SMS in .Mac?

arn

macrumors god
Original poster
Staff member
Apr 9, 2001
14,499
1,783
Spymac reports that SMS may be a new feature coming to .Mac users.

Apple's implementation of SMS is centered around notification, not actual messaging. E-mail addresses can be flagged using .Mac's web mail, resulting in a notification on your cell phone each time a message is received from a flagged address.
 

sweetaction

macrumors regular
Oct 17, 2001
115
0
seattle, wa
Re: Damn

Originally posted by robotrenegade
Sounds pretty cool. I need a bluetooth phone now. Any one know if Verizon has or will be having one.
Verizon reps told me that V is waging success on coverage (analog, etc) instead of new technology. Kinda lame. Now if the FCC would require cell phone companies to transfer phone numbers, I would be gone. That number is printed everywhere!

I will probably go with ATT/Cingular when their merger is complete. GMS!
 

mum

macrumors newbie
Sep 16, 2002
21
0
Well, I guess they have interest in integrating cell phones into our "digital lifestyle", hence the iSync etc. They'd be absolute idiots to get into the crowded cell phone market IMHO.
 

Pants

macrumors regular
Aug 21, 2001
194
3
Originally posted by mum
Well, I guess they have interest in integrating cell phones into our "digital lifestyle", hence the iSync etc. They'd be absolute idiots to get into the crowded cell phone market IMHO.
indeed - and am i the only one not bothered by sms-ing emails to my phone? here in the uk, the ability to send sms form a computer has been severely curtailed by the phone companies. It has nothing to do with technology, more to do with greedy phone companies...besides, pop3 phones have been kicking around for a while - why pay for an sms telling you you have an email, when you can just pay to read the mail in the first instance? am i missing something?
 

BobVB

macrumors 6502a
Apr 12, 2002
781
86
Originally posted by mum
They'd be absolute idiots to get into the crowded cell phone market IMHO.
I've never understood this POV. If apple could make a cell phone in the quantities they want and sell every unit at a profit, why wouldn't they? What does the size of the market have to do with it if you are essentially putting out a niche product that has no real competition in its niche?

If Apple put out a color Palm OS PDA-Phone combo with bluetooth, at least 16 megs of RAM and 100% integrated into the Mac OS environment with USB or firewire connection for large data transfers I'd buy two! Heck, fuse it with an iPod and I'll buy three! ;) As it stands now, there isn't a phone on the market that does what I want AND integrates with the Mac. If Apple made one that was unique in the market they'd have no problem selling as many as they want to Maccies and maybe even PCers down the road no matter what the size of the cell phone market is.
 

Pants

macrumors regular
Aug 21, 2001
194
3
Originally posted by BobVB


I've never understood this POV. If apple could make a cell phone in the quantities they want and sell every unit at a profit, why wouldn't they? What does the size of the market have to do with it if you are essentially putting out a niche product that has no real competition in its niche?

If Apple put out a color Palm OS PDA-Phone combo with bluetooth, at least 16 megs of RAM and 100% integrated into the Mac OS environment with USB or firewire connection for large data transfers I'd buy two! Heck, fuse it with an iPod and I'll buy three! ;) As it stands now, there isn't a phone on the market that does what I want AND integrates with the Mac. If Apple made one that was unique in the market they'd have no problem selling as many as they want to Maccies and maybe even PCers down the road no matter what the size of the cell phone market is.
well, bearing in mind that macs make up what, 7% of the computer market, limiting the potential market in the first place...secondly, the phone market in europe is saturated, hence the current push to Multimedia messaging without a decent business model for charging users - on top of this, all the research suggests that phone buyers just arent prepared to pay 300 notes plus for a phone, when they can get one for free, less a few features. The phone companies just can't support the current model of subsidising phone prices via line rental, and are desperate to shift some of teh extra cost on games and other services. Wether these take off we will have to wait and see, but personally speaking, i havent seen anything that would really get me to shell out any more than I have too....

as a final line of evidence, if sony and erricsson are having trouble bringing the(excelent looking) p800 to market, what makes anyone think that apple could do anything better?
 

