So what is the point of "time machine" backups if they can't be done to a network drive?

iemcj

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 31, 2015
409
130
It's my understanding that apple discontinued the time capsule years ago. It seems crazy and nearly useless to me to have to do a "backup" on your computers own internal drive, and the idea of having to physically plug a drive into your macbook pro kills any chance of it happening often and a user will end up with a computer crash that hasn't been backed up in months.

Am I missing something? Because man that is such an important feature to me and I'm discovering replacing my existing time capsule is going to be a big problem.
 

Soba

macrumors 6502
May 28, 2003
269
290
Rochester, NY
It's my understanding that apple discontinued the time capsule years ago. It seems crazy and nearly useless to me to have to do a "backup" on your computers own internal drive, and the idea of having to physically plug a drive into your macbook pro kills any chance of it happening often and a user will end up with a computer crash that hasn't been backed up in months.

Am I missing something? Because man that is such an important feature to me and I'm discovering replacing my existing time capsule is going to be a big problem.
As @Flint Ironstag said, you can back up to just about any old Mac (of reasonably recent vintage). You can also back up to a Linux or Unix server running recent versions of Samba. There are network attached storage appliances out there that also support Time Machine, as well.

Time Machine never backs up to the internal disk on your Mac except for some interim snapshots when your system does not have access to its backup disk; it always backs up to a second internal disk (in the case of older Mac Pro towers), an external disk, or a network share. It's unlikely that people will forget to back up because Time Machine displays repeated warnings on screen when your system has gone for many days without a backup (and will even tell you how many days it has been).

Time Machine really is backup for the masses and its one of the best features of macOS. Sometimes I wish it were more robust, but I do not at all miss the days of complex backup utilities and swapping backup tapes!
 

iemcj

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 31, 2015
409
130
As @Flint Ironstag said, you can back up to just about any old Mac (of reasonably recent vintage). You can also back up to a Linux or Unix server running recent versions of Samba. There are network attached storage appliances out there that also support Time Machine, as well.

Time Machine never backs up to the internal disk on your Mac except for some interim snapshots when your system does not have access to its backup disk; it always backs up to a second internal disk (in the case of older Mac Pro towers), an external disk, or a network share. It's unlikely that people will forget to back up because Time Machine displays repeated warnings on screen when your system has gone for many days without a backup (and will even tell you how many days it has been).

Time Machine really is backup for the masses and its one of the best features of macOS. Sometimes I wish it were more robust, but I do not at all miss the days of complex backup utilities and swapping backup tapes!
Ok cool, I have a time capsule now but am really wanting to upgrade to a more modern router. If I get a new linksys (or whatever) router with a USB port, can I just plug in a 10 tb external drive and backup to that the same way I am to my time capsule now? Thank you!
 

Soba

macrumors 6502
May 28, 2003
269
290
Rochester, NY
Ok cool, I have a time capsule now but am really wanting to upgrade to a more modern router. If I get a new linksys (or whatever) router with a USB port, can I just plug in a 10 tb external drive and backup to that the same way I am to my time capsule now? Thank you!
The device/software must specifically support Time Machine; a Mac won’t recognize a generic network share as a Time Machine backup target. There are a number of routers available that do support it, though. Research carefully; unfortunately, I have no recommendations for a good one as I do all my backing up locally.
 

satcomer

macrumors 603
Feb 19, 2008
6,496
1,016
The Finger Lakes Region
As @Flint Ironstag said, you can back up to just about any old Mac (of reasonably recent vintage). You can also back up to a Linux or Unix server running recent versions of Samba. There are network attached storage appliances out there that also support Time Machine, as well.

Time Machine never backs up to the internal disk on your Mac except for some interim snapshots when your system does not have access to its backup disk; it always backs up to a second internal disk (in the case of older Mac Pro towers), an external disk, or a network share. It's unlikely that people will forget to back up because Time Machine displays repeated warnings on screen when your system has gone for many days without a backup (and will even tell you how many days it has been).

Time Machine really is backup for the masses and its one of the best features of macOS. Sometimes I wish it were more robust, but I do not at all miss the days of complex backup utilities and swapping backup tapes!
Time Machine was made back in the hard disk external USB Or better DAS! it’s very basic. Sense then Time Machine Server was made to work on servers (for a time fee). Right now the only modern wireless router use time machine server is the Synology RT2600ac and Synology NAS boxes!
 

mmomega

macrumors 68040
Dec 30, 2009
3,411
1,577
DFW, TX
It's my understanding that apple discontinued the time capsule years ago. It seems crazy and nearly useless to me to have to do a "backup" on your computers own internal drive, and the idea of having to physically plug a drive into your macbook pro kills any chance of it happening often and a user will end up with a computer crash that hasn't been backed up in months.

Am I missing something? Because man that is such an important feature to me and I'm discovering replacing my existing time capsule is going to be a big problem.
I have been doing network based time machine backups for many, many years.

I use a QNAP 30TB at home and an UnRAID machine in one office, a FReeNAS box at another, and a MacMini as a server at another.

Also, my experience, do NOT solely rely on Time Machine itself. Also I highly recommend CarbonCopyCloner if you have data you REALLY NEED to keep.

In all locations with exception of at home, I have a NAS, that makes a backup. Backs up to another backup, and then backs up to an online solution.
At home I have a single unit that backs up online.

But it can be done. The backups even show as a Time Machine backup drive to macOS.
 

MultiFinder17

macrumors 68020
Jan 8, 2008
2,063
755
Tampa, Florida
Ok cool, I have a time capsule now but am really wanting to upgrade to a more modern router. If I get a new linksys (or whatever) router with a USB port, can I just plug in a 10 tb external drive and backup to that the same way I am to my time capsule now? Thank you!
You could always turn off the routing in your time capsule and just stick it on your network. It’ll continue to function as a time capsule, but won’t bother your new router.