Silk Road founder gets life w/o parole

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by haxrnick, May 29, 2015.

  1. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #1
    All I have to say is wow. Was facing a minimum 20 year sentence but the judge threw the book at him. Thoughts?

    http://www.wired.com/2015/05/silk-road-creator-ross-ulbricht-sentenced-life-prison/
     
  2. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #2
    Wow, I didn't think he would get life. While I believe he in the wrong for knowingly running a site that promoted the drug trade, I think life is a long time for someone so young. Kids make dumb mistakes. Obviously this person has created a lot of trouble with his project, but I believe most people deserve a second chance, at least at some point.
     
  3. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #3
    The US is a prison country, with 1% of the population permanently locked away ...
     
  4. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #4
    I suspect it was the solicitation of murder that did it. Makes it look a bit less like a kid making a dumb mistake, don't you think?
     
  5. haxrnick thread starter macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #5

    I didn't think those had anything to do with this case though. I could be wrong.
     
  6. jnpy!$4g3cwk macrumors 65816

    jnpy!$4g3cwk

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    #6
    TBH, I didn't pay attention, but, I do know that in the sentencing phase, they can bring up stuff like that, even if it wasn't part of the crime being charged.
     
  7. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #7
    He better hope the prison canteen takes Bitcoin.
     
  8. noodlemanc macrumors regular

    noodlemanc

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    #8
    Marketplaces like Silk Road take the drug trade off the streets and onto the Internet, which reduces violence that has historically been associated with the industry. Would you rather people were buying drugs online in a marketplace that is regulated by reputation or in alleyways where marketplace is "regulated" using guns and intimidation?
     
  9. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #9
    What you just wrote there is the reason why the US has 7 times more people in prison than any other nation on earth.

    Enjoy having your regime collect taxes from you to pay for this dudes housing, recreational activities, guards, food, sanitations, clothes, medical care and anything else he might do or need through the rest of his miserable life!

    Makes it look a bit less like a good decision, don't you think?
     
  10. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #10
    While I'm far from being an expert on law, I'm pretty sure advertising murder for hire on your illicit substances bartering website would land anyone in prison, regardless of country.
     
  11. noodlemanc macrumors regular

    noodlemanc

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    #12
    Sure, but most of the "murder for hire" listings on the deep web are scams anyway. It's silly to put a webmaster is prison because he operated a website where an anonymous 3rd party put up a listing *claiming* that he'd kill people for money.
     
  12. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #13
    This just confirms what very many people already think, US Justice is all about revenge.
     
  13. Thraun macrumors regular

    Thraun

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    #14
    I feel it is a little punitive, especially no chance at parole.

    There are certainly many, many people who have done much worse things and had a much lighter punishment.
     
  14. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #15
    I think he'll appeal and get a legitimate sentence.
     
  15. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #16
    Of course, but not to life without parole.

    ----------

    And in the mean time waste tax money and everyones time ...

    Who put a judge like that in charge of a case like this?
    The US appears to have no standards for law enforcement and judges.
     
  16. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #17
    Just because the selling part happens on the web, and far from your eyes, it doesn't mean the rest of the trade disappears. You're still left with addicts, and all the violence and harmful activities related to the rest of the trade (production, smuggling...). If anything, dealing on the internet makes it harder to control for the LE and easier to access for many more. I also doubt DPR had reducing violence in his mind when he created the website, or he would have limited trade to drugs and helped LEO for other more serious crimes.

    Of course, if the US really wanted to solve the drug problem, they would take other more significant steps (improve education, life prospects, etc.).
     
  17. noodlemanc macrumors regular

    noodlemanc

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    #18
    Sure, but online transactions are still preferable to street transactions. And most of the other violent parts of the drug trade, such as smuggling, dangerous production conditions and addicts committing other crime to fund their habits are caused by drugs being illegal in the first place. Trying to get rid of online drug marketplaces, which really is impossible because new ones replace the shut-down, does not change any of this.

    And if the U.S and other countries did want to solve the problem of drug addicts (as casual users aren't really a "problem") the law would treat drug addiction as a medical or mental issue rather than a crime. Because drug addicts are virtually never people who are mentally healthy in the first place, they are people trying escape something (such as childhood abuse, rape etc). Throwing traumatised people in prison that are attempting to escape from horrors that have happened to them is cruel and insane.

    Thankfully there is a trend now towards going easier on the end users and focusing on the wholesale suppliers instead, but this is still not going to work either because the suppliers are merely responding to the demand of those who want to self-medicate. To solve drug problems the root cause of why people are addicted to drugs must be addressed.
     
  18. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #19
    The US is not an actual person, but a political entity. It cannot want anything.

    What you are refering to are the rulers and the rulers are obviously not interested in solving any problems. Why would they be?
     
  19. nebo1ss macrumors 68030

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    #20
    Sentencing in the US has been F@@ked up for a very long time and it does not look like changing any time soon.
     
  20. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #21
    To put this in some context.

    1946 Albert Speer a top Nazi was given 20 years imprisonment.
     
  21. juanm, May 30, 2015
    Last edited: May 30, 2015

    juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #22
    Throwing victims in prison is indeed inhumane, but this guy was not a victim, he was profiting off it. Yes, many drugs should be legal, that would solve a lot of issues, in the same way that rendering alcohol illegal didn't help at all.

    Nobody can pretend solving an issue by attacking only once facet of it. Legalising drugs, treating addicts, and at the same time putting funds towards improving education and prevention instead of repression, would do much more than a war impossible to win against an ever-regenerating enemy.

    Now, let's grab a seat and wait for a responsible government with the will and the guts to change the policy.
     
  22. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #23
    Actually Speer was rather small potatoes. He was also one of the only Nazis who showed remorse and actually served his sentence! Most Nazis were immediately pardoned after the Nuremberg trials, some of them the worst of the worst, had their pensions restored and went on to have stellar careers.

    The nuremberg trials were a farce and ultimately almost nobody was held responsible.
    And J.J. Mccloy made damn sure that the US population stayed completely oblivious to this. I don't think that this is even mentioned in history class in the US.

    ----------

    It doesn't matter. You are missing the point.
     
  23. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #24
    But only if they were of use to the Allies (USA).:(

    But that's a thread for another time.;)
     
  24. noodlemanc macrumors regular

    noodlemanc

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    #25
    To be fair it is gradually but steadily changing. Many jurisdictions have decriminalised certain drugs for personal use, others have unofficially stopped going after end-users as hard as in the past, and of course some states in America have even fully legalised cannabis. We pretty much just have to keep calling people out who support the war on drugs to ensure that becomes more unpopular among the public.
     

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