BobVB

macrumors 6502a
Apr 12, 2002
781
86
Originally posted by Pants
well, bearing in mind that macs make up what, 7% of the computer market, limiting the potential market in the first place.
No more than selling Macs or iPods did. If you only want to sell to 7% of the market and that's what you're geared for the relative size is largely irrelevant.

secondly, the phone market in europe is saturated,

I don't think Europe would be where they would be projecting the majority of their sales.

on top of this, all the research suggests that phone buyers just arent prepared to pay 300 notes plus for a phone, when they can get one for free, less a few features.

But we aren't talking typical buyers, we are talking Mac users, who by the very fact they bought a Mac indicate they aren't looking for the best deal, but the best feature set. Again, look at the iPod sales - it was far above the usual cost of an MP3 player but they sold just fine. Mac users will pay what they have to to get what they want.

as a final line of evidence, if sony and erricsson are having trouble bringing the(excelent looking) p800 to market, what makes anyone think that apple could do anything better?

I guess opinions vary but I just went and took a peek at the p800 and don't find it seductive at all. Regardless, they are trying to sell to a much bigger and, ahem, frugal market majority, not a smaller and proven more spendthrift niche market. They have to push many more units to make their profit against potential competitors. Apple will be pricing and projecting for a far smaller group that they will have a distinct marketing advantage with.

Personally I don't think they'd be taking more of a risk than they did with the iPod and look how well that turned out.

I just wish someone would put out a Palm OS PDA Bluetooth capable, iSync compatible phone with a decent amount of memory and good form factor sometime soon. I'm getting tired of waiting. :)
 

ibookin'

macrumors 65816
Jul 7, 2002
1,164
0
Los Angeles, CA
Originally posted by Pants

am i missing something?
You are. POP3 Phones are WAY less common in the U.S. than in Europe, mostly because the only plans that offer them are intented for business users and priced accordingly.

My view: I would love to have a simple SMS message appear on my cell phone telling me I have email on my .Mac account. If the entire email were to be sent to my phone, it would be hard to read on the phone's screen, and I could not download attachments. I'll stick with POP3 on the computer, SMS on the phone for now.

To the guy wanting to switch from Verizon to ATT/Cingular: Don't do it. Verizon has shown top-notch service all across the U.S. in cell phone coverage studies performed by Smart Business Magazine and others. This is because Verizon (and Sprint PCS) use a technology called CDMA, which has a greater installed user base in the U.S. than the competing system (used by ATT/Cingular/T-Mobile), GSM. GSM is MUCH better in Europe than in the U.S., so a GSM provider is a better choice if you live in Europe. However, CDMA was the first to achieve the holy grail of true 3G service. Japan's NTT DoCoMo, which many believe to be the best cell phone service in the world, uses CDMA. The bottom line: Don't switch. Once Verizon and Sprint get their act together on their high-speed networks (which already exist, by the way), your current service is going to look a lot better.
 

switchfiend

macrumors newbie
Jul 16, 2002
3
0
Northern Virginia
this was painful to read

Originally posted by ibookin'@mwny


You are. POP3 Phones are WAY less common in the U.S. than in Europe, mostly because the only plans that offer them are intented for business users and priced accordingly.

My view: I would love to have a simple SMS message appear on my cell phone telling me I have email on my .Mac account. If the entire email were to be sent to my phone, it would be hard to read on the phone's screen, and I could not download attachments. I'll stick with POP3 on the computer, SMS on the phone for now.

To the guy wanting to switch from Verizon to ATT/Cingular: Don't do it. Verizon has shown top-notch service all across the U.S. in cell phone coverage studies performed by Smart Business Magazine and others. This is because Verizon (and Sprint PCS) use a technology called CDMA, which has a greater installed user base in the U.S. than the competing system (used by ATT/Cingular/T-Mobile), GSM. GSM is MUCH better in Europe than in the U.S., so a GSM provider is a better choice if you live in Europe. However, CDMA was the first to achieve the holy grail of true 3G service. Japan's NTT DoCoMo, which many believe to be the best cell phone service in the world, uses CDMA. The bottom line: Don't switch. Once Verizon and Sprint get their act together on their high-speed networks (which already exist, by the way), your current service is going to look a lot better.
First of all, CDMA is not a 3rd generation wireless network. CDMA is a 2nd generation wireless network, akin to TDMA and GSM. The third generation equivilent to CDMA is called CDMA2000, and is currently being rolled out in Japan.

