Should speed limits be increased?

Should the speed limit be increased?

  • Yes

    Votes: 50 62.5%
  • No

    Votes: 30 37.5%

  • Total voters
    80

G51989

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Feb 25, 2012
2,506
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/22/stateline-speed-limit/2575047/

Gentlemen, ladies and kids with driver's licenses: Start your engines. Five state legislatures voted this year to raise speed limits on some divided highways in their states.

They're following the lead of Texas, which last year bumped the speed limit on one stretch to 85 mph, the highest in the nation.

Ohio and Utah are going full speed ahead with implementing their higher limits. Maine and Illinois officials are studying when — and whether — to raise their newly approved speeds, while New Hampshire's new law takes effect in January.

Some 36 states have speed limits of 70 mph or above on some roads, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Texas set its 85 mph limit on a 40-mile stretch of divided toll highway between Austin and San Antonio (toll: $6.17, one-way).

Speed limits traditionally were regulated by individual states until the mid-1970s when Congress, to conserve energy, designated a national speed limit of 55 mph and threatened to withhold highway funds from any state that exceeded it. But those rules were loosened in 1987 and repealed in 1995.

Since then, states have steadily increased the speed limits on some stretches of roads. Generally, the higher speed limits are set on rural interstate highways or other limited-access roads, though not always.

Utah's new law expands segments of a road already posted at 80 mph, effective last March. Ohio's law, signed by Gov. John Kasich, increased the maximum speed limit from 65 mph to 70 mph on rural interstates, effective July 13.

Further study

The Maine Department of Transportation is studying the issue, after getting the green light to raise speed limits up to 75 mph on interstate highways by the legislature and governor. The department won't make a decision on whether to raise the limit until after Oct. 10 (the statute prohibits implementation before then). A spokesman for the state transportation department said the decision could go either way.

"The bill in the legislature did give the commissioner (David Bernhardt) the purview to raise the limits," Ted Talbot said. "If he saw fit, he could conduct the traffic study, and upon the results of that, he would decide if it's prudent."

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn is considering whether to sign a bill that would raise the limit on some interstates from 65 mph to 70 mph. The urban and suburban counties in the Chicago and St. Louis areas — Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, Madison, McHenry, St. Clair and Will — would have the option of setting lower limits if the governor agrees to the statewide increase. The legislature overwhelmingly approved the speed limit increase.

Quinn spokesman David Blanchette said the governor has heard from those who are for and against the speed limit increase. The secretary of transportation and the state police oppose it, and businesses and other transportation groups are for it. "He is weighing the feelings of both sides and will make a decision based on his own personal feelings and the input" by mid-August, Blanchette said.

If Quinn agrees, it will take effect Jan. 1.

New Hampshire's legislature and governor raised the maximum speed limit from 65 mph to 70 mph on specified stretches of roads, effective in January.

On the flip side of the issue, the North Carolina House rejected a state Senate-approved bill that would have hiked the speed on some roads to 75 mph.

More car crashes?

Not everyone is happy with the trend toward higher speeds. Critics point to the dangers.

"When speed limits go up deaths go up, and when speed limits go down deaths go down," said Russ Rader, spokesman for the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety . "It seems as though more states are raising speed limits despite the clear evidence that shows what the safety downside is. Higher speeds mean more crashes and more severe ones."

Speed was a contributing factor in about 30 percent of fatal traffic accidents in 2011 (the last year for which statistics are available), according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. That statistic has stayed about the same for a decade, even as speed limits have increased and safety equipment has improved.

Utah did its own research. The Utah Department of Transportation conducted a study beginning in 2008 on a stretch of I-15 where the speed limit was 75 mph. The study found a 20 percent drop in the number of people exceeding the posted speed limit, according to Robert Hull, director of traffic and safety with the Utah DOT. In addition, data from the test area through 2012 found there was an 11 percent to 20 percent reduction in speed-related crashes, depending on which stretch of road was being evaluated.

