Sorry to say it.. my 9.7 pro feels like more with TouchID and swipe up

thadoggfather

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Original poster
Oct 1, 2007
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loaded ios 12 on my 9.7 pro and was surprised it had the X statusbar lay out and swipe up

Also weird they dont give old iPhones swipe up but having home button, and swipe up feels like more than FaceID + swipe up but no physical button to bring pages home from playing around with an iPad 11” at the store for a bit...

Does anyone else feel this way?

Specifically with tablet use I’m referring to.
 
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thadoggfather

macrumors G4
Original poster
Oct 1, 2007
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Yes, exactly!

Haha sorry for vague ness

It feels like more of a finished product, personally. Especially since the screen as best as I can tell, is the same as what’s on my 12.9 gen 2 when looking at the new 2018 12.9.

I have that and 9.7 pro I never sold or traded in I use for regular tablet use

But I guess I have grown quite fond of TouchID/home button. Especially 2nd gen Touch ID.

I dont 100% of the time want To *have* to swipe up or crunch my hand together to exit app

On the phone I dont miss it in general but I have SE’s in case I ever do !
 
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muzzy996

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Feb 16, 2018
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Gesture control is certainly nice on touch devices, I’ve been using gesture control on my Android phones for years - it had become something that I couldn’t live without to the point that being able to root to get it was a prerequisite to a device purchase decision. My one wish is that device manufacturers allowed users to customize gesture control to their liking.
 

Freakonomics101

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Nov 6, 2014
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Apple’s iOS software for the iPad still needs a lot of improvement. The strong hardware in the Pro models aren’t being properly used. They need to give the software just for the iPad an overhaul. I don’t like that it’s basically a giant iPod. With the new Pro models costing $799 and up, for a giant iPod... unacceptable. I rarely use Touch ID on my 10.5 now, except to unlock it.

They should create something like “iPad OS” like they do with Watch OS.
 

840quadra

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Apple’s iOS software for the iPad still needs a lot of improvement. The strong hardware in the Pro models aren’t being properly used. They need to give the software just for the iPad an overhaul. I don’t like that it’s basically a giant iPod. With the new Pro models costing $799 and up, for a giant iPod... unacceptable. I rarely use Touch ID on my 10.5 now, except to unlock it.

They should create something like “iPad OS” like they do with Watch OS.
Sorry you feel that way, but I don’t agree.

Batch photo processing, and 4K video editing that I do on my iPads definitely taxes processors, RAM, and battery on these devices. On my 11, I see a big improvement over the 10.5 in this regard, and find my workload is faster on iPad. Unlike my Mac and FCPX, I don’t need to first import + render to start my work. When I add layers, text, ETC I don’t have to wait for background renders to process before I can export my video.

The iPad, and some of the available software make it a great tool. Sure Springboard updates, external Drive support, and other features would be welcomed, but it isn’t just an iPod on growth hormones.
 

ACG12

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Jun 9, 2015
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Apple’s iOS software for the iPad still needs a lot of improvement. The strong hardware in the Pro models aren’t being properly used. They need to give the software just for the iPad an overhaul. I don’t like that it’s basically a giant iPod. With the new Pro models costing $799 and up, for a giant iPod... unacceptable. I rarely use Touch ID on my 10.5 now, except to unlock it.

They should create something like “iPad OS” like they do with Watch OS.
I completely agree and it’s why I purchased a 2018 iPad over a new iPad Pro. The extra $500 didn’t seem worth it to me for a device that is heavily being held back by its software.
 
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FeliApple

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Apr 8, 2015
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I have iOS 9 on my 9.7 iPad Pro, and I really use the four-finger pinch and the swipe up for multitasking. I don't know if I'd like the iOS 12 way, feels kind of redundant.
 

FeliApple

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Apr 8, 2015
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iOS 9?

Wow you are missing out on a lot of “pro only” features that came out in 11, as well as some of the performance optimizations that are in 12.
Yeah I know, I'm missing out on a lot of features. But iOS 7 ruined my iPad 4 (not only because I don't like the new design, it was far slower, it took 2-3 hours of battery life, native apps crashed endlessly).
After iOS 7 ruined it, and after seeing multiple iOS updates negatively impact so many devices (some, more heavily - the iPhone 4s was absolutely horrible after iOS 9, both in performance and battery life; newer devices such as the iPhone 7 perform flawlessly on iOS 12, but battery life is half that of iOS 10. This seems, by the way, the new trend: performance stays acceptable - unlike before - but battery life horribly decreases).
Anyway, I digress. I decided that regardless of features that would be introduced in newer iOS versions, and regardless of app compatibility (which dwindles day-by-day on iOS 9), I would never update anything ever again. I don't buy new devices frequently, I am using this iPad and an iPhone 6s (also on iOS 9), so in order to keep performance and battery life working well, I have to refrain from updating. There's unfortunately no other way.
If and when Apple stops ruining devices with updates, then I will happily keep everything up-to-date.
 

