggling and such.

    Stop the trafficking, stop the pimping. I don't mind if there's prostitution.
     
  19. Much Ado macrumors 68000

    Much Ado

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    #19
    Legalise the world's oldest proffesion, tax it, regulate it, keep tabs on who is using it, check up on the prositutes to look for signs of violence/misconduct, provide 'safehouses' that are clean and secure to work in.

    Then go after underground prostitution, forcing demand to the new, safer, better legal alternative.
     
  20. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #20
    And to add, I think in terms of conventionally-accepted terms of heterosexual prostitution, then it's an issue for men to think about deeply.

    Why are some men happy to pay for a service from a stranger that they would hate to see their mothers or sisters do? The whole issue is entwined with notions of power, ownership, free will, money... sex, which comes with so many taboos of its own.

    Many years ago when the notion of marriage was different in western societies at least, is there any scandal in claiming the following:

    Deep waters.
     
  21. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #21
    It is indeed a complex question. I think the personal freedom part is fine but lets not kid ourselves it's primarily exploitation,it's no coincidence that the majority of female prostitutes in the U.K. are at present from Eastern Europe. This is not a choice (generally) it's desperation. Seeing as this is the PRSI forum it's only right to point out the alienation caused by present political/economic systems.:)
     
  22. és: macrumors 6502a

    és:

    #22
    I agree with all but two points of the first post:

    I disagree. She's much, much worse than that.

    On a more serious note, I won't be voting for anybody else other than Labour. I hate what they have become, they don't represent me and they are a disgrace to what the party is meant to be. However, the other choice is just further down the same path.
     
  23. és: macrumors 6502a

    és:

    #23
    It's exploitation in the current form. Regulated prostitution, whilst still a bit grim in my opinion, allows the girls to receive a fair price, get checked for disease, work in safety etc.

    Whilst I don't like it, it seems the only sensible option. It's going to happen whether it's regulated or not, and by regulating it everyone benefits. No more tarts on the corner, no more crack addled whores that are riddled with disease and nor more violence.
     
  24. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #24
    I think a forum where Social Issues such as this are a primary topic. ;)
     
  25. Lau Guest

    #25
    I think BV's right in that there are so many complex and difficult issues here.

    In theory, the idea of it being legal if both parties are consenting is a good one, given that it is always going to happen, but I think it is very, very rarely that simple.

    I read an interesting article written by a (possible former) prostitute on the BBC website a while back explaining why the legalisation argument was such a difficult one, and it raised a few points that hadn't occurred to me at all. One of those, if I remember rightly, was that if it was legal and there were legal brothels run by the workers themselves, there would have to be regulations regarding drug use and STDs and so on. Because a fair few people working as prostitutes were drug users, say, they then wouldn't be able to be working in such a place, and so then get pushed properly underground, with no regulations at all, and no police protection and so on, and end up in a far worse position than they would ever have done with the current "not legal but tolerated" situation.

    I'll see if I can find the article, as I remember it being good.
     

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