The study also found that the actual speed maintained by drivers on that stretch was about 82 to 84 mph, whether the posted speed limit was 75 mph or 80 mph.

"People are driving at the speed at which they feel comfortable, and they are doing it safely and prudently," he said.

As the Illinois votes show, raising speed limits is a popular issue for state lawmakers. Ohio state Rep. Ross McGregor, a Republican who sponsored his state's speed limit hike bill, said the law allows the state to keep up with neighboring jurisdictions, which already allow faster speeds.

"When discussing this with my colleagues, we found this is just the reality of what people are driving today," he told Stateline. "I know we have heard from constituents who were very pleased," he said, though he acknowledged some detractors.

State police officials were neutral on the issue, he said, which made it easier for the legislature to support it.

Other states' speed limits also played a role in New Hampshire's decision to up the speed on rural Interstate 93 north of Concord to the Canadian border (with the exception of mountainous Franconia Notch) from 65 mph to 70 mph. Part of the reasoning was that neighboring Maine already has the higher limit on some rural highways.

"The limited nature of the 5 miles-per-hour speed limit increase in a targeted region of the state, along with the overwhelming, bipartisan support for the measure, makes me comfortable with signing this measure into law, bringing the speed limit more in line with the habits of our rural travelers," Democratic Gov. Maggie Hassan said in a statement. "For their safety and the safety of others, I encourage all motorists to use the common sense that Granite Staters are known for and respect the new speed limit."

Should speed limits be increased?

I think yes. This is not 1977 anymore.

The average modern car is easily capable of going 90-100mph with no mechanical difficulty.

People already drive 80-95 anyway on most interstates and highways.

So why not just increase the speed limit?

I would support it, I am sick of people in slow eco cars clogging up the the left lane. Go 75, or get out.

Germany seems to have massive success with very high suggested speed limits and in some cases no speed limits at all.

Why can't we?

Who actually drives 65?

Boring people.

And who actually pulls people over doing 70?

Cops looking for a payday, it has nothing to do with safety.
 
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Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
I have no problem with the current speed limits. If you really need to go that much faster, leave earlier. What we really need is for law enforcement to crack down on those that violate the speed laws. That money could be used to improve the roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

When I was younger, I may have broken a few speed laws. Then I grew up.
 

G51989

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Feb 25, 2012
2,506
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
I have no problem with the current speed limits. If you really need to go that much faster, leave earlier.QUOTE]

But its been proven in countries all over the world, and in several states in America that a 65MPH speed limit is to slow.


What we really need is for law enforcement to crack down on those that violate the speed laws. That money could be used to improve the roads, bridges and other infrastructure.
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

No it won't. it goes into department pockets, It will go nowhere near a bridge.



When I was younger, I may have broken a few speed laws. Then I grew up.
You bought a slow car. Get out of my way.

Try to pull over the several million cars going into NYC on a weekday doing 90-100mph. You won't pull it off.


Maybe down in Georgia, you guys are afraid of 70mph, but up here, people go near 100MPH near NYC all the time.

Guess what?

The local cops couldn't care less.

They have real crime to fight..

I have a feeling the NYPD and New York State Troopers care more about hard drugs, rape, murder, and human trafficking than they do a speeder.
 
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LIVEFRMNYC

macrumors 604
Oct 27, 2009
7,433
8,605
Although I've heard stories of drivers getting ticket for going only about 5mph over the limit, most and myself never experienced that. Most speed tickets are for obviously speeding way above the limit.

Being that said ...... I would have probably said no, but here in NY they are in the process of putting speed cameras all over. And to add on to that, I think the just lowered the speed limit on non highway roads to 25mph. In Manhattan I can understand that. But for the outer boroughs, that's ridiculous. Go only 25mph in Queens or Bklyn, and you'll probably get hit from behind and soft drinks thrown at your car.
 

FreemanW

macrumors 6502
Sep 10, 2012
472
87
The Real Northern California
Increasing the speed limits may provide a small modicum of relief with regard to the over-population issue confronting the planet.