Freakonomics101

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@FeliApple: but the whole purpose of iOS 12 is to improve performance on older devices. Have you seen iOS 12 on the 6 year old iPhone 5s and original iPad Air?

I agree with others that you are missing out but I also get why you’re hesitant to upgrade.

Anything with 2 GB of RAM will run like new on iOS 12. My iPhone SE definitely feels like it’s new again.
 
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840quadra

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Yeah I know, I'm missing out on a lot of features. But iOS 7 ruined my iPad 4 (not only because I don't like the new design, it was far slower, it took 2-3 hours of battery life, native apps crashed endlessly).
After iOS 7 ruined it, and after seeing multiple iOS updates negatively impact so many devices (some, more heavily - the iPhone 4s was absolutely horrible after iOS 9, both in performance and battery life; newer devices such as the iPhone 7 perform flawlessly on iOS 12, but battery life is half that of iOS 10. This seems, by the way, the new trend: performance stays acceptable - unlike before - but battery life horribly decreases).
Anyway, I digress. I decided that regardless of features that would be introduced in newer iOS versions, and regardless of app compatibility (which dwindles day-by-day on iOS 9), I would never update anything ever again. I don't buy new devices frequently, I am using this iPad and an iPhone 6s (also on iOS 9), so in order to keep performance and battery life working well, I have to refrain from updating. There's unfortunately no other way.
If and when Apple stops ruining devices with updates, then I will happily keep everything up-to-date.
I know what you are saying with performance. My iPhone 4 and iPad 3 were ruined by the last supported software updates as well. On iOS 12, I was reluctant to upgrade my older 5s and older iPhone 6, but glad I did.

Overall both devices are far more useful, and actually are quicker in some functions than before. I would suggest looking into reviews for your device in iOS 12, and confirm for yourself before making the change.
 

jsmith1

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Jun 6, 2010
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@FeliApple: but the whole purpose of iOS 12 is to improve performance on older devices. Have you seen iOS 12 on the 6 year old iPhone 5s and original iPad Air?

I agree with others that you are missing out but I also get why you’re hesitant to upgrade.

Anything with 2 GB of RAM will run like new on iOS 12. My iPhone SE definitely feels like it’s new again.
The is true and good info for others, my 9.7 Pro is running better on 12 and not getting the PAGE reloads I was getting before, to the point of I am thinking of sending this WAY OVERPRICED IPP 11 back...amazing how good info gets lost in the maze of fake info
 

FeliApple

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Apr 8, 2015
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@FeliApple: but the whole purpose of iOS 12 is to improve performance on older devices. Have you seen iOS 12 on the 6 year old iPhone 5s and original iPad Air?

I agree with others that you are missing out but I also get why you’re hesitant to upgrade.

Anything with 2 GB of RAM will run like new on iOS 12. My iPhone SE definitely feels like it’s new again.
iOS 12's performance is probably fine, maybe slightly worse (It is a very positive exception in that regard). Battery life is probably really low, if compared to iOS 9.
I have never seen a 5s on iOS 12. The only 5s I have used is now used by a family member and is running the original iOS 8 (bought late, it came from iOS 8 from factory). This is absolutely an anecdotal experience, but a family member has a 5s on iOS 12 and said that its battery was busted, worked poorly (at least on iOS 11) and it was too old. I told him that that was most likely false. The sole culprit of his phone working like that is the iOS update. I haven't tried it. Maybe iOS 12 improved it, I don't know. (I doubt it improved the battery life).
What I have seen and tried, is a 6+. Now, yes, I know: this is due to the anemic 1GB of RAM. This is probably a fringe case, just like the iPad 3 was (A5X didn't have enough power for a Retina display).
Battery life was two things: decent, if you take into account the amount of hours that it was getting with no context at all (which were around 7), and absolutely terrible, if you take into account what an actual non-updated plus should have gotten: I used a 7+ for a year (phone which I'd still be using, if it weren't for the fact that it's camera is broken, and after Apple outright refused to fix it, I was tired of it, and went back to my 6s), and I was getting 10-12 hours of usage. Also, performance was awful. Took ages to load and crashed all the time.
Same with the iPhone 7:A friend has one on iOS 12. Performance? Amazing. Faster than my 6s on iOS 9 in all regards. Battery life: Exactly the same on iOS 10... Half of what I'm getting on iOS 12.

