Should people who have gone to catholic schools, seminary or other religious school..

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by dinaluvsApple, Jun 24, 2010.

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Should students with religious based education be allowed into science programs?

  1. Yes!

    76.7%
  2. No!

    11.6%
  3. yes, but tested more strictly!

    11.6%
  1. dinaluvsApple macrumors regular

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    #1
    be allowed into colleges and universities for sciences?

    i dont think they should be banned, but anytime a transcript pops up showing the student attended a religious based school, it should throw up red flags and they should be tested more strictly.
     
  2. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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  3. dinaluvsApple thread starter macrumors regular

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    #3
    [​IMG]
     
  4. appleguy123 macrumors 603

    appleguy123

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    #4
    Because a lot of religious schools wouldn't teach science "correctly"(meaning according to the ways that science currently accepts in issues such as the creation and age of the earth and natural selection).
     
  5. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #5
    Then they would fail their classes. I don't see what has to change in the admissions process. Discriminating based on one's religious viewpoint seems rather uncivilized.
     
  6. MattSepeta macrumors 65816

    MattSepeta

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    #6
    lol

    what an unbelievable question.

    what if their parents made them go to a catholic school?
     
  7. dinaluvsApple thread starter macrumors regular

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    #7
    which is why there are 3 options on the poll.
     
  8. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #8
    Screwed up and voted for the wrong one. I Meant to say yes.

    It should have nothing to do with what they are allowed in providing there HS is accredited. Hell my degree is science based degree and lets see in the entire degree exact 0% has anything to do with religion, evolution or creationism. My degree has Chemistry, physics and mathematics in its background. It does not touch biology at all.

    This is just a pointless bashing thread. Hell very little of HS education has anything to with a science degree and most of it is learned in college any how. HS at most scratches the surface of those degrees and you are not missing much if you are missing anything from HS. Hell most of it is reviewed in class any how.

    Typical bashing thread.
     
  9. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #9
    I'm not sure how much it matters, though... I mean, when I was at Michigan, there were these guys who would go on and on about how they "did relativity" in high school, but now they were in second year physics and they couldn't solve basic classical electrodynamics problems. Broadly, studies have supported the idea that basic aptitude measures (like what the SAT measures) do well at predicting who will finish college. There's plenty of time to learn plenty of science during four years of undergraduate education, and foundational underpinnings like mathematics and reading comprehension are going to be more easily assessable from a combination of standardized test results and academic records.

    I would honestly be more concerned about home schooled individuals than people who attended religious institutions, but overall, the data doesn't really compellingly show a case for worrying about either.
     
  10. dinaluvsApple thread starter macrumors regular

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    #10

    homeschooling should be categorized under child abuse.
     
  11. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #11
    ^^^that's pretty unhelpful. Homeschooling isn't necessarily a bad thing^^^

    Of course they should be able to if they meet the criteria. Not only that they should be encouraged to if that's what they want to do. The absolute worst thing would be to stay with confines of the religious echo chamber. Exposure to secular views is far more important for a scientist.
     
  12. Mugambo macrumors 6502

    Mugambo

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    #12
    Food for thought: about 95% of scientists are atheists.
     
  13. MattSepeta macrumors 65816

    MattSepeta

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    #13
    How intelligent of you.
    What do these people have in common?

    George Washington
    Thomas Jefferson
    James Madison
    John Quincy Adams
    Abraham Lincoln
    William Henry Harrison
    Theodore F. Roosevelt
    Booker T. Washington
    Thomas Edison
    Benjamin Franklin
    Andrew Carnegie
    John Stuart Mill
    Mark Twain
    George Bernard Shaw
    Irving Berlin
    Charles Dickens
    C.S. Lewis
    Robert E. Lee
    Douglas MacArthur
    George Patton
    Rembrandt Peale
    Claude Money
    Ansel Adams
     
  14. catfish743 macrumors 6502

    catfish743

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    #14

    I would agree some private schools may not do things that go with scientific standards. Public schools also do this, however. I think it will come out how well they pass "standard tests" Though when I took the SAT I don't think there was a science section and the ACT science section was more just looking at charts.

    Personally, I don't think one should discriminate based on religion, even if it goes against science. Ultimately the individual makes the decisions about what they believe, community influenced or not. But the scientific method calls for testing and retesting of hypothesis, theirs and ours.

    Of course, I have a hard time believing in right and wrong, correct and incorrect.

    "If you're not getting answers ask better questions." - Cartel
     
  15. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #15
    So perhaps we should give some of the religious an opportunity to join the scientists, no?
     
  16. catfish743 macrumors 6502

    catfish743

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    #16
    I have several friends who were HS'd and they are perfectly fine. Some believe one thing, others the next. One in particular isn't a complete new-earth-ist, from what I can gather, but he believed god created the earth and what not. That's his choice, partially because he was taught that but he has all the same power to question that as the rest of us do. We disagree on some issues but he is a great friend and a great person.
     
  17. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #17
    I'm not overly against it... I just see (in the context of doing evals that include assessing the academic performance of kids... but I don't do that as much now in my current job as I used to) too many cases where homeschooling is done by parents who (a) are not very bright and (b) teach to minimal required standards. I have concerns about social development, too, although some homeschoolers do a very nice job of integrating into homeschool enclaves or traditional school extracurriculars that provide that aspect of schooling.

    But mostly, what I meant, was that if the core concern is that the education may or may not provide the right academic groundwork for university, then home schooling is probably the least standardized from place to place and person to person in comparison to moving from school to school in the public, private, charter, or religious spheres....

    But I also think this conversation is absurd, and I don't know why I replied to this thread. :eek:
     
  18. Mugambo macrumors 6502

    Mugambo

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    #18
    It starts right at the foundation.
    For example, a child who's been bombarded not to believe in evolution.
    How can one expect him/her to become an anthropologist?
     
  19. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #19
    He can change his mind. Many do. No one has the right to deny someone who is capable.
     
  20. MattSepeta macrumors 65816

    MattSepeta

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    #20
    By giving the child more credit than that, for one.
     
  21. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

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    #21
    Not sure what this poll is meant to find out. I went to a Catholic school in Ireland between 1977-1984 and we were taught about evolution as science. The "Creation" myth was treated as a metaphor in RE.

    The Catholic church has accepted evolution:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church_and_evolution#Catholic_schools_and_evolution

    Not that I want or need to defend the Catholic church, which has plenty of flaws, but at least show some knowledge of the facts.
     
  22. barkomatic macrumors 68040

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    #22
    If they do well in their classes I don't see what the problem is. The fact that this question is even asked kinda shows a strong intolerance on your part.

    Many religious schools do not teach in a way that would contradict scientific principles -- believe it or not.
     
  23. Mugambo macrumors 6502

    Mugambo

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    #23
    We're underestimating how deep rooted a religion and its value goes onto shaping the future of an individual!
     
  24. catfish743 macrumors 6502

    catfish743

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    #24

    I was once a devout Methodist from a small town in Eastern Ky. People change.
     
  25. Mugambo macrumors 6502

    Mugambo

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    #25
    For the billions of devotees, even millions changing is a drop in an pool. Exceptions are always there. Don't get me wrong. But the very fact about scientist community speaks for itself.
     

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