Bringing back Drivers Education in High Schools together with accessible Family Planning, readily available contraception and sex education would all provide for a more pleasing experience in society, far more than faster highway speeds.
 

Renzatic

Suspended
Maybe down in Georgia, you guys are afraid of 70mph, but up here, people go near 100MPH near NYC all the time.
Pfft. I'm not. While I'm hardly a reckless driver, I almost always seem to go 10 miles over the limit no matter where I'm at. It's not something I do to buck trends or be a rebel, it just seems that every road is marked 10 miles below what I consider a comfortable speed.

On the open interstate, I'm going at least 85, and usually keeping up with everyone else on the road.
 

Merkava_4

macrumors 6502a
Sep 4, 2010
557
49
California
I think we need some basic vehicle safety inspections before raising the speed limit. I recently did some suspension work on my car. I'm amazed at how much more stable the car is at speed with some simple replacement parts. All I did was replace two lower control arms w/ ball joints (because the bushings were worn out and they're not available separately) and two stabilizer bar outer link kits. After the work I got the car aligned. It's amazing how much more sure-er the car feels at all speeds. So a safety inspection that involves checking the suspension, steering, brakes, and tires would go a long ways towards improving safety for people traveling on highways and rural roads.
 

Bug-Creator

macrumors 6502a
May 30, 2011
550
2,129
Germany
They're following the lead of Texas, which last year bumped the speed limit on one stretch to 85 mph, the highest in the nation.
Slow.....

Try to pull over the several million cars going into NYC on a weekday doing 90-100mph.
Still slooooooooooooooow :p

(mind you, my current car won't do more than 115mph anyways)

In order to pull that of safely you'll need:
- cars maintained to a certain level
- drivers capable to use their brain
- roads in proper repair
- traffic rules that wor at those speeds (use of lanes etc)


Just a little tidbit:
If your involved in an accident while driving over 80mph (130kmh) on an autobahn your allways assigned partial blame, no matter what.
 

TechGod

macrumors 68040
Feb 25, 2014
3,163
840
New Zealand
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/22/stateline-speed-limit/2575047/




Should speed limits be increased?

I think yes. This is not 1977 anymore.

The average modern car is easily capable of going 90-100mph with no mechanical difficulty.

People already drive 80-95 anyway on most interstates and highways.

So why not just increase the speed limit?

I would support it, I am sick of people in slow eco cars clogging up the the left lane. Go 75, or get out.

Germany seems to have massive success with very high suggested speed limits and in some cases no speed limits at all.

Why can't we?

Who actually drives 65?

Boring people.

And who actually pulls people over doing 70?

Cops looking for a payday, it has nothing to do with safety.
Your thought process really scares me. Me personally seeing accidents happen due to morons going over the limit reinforces that idea.

How the hell can't you be scared by going that fast? It's not even about "skill" any longer, you might be able to handle the car but what about the other driver? There was recently a big thing about how foreigners were the cause for nearly 600 car accidents here and these people probably thought the same as you. Of course I'm not saying speeding is the only reason for the crashes but it is an important factor as well.


Source- http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11269335
 

bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
4,006
11,823
I have no problem with the current speed limits. If you really need to go that much faster, leave earlier.
But its been proven in countries all over the world, and in several states in America that a 65MPH speed limit is to slow.

I actually disagree with this.

From my time in Australia, which while it was 20 years ago, still holds true today:

Wikipedia said:
Australian states and territories use two "default" speed limits. These apply automatically in the absence of 'posted' speed restriction signage. The two default speed limits are:
  • within built-up areas, 50 kilometres per hour (31 mph), except for the Northern Territory which remains at 60 kilometres per hour (37 mph)
  • outside built-up areas, 100 kilometres per hour (62 mph); two exceptions are Western Australia and the Northern Territory at 110 kilometres per hour (68 mph)
So like Montana, they have basically two areas where the speed limit exceeds 80mph, both of those in the Northern Territory.

On my drives down Princes highway from Sydney to Melbourne to Geelong to Warrnambool, speed limit was always 100km/h.