It seems that Apple can't get everything right. When it manages to improve performance, it destroys battery life. Otherwise, it destroys everything.

I know what you are saying with performance. My iPhone 4 and iPad 3 were ruined by the last supported software updates as well. On iOS 12, I was reluctant to upgrade my older 5s and older iPhone 6, but glad I did.

Overall both devices are far more useful, and actually are quicker in some functions than before. I would suggest looking into reviews for your device in iOS 12, and confirm for yourself before making the change.
I don't want this to seem that I'm trolling or being negative on purpose, but I have always had the same gripe with reviews: Do people know how should their devices be working? I think people forget about how fast their devices were on the original iOS versions. (This probably applies only to battery life on iOS 12, as I said, performance is probably fine)
I will illustrate: I have seen people here say the iPhone 5c on iOS 10 is absolutely flawless.
I have it on iOS 9. It is great, actually, compared to what I should expect of a 32-bit device updated two versions of iOS. But it has absolutely no comparison to iOS 7. The keyboard has mild lag; is it absolutely unusable? No, actually, far from it, but it is there. Apps crash? No, but they take 3-4 times longer to load than what my iPod Touch 5G on iOS 6 takes. (One little fun fact: the iPod Touch is slightly faster on app launch than my 6s - yes, negligibly so, but faster indeed. That's how good iOS 6 was).
Back to the 5c: battery life. Atrocious. It should be around the same than the 5s. Furthermore, I have read that it should even have a slight edge over the 5s I was using, and the 5s had no Low Power Mode (It's on iOS 8, LPM was added on iOS 9). Well... It is horrible. 5-6 hours with Wi-Fi and light use with LPM since 100%, and 3 hours with LTE and outdoor brightness, again, LPM all along. I should be getting double with LTE, and 3 more hours with Wi-Fi. Everyone here says the 5c on iOS 10 is fine, battery life is decent, and that iOS 10 is a great surprise because of performance (arstechnica wrote a review saying that. I bet they didn't try one on iOS 7).
After writing the previous line, I looked up the review and skimmed through: it compares it to... iOS 9. And it even has worse app launch results than iOS 9: not a single one under a second. My iPod Touch 5G and 6s launch apps in under 0.8. My 5c is almost double that, and in some cases, more; yet I have read people saying iOS 10 was flawless and I should update without a sliver of a doubt, even if I were on iOS 7.
 

840quadra

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Feb 1, 2005
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Twin Cities Minnesota
I don't want this to seem that I'm trolling or being negative on purpose, but I have always had the same gripe with reviews: Do people know how should their devices be working? I think people forget about how fast their devices were on the original iOS versions. (This probably applies only to battery life on iOS 12, as I said, performance is probably fine)
I will illustrate: I have seen people here say the iPhone 5c on iOS 10 is absolutely flawless.
I have it on iOS 9. It is great, actually, compared to what I should expect of a 32-bit device updated two versions of iOS. But it has absolutely no comparison to iOS 7. The keyboard has mild lag; is it absolutely unusable? No, actually, far from it, but it is there. Apps crash? No, but they take 3-4 times longer to load than what my iPod Touch 5G on iOS 6 takes. (One little fun fact: the iPod Touch is slightly faster on app launch than my 6s - yes, negligibly so, but faster indeed. That's how good iOS 6 was).
Back to the 5c: battery life. Atrocious. It should be around the same than the 5s. Furthermore, I have read that it should even have a slight edge over the 5s I was using, and the 5s had no Low Power Mode (It's on iOS 8, LPM was added on iOS 9). Well... It is horrible. 5-6 hours with Wi-Fi and light use with LPM since 100%, and 3 hours with LTE and outdoor brightness, again, LPM all along. I should be getting double with LTE, and 3 more hours with Wi-Fi. Everyone here says the 5c on iOS 10 is fine, battery life is decent, and that iOS 10 is a great surprise because of performance (arstechnica wrote a review saying that. I bet they didn't try one on iOS 7).
After writing the previous line, I looked up the review and skimmed through: it compares it to... iOS 9. And it even has worse app launch results than iOS 9: not a single one under a second. My iPod Touch 5G and 6s launch apps in under 0.8. My 5c is almost double that, and in some cases, more; yet I have read people saying iOS 10 was flawless and I should update without a sliver of a doubt, even if I were on iOS 7.
Not trolling at all, they are your devices! :)

I have no idea how much the reviewers remember about their test devices speed as new, as I stated above I updated both my 6 and 5S (both with slower processors than your ipad) and saw no slowdowns. Have owned both since new, handed them down to family, and got them back once I upgraded their devices to newer phones. Now as secondary devices, each gets used almost daily. The only reason my 5S remained on 9 was because of some legacy applications that I have since switched over to my 3rd gen iPad on iOS 9.3.5. On my devices, I saw no significant slowdowns in benchmarks and in real use as compared to their old iOS versions (10 and 9 in this case). As with anything, YMMV

In your case I wouldn’t upgrade. You seem happy, and have so many concerns with the newer software that I expect that you would fixate on the negatives. As long as you can still run the apps you need, and don’t have security concerns, I think older versions of iOS are fine, and nice to have around.
 
