So in this new touch paradigm, are we seeing the final days of the mouse cursor?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Yr Blues, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. Yr Blues macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    #1
    Is a MacBook with no trackpad inevitable? No mouse cursor on the screen, even for desktop computers? I kind of hope so. I hate waking up to my mac alarm clock and spending a minute trying to find the cursor. ;)

    The only thing I see it being useful for is gaming, but even that's trending towards wii/natal-like technology.
     
  2. dmr727 macrumors G3

    dmr727

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    #2
    I hope not. Fingerprints on my display drive me nuts as it is.
     
  3. Yr Blues thread starter macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    #3
    unless there's newer technology, but that hasn't stopped people from buying iphones. I can see more elbow strain when you lift your hands from the keyboard.
     
  4. dmr727 macrumors G3

    dmr727

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    #4
    But the iPhone is different. The size requirement (mine spends 90% of its time in my pocket) allows pure touch to make sense. However my MBP doesn't need to be so small - in fact, I wouldn't want the screen to be any smaller. It's sitting on my lap right now, so the combination of the screen angled up over my keyboard and touchpad is perfect ergonomically. Since my arms are resting on the base while I type or use the mouse, I prefer this over having to reach up and touch the screen anyway.

    Maybe someday the keyboard and touchpad will be replaced with one big screen/touch surface to interact with the 'upper' screen, but at least at the moment, I don't see myself replacing my MBP or home computer with a pure tablet like device anytime soon.
     
  5. nick1516 macrumors 6502a

    nick1516

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    #5
    Yeah, because we all know how the wii turned out:rolleyes:
     
  6. dmr727 macrumors G3

    dmr727

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    #6
    And that's just it, the touch technology is great. Gestures are great. The way the Wii remotes interact with the content is very cool. But I don't see anything beneficial about performing the gesture directly on the content (like the iPhone) vs. performing the gesture on a device sitting below the screen where the content is shown (like my MBP). Both are just as intuitive and efficient. And with my MBP, my hands aren't covering the content, my wrists have something to rest on, and I'm not getting fingerprints all over my display. :)
     
  7. ejb190 macrumors 65816

    ejb190

    #7
    Well, let's take things to their logical conclusions.

    Take a notebook computer, eliminate the track pad and keyboard and set it up with two screens kind of like the Nintendo DS. Make the bottom screen that clicking, tactile screen that's on a few of the newer cell phones. Now use the bottom screen to display a keyboard, touchpad, or whatever input system is needed with the current application. At the same time, the whole "keyboard" could be multi-touch. It would sure take some getting used to, but I think it is within reach right now.

    The cursor is here to stay. The mouse, on the other hand...I would be happy to see new alternatives. I have been using trackballs for years because I haven't found a mouse that works well for me.
     
  8. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    #8
    Some people never take to trackballs. I just fail to see why it makes sense to use your whole arm to do what you can with your finger, or to click twice when you can set a button for that. We shall see what comes of multi-touch.
     
  9. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #9
    The mouse will never go away. It may be a companion to multi-touch but it will never be phase out completely.
     
  10. mattwolfmatt macrumors 65816

    mattwolfmatt

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    #10
    Whoa, never is a long time. Do you really think in 100 years there will be a mouse? Think how long we have come in the last 100 years. And remember, technology will continue to move FASTER than the future.

    I think the mouse's days are numbered. I'd give it 10 years before most people don't use it. 20 years and it will go the way of the floppy drive.
     
  11. BlackiBook macrumors 6502

    BlackiBook

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    Norman, Oklahoma
    #11
    I wish I still had a trackball... That thing was huge, but I loved it!!

    P.S - This is not my image, got it off google!
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    #12
    I can see the screens becoming touch screen but not to replace the keyboard and mouse. Mostly just to supplement them. I saw an HP like that at Best Buy a while ago and in the little I played with it the touch screen part was nice but when it got to fine tuning a mouse wins out every time. Touch the screen allowed for quicker access to something but still not a replacement for a mouse.
     
  13. samiwas macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    #13
    I draft in CAD a lot. I could not imagine using a touch interface for this, at least when getting down to details. I think there's just no way I could be as efficient with a touch interface as I can be with a multi-button mouse and keyboard shortcuts.

    Actually, any pixel-level style editing (like graphic design and such) I just don't think will ever be taken over by a solely touch-driven interface. I could easily be wrong, but I don't foresee that happening.

    I know that someone brought this up as a control option in my field (entertainment lighting production). Almost universally everyone replied with a "NO WAY". Touch screens are generally not responsive enough or quick enough with multiple quick hits to work in live production lighting. People who runs these consoles prefer very tactile feedback and the feel of buttons.
     

Share This Page