It's even more drilled into their heads from the PSAs they have there (and their PSAs are brutally honest; they don't hold back/pull punches): Speed kills.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/video-anti-speeding-ad-new-zealand-2997189

This is an PSA that I saw on TV every day down there. Before seeing it, I was foolish and Risky, and sped when I could. After seeing it, never again.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIU7R15Vi5I

BL.
 

VI™

macrumors 6502a
Aug 27, 2010
636
1
Shepherdsturd, WV
Anyone remember when Montana didn't have a speed limit in some places?

I have no problem with the current speed limits. If you really need to go that much faster, leave earlier. What we really need is for law enforcement to crack down on those that violate the speed laws. That money could be used to improve the roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

When I was younger, I may have broken a few speed laws. Then I grew up.
I believe that the current speed limits could be bumped up, but even more so, new laws need to be introduced or current laws need to be enforced on how people currently drive. What's dangerous are those people that get out there and hog the left lane, creating bottlenecks. When you're trapped in a pack of vehicles, the situation becomes even more than if you were on a more open, freer flowing roadway. You have people that get in to the left lane and creep by where it can take over a minute to pass another vehicle or they sit there and pace a car in the right lane for five miles. This also happens with big trucks and these people often are not even doing the speed limit. It very rare that I'll see someone move in to the left lane, pass, then move back over. Half the time, they pass and then sit in the left lane.

When I had a faster motorcycle, I would often flash my high beams at people sitting in the left hand lane because all they're doing is blocking traffic. People need to pay more attention to their driving, but unfortunately most people don't.

I think a more rigorous licensing process like they have in Europe would help to get rid of some of the garbage out there on the roads.
 

Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
Anyone remember when Montana didn't have a speed limit in some places?

I believe that the current speed limits could be bumped up, but even more so, new laws need to be introduced or current laws need to be enforced on how people currently drive. What's dangerous are those people that get out there and hog the left lane, creating bottlenecks. When you're trapped in a pack of vehicles, the situation becomes even more than if you were on a more open, freer flowing roadway. You have people that get in to the left lane and creep by where it can take over a minute to pass another vehicle or they sit there and pace a car in the right lane for five miles. This also happens with big trucks and these people often are not even doing the speed limit. It very rare that I'll see someone move in to the left lane, pass, then move back over. Half the time, they pass and then sit in the left lane.

When I had a faster motorcycle, I would often flash my high beams at people sitting in the left hand lane because all they're doing is blocking traffic. People need to pay more attention to their driving, but unfortunately most people don't.

I think a more rigorous licensing process like they have in Europe would help to get rid of some of the garbage out there on the roads.
One weekend, a group of bikers closed on us from behind. They flashed their lights, rode right up on the rear bumper of the Tahoe that I was a passenger in. The speed limit was 70 mph and we were doing around 80 mph. After a couple minutes, the bikers decided to pass us on both the left and right. They swarmed around us... They opened those bikes up.

Suddenly, we saw all of them drop anchor. Brake lights came on, they all moved to the right and slowed down to speed limit. They realized that they had just ridden into a column of about 15 law enforcement vehicles on the way to some training. No blue lights came on but everyone had a good laugh about it later. Well, maybe not the bikers.
 

mr99

macrumors 6502a
Jan 8, 2014
520
44
One weekend, a group of bikers closed on us from behind. They flashed their lights, rode right up on the rear bumper of the Tahoe that I was a passenger in. The speed limit was 70 mph and we were doing around 80 mph. After a couple minutes, the bikers decided to pass us on both the left and right. They swarmed around us... They opened those bikes up.



Suddenly, we saw all of them drop anchor. Brake lights came on, they all moved to the right and slowed down to speed limit. They realized that they had just ridden into a column of about 15 law enforcement vehicles on the way to some training. No blue lights came on but everyone had a good laugh about it later. Well, maybe not the bikers.