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FeliApple

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Not trolling at all, they are your devices! :)

I have no idea how much the reviewers remember about their test devices speed as new, as I stated above I updated both my 6 and 5S (both with slower processors than your ipad) and saw no slowdowns. Have owned both since new, handed them down to family, and got them back once I upgraded their devices to newer phones. Now as secondary devices, each gets used almost daily. The only reason my 5S remained on 9 was because of some legacy applications that I have since switched over to my 3rd gen iPad on iOS 9.3.5. On my devices, I saw no significant slowdowns in benchmarks and in real use as compared to their old iOS versions (10 and 9 in this case). As with anything, YMMV

In your case I wouldn’t upgrade. You seem happy, and have so many concerns with the newer software that I expect that you would fixate on the negatives. As long as you can still run the apps you need, and don’t have security concerns, I think older versions of iOS are fine, and nice to have around.
Reviewers praising newer versions of some devices is odd, too. They use the newest devices all the time, I would expect them to know that an iPhone 5c is fine on iOS 10, but nowhere near iOS 7. Then again, I have a thought regarding that. They just test them. A few minutes to a few hours, with native apps, once, and that's it. They don't use them as their main devices, installing apps and games, checking battery life from the beginning to the end of the day. It's impossible to know how do they run if they just use it with native apps for an hour. Reviewing based on that, in my opinion, would be almost insulting to readers.
Yeah, newer, 64-bit devices are far better at withstanding the constantly increasing requirements on newer iOS versions. They are being increasingly fluent, even while heavily updated. Regardless of whatever slowdown there might be, a 5s on iOS 12 will run miles around a 4s on iOS 9, or the iPod Touch 5G on iOS 9. The 5s even more so. The only heavy complaints I have seen began with iOS 11. Every single previous version was actually running fine for most people.
Don't get me wrong: Everything isn't bright and shiny. I have wanted to download a lot of apps that I couldn't. I have been wanting to record my screen for ages; the drag and drop function of iOS 11 would be really nice to have, and the shortcuts app would be really fun to experiment with.
When I get a new device, I'll be able to do all that, plus, I will have a perfectly working device to use as a backup or travel device. I just have to wait until I buy a new one. What you say is also true: If I update now, I'll notice every single little thing that doesn't work perfectly; even more so if those things worked perfectly before updating. I'll just have to tolerate these little quirks until I get a new device.
 
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Booji

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Nov 17, 2011
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Sorry you feel that way, but I don’t agree.

Batch photo processing, and 4K video editing that I do on my iPads definitely taxes processors, RAM, and battery on these devices. On my 11, I see a big improvement over the 10.5 in this regard, and find my workload is faster on iPad. Unlike my Mac and FCPX, I don’t need to first import + render to start my work. When I add layers, text, ETC I don’t have to wait for background renders to process before I can export my video.

The iPad, and some of the available software make it a great tool. Sure Springboard updates, external Drive support, and other features would be welcomed, but it isn’t just an iPod on growth hormones.
4K video editing seems to be the sweet spot for the new Pros.
 

Kendo

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Apr 4, 2011
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I'm confused. Does the new iOS let a non-Face ID iPad get the swipe up gestures instead of having to press the home button?
 

Freakonomics101

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Nov 6, 2014
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I'm confused. Does the new iOS let a non-Face ID iPad get the swipe up gestures instead of having to press the home button?
Yes. Both from an app and the lock screen. They have all iPhone X gestures, just like the new iPad Pro models do.
 

thadoggfather

macrumors G4
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Oct 1, 2007
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I stand corrected. After some time with the new slim design swipe up on apps feels natural and intuitive

On the older “air” bezel design it feels Nice but Like a jailbreak tweak more than Its native implementation / intended purpose. Idk
 
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Raist3001

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Mar 5, 2012
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Right behind you
I preferred the iPads gestures prior to them getting the iPhone X gestures. Those gestures were the sole reason I wanted the X. The status bar on the iPad seems silly to mimic that on the X since there is no bezel notch on the iPads. I liked being able to just swipe up from the bottom to enter multi tasking, and also see the control center.

I too wish that apple would release an iPad OS to harness the power of the iPad.