CDMA does in fact have a larger user base in the US then GSM, but that's pretty much it. CDMA is big in southeast asia, but it is very much the minority everywhere else.

The biggest reason for this is that CDMA was developed by Qualcomm and requires a steep license to use, wherease GSM was created by a mobile standards group and is free to utilize.

In the US, TDMA (what AT&T, and most of Cingular's network use) is still far and away the largest digital cellular technology. AT&T is upgrading their network to GSM, as it is a little more future proof then TDMA, which has pretty much run out of usefullness.

Each region is different, in regards to what "service" is best. I live in the mid-atlantic, and Verizon's service is abhorent from a network saturation standpoint. In California, Cingular probably has the best coverage area, as it was created from the old PacBell Wireless network.

The bottom line is that all of the cellular service providers are upgrading their networks currently, and within about 12 to 18 months, you should see a drastic increase in features offered.

You probably won't see good data plans though, as it isn't in the providers best interest to provide such services for their customers. That is the biggest hurdle to overcome for the proliferation of 3G wireless in the US (its not really necessary as it is, and most users won't pay for it).
 

Pants

macrumors regular
Aug 21, 2001
194
3
bob - i agree that europe is unlikely to be in the sights of any 'new' premium phone supplier, (hey, apple hardly knows where Europe is!;) ), but solely sticking to north america with phone sales is likely to further accelerate burnt fingers - europe is a massive market for phones. The phone market here is fashion driven, but since the tightening of screws due to the 3g fiasco, phone companies are becoming increasingly piccy about what phones they support and subsidise (although i keep finding to my cost that these subsidise keep getting smaller....grr...) - as for 3g, well, no one seems to want to pay for the 'features' - and who knows when if/it'll arrive... Meanwhile, only the rich and feckless are daft enough to want to send poor quality pics from their phones (an mms message is daftly priced at teh moment - and this is teh saviour of the phone companies? sheesh...)

Although the ipod was more expensive, it wasnt *much* more expensive than a similar specced generic music player - buying a phone without a (tied) network is hugely expensive - i suspect that any branded phone will rely on getting an existing manufacturer to rebadge one of theirs (the p800 has been touted as a possible 'apple' phone on the register), simply because it makes for a far smaller 'risk' to the networks.

anyone have any news of the new sony z700 ( i think?) I've noticed its been discontinued on a couple of european suppliers before its even been delivered? hopefully not, since I quite like my (kancekered!) z5
 

dongmin

macrumors 68000
Jan 3, 2002
1,708
0
Originally posted by ibookin'@mwny


You are. POP3 Phones are WAY less common in the U.S. than in Europe, mostly because the only plans that offer them are intented for business users and priced accordingly.

My view: I would love to have a simple SMS message appear on my cell phone telling me I have email on my .Mac account. If the entire email were to be sent to my phone, it would be hard to read on the phone's screen, and I could not download attachments. I'll stick with POP3 on the computer, SMS on the phone for now.
I get complete access to my Yahoo mail account through the web service on my Sprint phone. I have to say this is well worth the $5 I pay for the web service. It's so nice to check up on your messages when you're stuck in the airport or something. It'd be great if I could do this with my .Mac email account.
 

senjaz

macrumors newbie
Jun 10, 2002
13
0
Actually, not that useful...

I have a SonyEricsson T68i (had to get one after seeing the keynote). It has bluetooth, GPRS and an email client on it that supports IMAP4 as well as POP3.

GPRS is always connected, you can set it to check for mail however often you want, just like your Mac.

So I see my new .mac mail on my phone as I would on my powerbook and it's syncronised to boot.

Alot of the new phones now have these features. Some have been available for months, so it won't be long before they will be free with a network contract.