I see this far too often
 

VI™

macrumors 6502a
Aug 27, 2010
636
1
Shepherdsturd, WV
One weekend, a group of bikers closed on us from behind. They flashed their lights, rode right up on the rear bumper of the Tahoe that I was a passenger in. The speed limit was 70 mph and we were doing around 80 mph. After a couple minutes, the bikers decided to pass us on both the left and right. They swarmed around us... They opened those bikes up.

Suddenly, we saw all of them drop anchor. Brake lights came on, they all moved to the right and slowed down to speed limit. They realized that they had just ridden into a column of about 15 law enforcement vehicles on the way to some training. No blue lights came on but everyone had a good laugh about it later. Well, maybe not the bikers.
I would give people a chance to get over, but if you're blatantly riding in the left lane when you had the opportunity to already get over or have kept pace with the car in the next lane over, then I'll make my way around.
 

mr99

macrumors 6502a
Jan 8, 2014
520
44
VI[emoji769 said:
;19340583]I would give people a chance to get over, but if you're blatantly riding in the left lane when you had the opportunity to already get over or have kept pace with the car in the next lane over, then I'll make my way around.

I do the same and feel that's fair. But it's annoying.
 

quagmire

macrumors 603
Apr 19, 2004
6,255
1,063
Your thought process really scares me. Me personally seeing accidents happen due to morons going over the limit reinforces that idea.
Or the accidents are caused by the morons going below the speed of traffic. If everyone is speeding going 80 MPH lets say in a 65 MPH zone, the few actually going the speed limit are the dangerous ones on the roads (especially since no one follows the rules of the road so those 65 MPH people are in the left lane).

The US highway system was designed to handle faster speeds. It was only during the oil crisis were the limits lowered to 55 MPH in an attempt to reduce gas consumption. So theoretically, the limits can be raised without causing a safety hazard in respect to the road system being able to handle it.

But as you pointed out, drivers tend to suck. The US drivers ed sucks. I didn't have to prove to the DMV I could handle a car at speed. All I had to do was parallel park, K Turn, backup, and stop at a stop sign to get my license. All slow maneuvers.
 

VI™

macrumors 6502a
Aug 27, 2010
636
1
Shepherdsturd, WV
Or the accidents are caused by the morons going below the speed of traffic. If everyone is speeding going 80 MPH lets say in a 65 MPH zone, the few actually going the speed limit are the dangerous ones on the roads (especially since no one follows the rules of the road so those 65 MPH people are in the left lane).

The US highway system was designed to handle faster speeds. It was only during the oil crisis were the limits lowered to 55 MPH in an attempt to reduce gas consumption. So theoretically, the limits can be raised without causing a safety hazard in respect to the road system being able to handle it.

But as you pointed out, drivers tend to suck. The US drivers ed sucks. I didn't have to prove to the DMV I could handle a car at speed. All I had to do was parallel park, K Turn, backup, and stop at a stop sign to get my license. All slow maneuvers.
When I got my license, Drivers Ed wasn't required in WV and there were no real restrictions placed on new drivers via the state, that was a parental thing. I guess I took my test on a day when the trooper doing it didn't want to be bothered because I had to leave the DMV parking lot, drive about 1/2 mile down the road where the limit was 35mph, turn around, and return to the DMV parking lot to parallel park in a spot they set up that was enormous. I proved practically nothing.

Fortunately with my love of cars and driving, I've learned to be a better driver. Starting with video games and learning about driving dynamics, then learning to ride a motorcycle (probably what everyone should be required to do), then doing auto X days and track days, have really taught me about driving and how to handle a vehicle. If I'm ever in a situation where I have to make emergency manuevers, I don't freak out and slam on the brakes or swerve when I'm not supposed to.

