SL 10.6.x Users How Are You Preventing Future Flashback Threats

Discussion in 'macOS' started by ixodes, Apr 30, 2012.

  1. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Pacific Coast, USA
    #1
    It seems that future flashback or other malware attacks are predicted.

    What are you doing to prepare for that?

    Obviously migrating to Lion is one choice since that's where Apple is placing its focus.

    But I want to stay with 10.6.8 and don't want to be forced into Leopard. I'm sure their are others like myself who prefer Snow Leopard.

    It appears Apples not going to support us, so we must find our own solutions.

    Your feedback is appreciated.
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 10 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). Also, Mac OS X Snow Leopard and Lion have anti-malware protection built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
    1. Make sure your built-in Mac firewall is enabled in System Preferences > Security > Firewall

    2. Uncheck "Open "safe" files after downloading" in Safari > Preferences > General

    3. Disable Java in your browser (Safari, Chrome, Firefox). This will protect you from malware that exploits Java in your browser, including the recent Flashback trojan. Leave Java disabled until you visit a trusted site that requires it, then re-enable only for the duration of your visit to that site. (This is not to be confused with JavaScript, which you should leave enabled.)

    4. Change your DNS servers to OpenDNS servers by reading this.

    5. Be careful to only install software from trusted, reputable sites. Never install pirated software. If you're not sure about an app, ask in this forum before installing.

    6. Never let someone else have access to install anything on your Mac.

    7. Don't open files that you receive from unknown or untrusted sources.

    8. For added security, make sure all network, email, financial and other important passwords are long and complex, including upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters.

    9. Always keep your Mac and application software updated. Use Software Update for your Mac software. For other software, it's safer to get updates from the developer's site or from the menu item "Check for updates", rather than installing from any notification window that pops up while you're surfing the web.
    That's all you need to do to keep your Mac completely free of any Mac OS X malware that has ever been released into the wild. You don't need any 3rd party software to keep your Mac secure.
     
  3. ixodes thread starter macrumors 601

    ixodes

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Pacific Coast, USA
    #3
    To GGJstudios, thanks for taking the time to confirm much of what I knew, and provide other suggestions I was unsure about.

    Frankly I'm completely satisfied with highly optimized 10.6.8, as opposed to trying, yet failing to get to that same level of confidence in Lion / Mountain Lion thus far.

    I want to stay with 10.6.8 until there's a true benefit to my work in upgrading to Apples latest at some point in the future.

    Conversely, am I being too concerned with the changes in Lion / Mountain Lion?

    That said, I would value your thoughts & opinions on which version of OS X you are using, and your planned upgrade path, reasons & timing, if you're so inclined.

    Thanks.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    There's no reason to upgrade to Lion or Mountain Lion unless they have some feature that you need or want that isn't being provided in Snow Leopard. Upgrading simply for the sake of upgrading is usually unnecessary. Many users are still running Leopard or Snow Leopard without any problems.

    I generally prefer to sit and wait when a new OS is released, until problems are discovered and resolved and until 3rd party apps can catch up with compatible versions. I haven't seen anything in Lion or Mountain Lion that I want or need. YMMV
     
  5. ixodes thread starter macrumors 601

    ixodes

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Pacific Coast, USA
    #5
    I'm on the same page with you when it comes to upgrading.

    Never one that must have the latest, just for the sake of it, I'm very happy with My current setup.

    Thanks again for your timely response, professional highly detailed answers, courtesy and helpfulness. I now have the peace of mind I've been seeking.

    Cheers ... :)
     

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