Unfortunately, this sort of interested doesn't translate to most drivers, and it's not even all about learning to drive fast, but just being aware. I take a slightly curvy backroad to work and one morning I counted a driver in front of me on or over the yellow line 22 times. They also ran both stop signs. The thing is, this isn't the exception around here, but the norm. Most driver can't take a left hand turn without at least riding on the yellow line if not crossing it and I rarle ever see anyone stop at a stop sign. There's been many times that I've been almost hit because I've stopped at a four way and proceed to try and go when someone approaching from a different direction just slows down a little before trying to accelerate through without actually stopping.
 

impulse462

macrumors 68000
Jun 3, 2009
1,697
2,203
I have no problem with the current speed limits. If you really need to go that much faster, leave earlier.QUOTE]

But its been proven in countries all over the world, and in several states in America that a 65MPH speed limit is to slow.




HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

No it won't. it goes into department pockets, It will go nowhere near a bridge.





You bought a slow car. Get out of my way.

Try to pull over the several million cars going into NYC on a weekday doing 90-100mph. You won't pull it off.


Maybe down in Georgia, you guys are afraid of 70mph, but up here, people go near 100MPH near NYC all the time.

Guess what?

The local cops couldn't care less.

They have real crime to fight..

I have a feeling the NYPD and New York State Troopers care more about hard drugs, rape, murder, and human trafficking than they do a speeder.
I'd agree with a small bump, but majority of these reasons you gave actually don't address why it would be a good thing.
 

Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
I took Driver's Education in school but it was really just a formality to fill the requirement. I had got my license two years prior. I didn't really have formal training and I didn't take an actual driving test. Years ago, when I was young, I lived on a farm. We drove tractors from the time our feet could touch the pedals. As we got older, we'd drive trucks on the farm. I remember my grandfather giving us boys a couple lessons but it was mostly to teach us how to shift the "three on the tree".

The day I turned fourteen, my grandfather and I were handling some errands. We stopped at the DMV. I went in to get my farm license, which you could get at 14 back then. I took the written test, which was actually a written test back then and was ready for the driving part. It just started to rain slightly. The conversation between my grandfather and the DMV lady went sort of like this…

"Wolf, I can't give a test in the rain." - DMV Lady.

"Well Debby, what kind of license are you going to give this boy that he can't drive in the rain." - my grandfather.

"No, we can't give a test in the rain." - DMV Lady.

"Now that is the strangest thing. He drove down here fine." - my grandfather

"Smile and look at the camera." - DMV Lady to me.

And I left there with a Farm License. We didn't look at driving as something fun to do, we looked it as just something you had to do as part of the day. One thing that I think farm driving really taught me well was backing up with a trailer. it seemed that we used to haul trailers everywhere we went.

One more humorous story from childhood farm driving. One night, I'm driving. I had a friend with me and we both had dates. A state trooper pulled me over. He had me get out of the car and he's telling me about the stop sign that I didn't quite stop at. He looks at my farm only license, looks in the car… With perfect timing, he said, "Let me guess, milk maids?".
 

TechGod

macrumors 68040
Feb 25, 2014
3,163
840
New Zealand
Or the accidents are caused by the morons going below the speed of traffic. If everyone is speeding going 80 MPH lets say in a 65 MPH zone, the few actually going the speed limit are the dangerous ones on the roads (especially since no one follows the rules of the road so those 65 MPH people are in the left lane).

The US highway system was designed to handle faster speeds. It was only during the oil crisis were the limits lowered to 55 MPH in an attempt to reduce gas consumption. So theoretically, the limits can be raised without causing a safety hazard in respect to the road system being able to handle it.

But as you pointed out, drivers tend to suck. The US drivers ed sucks. I didn't have to prove to the DMV I could handle a car at speed. All I had to do was parallel park, K Turn, backup, and stop at a stop sign to get my license. All slow maneuvers.
Your thought process also scares me. So if everyone is speeding its ok? That's extremely ignorant of you regarding how many lives are lost due to speeders. As the report shows it's due to that mind set that kills people in my country and I don't like that one bit.
 

yg17

macrumors G5
Aug 1, 2004
14,888
2,480
St. Louis, MO
I'd love to see the speed limits increased, but not without some changes first:

1) Strict enforcement of slow poke laws. The asshat going 60 MPH in the left lane is going to be even more of a danger to others if the speed limit is 80.

2) Strict enforcement of cell phone laws. The asshat texting and driving is going to be even more of a danger to others at 80 instead of 60. Require handsfree, give expensive tickets and license points when people violate. Same punishment for texting and driving as DUI, because I think they both can be equally as dangerous.

3) Require stringent safety inspections. I see a lot of old jalopys on the road that I'm shocked aren't falling apart and look unsafe at 60, much less 80. Missouri has safety inspections, so I guess some how these cars are slipping through (or on expired plates), but as I understand it, some states don't even have a safety inspection. Driving a car with expired plates because of a failed inspection should come with a hefty ticket and points on your license, maybe the threat of insurance rate increases and eventual suspension will get people to make their cars safe.

That would take care of driver safety issues with a higher speed limit - then there's other road safety issues. Our road infrastructure is terrible, there would need to be huge efforts to repair roads and bridges and maintain them. There's a reason Germany can have stretches of highways without speed limits - half of the population and one of the major political parties doesn't bitch and moan about government waste when money is spent to repave a road or repair a bridge.

----------

Your thought process also scares me. So if everyone is speeding its ok? That's extremely ignorant of you regarding how many lives are lost due to speeders. As the report shows it's due to that mind set that kills people in my country and I don't like that one bit.
Speed kills is one of the biggest myths of them all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BKdbxX1pDw
 

vrDrew

macrumors 65816
Jan 31, 2010
1,317
11,832
Midlife, Midwest
I think you can make a reasonable case for raising the speed limit on some rural Interstate highways by 5-10 mph. But in 2014 America, raising limits to speeds any higher than that is a recipe for disaster.

In very simple terms, America's drivers, cars, and highways are simply not up to the task of maintaining speeds found on German Autobahnen.

Lets start with the obvious: Many US States do not require periodic mechanical inspections of automobiles in the way that most European nations do. I frequently see cars with bald tires, obviously worn brakes and damaged suspensions - faults that would fail any MOT Inspection. The current US private automobile fleet is an average almost 11 years suggesting many, many vehicles would be unable of maintaining prolonged high-speed operation.

Then there are drivers: US drivers are obviously not familiar with the concept of keeping the left lane clear for faster traffic. The standard for driver instruction and passing drivers' licensing is much, much lower here than it is in most parts of Europe.

Lastly, much of our Interstate Highway system is currently in such a poor state of repair as to make speeds greater than ~ 70 mph uncomfortable, if not highly dangerous. I've actually seen "rough road" signage on sections of I43 in Wisconsin, near where I live. And I suspect the same is true in many other places.

I wish it were possible to raise speed limits on our Interstate system. But absent some major changes in our motor vehicle system - I don't see it happening anytime soon.
 

G51989

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Feb 25, 2012
2,506
10
NYC NY/Pittsburgh PA
Your thought process also scares me. So if everyone is speeding its ok? That's extremely ignorant of you regarding how many lives are lost due to speeders. As the report shows it's due to that mind set that kills people in my country and I don't like that one bit.
I never have been to your country.

But here, most people speed.

I think the best example of this outside NYC that I've seen personally was Birmingham Alabama, I was driving right past the city doing about 105, and there people flying past me ;)

Commuting to NYC as I do from time to time, speeds of 80-95mph are not uncommon.
 

satcomer

macrumors 603
Feb 19, 2008
6,290
928
The Finger Lakes Region
Although I've heard stories of drivers getting ticket for going only about 5mph over the limit, most and myself never experienced that. Most speed tickets are for obviously speeding way above the limit.
I got one in Northern Virginia (for doing 37MPH on a down hill slope) in a 35MPH zone after 3 miles of a 40MPH zone. The county cops were pulling everyone over. My fine was $30 so it wasn't worth to take time off work to fight it.

About a month later the county council changed the speed trap to 40 MPH in that section until a light about 50 feet ahead. Then after the light it was down to 30MPH. The county people were upset their family members were caught up in that speed trap, go figure.
 
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