Spanish Fascism was not racist

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by aaronvan, Mar 29, 2015.

  1. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #1
    Franco did not subscribe to the mystical-occult balderdash that so enthralled the Nazis, nor did he promote a "völkisch" cult of the racial superiority of Spaniards. In fact, many Moors fought in Franco's armies. Basically, Franco was a reactionary whose primary concerns were with power and anti-Communism.

    Incidentally, Hitler and Mussolini chose war, and started WWII to conquer Europe and both met violent deaths in the ruins of their nations. Franco remained WWII neutral and ruled until 1975. However, the Fascist system did not survive him for long.

    Makes me wonder if Nazi Germany or Fascist Italy would have survived their leaders.
     
  2. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #2
    In the 1930s and 40s the entire world was racist.

    For a first hand glimpse into racism in Nazi Germany, I recommend this:

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #3
    Francoist Spain was racist although of a somewhat less ethnic basis than the other fascist countries,broad details here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_children_of_Francoism

    The Army of Africa indeed supported effectively the Francoists during the war though this doesn't mean the majority of Moroccans supported him.The Anarchists had made preparations to sent people to North Africa to aid in local revolts ( during the Rif war the Berbers had kicked the ***** out of the Spanish Army).But by that time the Stalinists had betrayed them and they had to fight for their own survival.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_of_Africa_(Spain)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rif_War
     
  4. Scepticalscribe, Mar 30, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2015

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #4
    Well, we have just had a thread which came with the title "Italian Fascism Was Not Racist", followed by this one, the title of which is "Spanish Fascism Was Not Racist".

    I await, with bated breath, for the (inevitable?) thread which will bear the title "German Fascism Was Not Racist".

    Fascism (like communism, indeed, like reform communism, and like other political systems) adapted itself to the political contours and cultures of the countries where it successfully took root.

    This meant that different aspects of the belief system - or different aspects of the ideology, or philosophy, - were emphasised in the respective countries which developed authentically indigenous fascist movements.
     
  5. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #5
    Of course, you are absolutely right. Racism and antisemitism were an international phenomenon and present before first nationalism, then facism and then what we now call communism took hold of the world. In Germany the Nazi regime used the already prevailant antisemitism to create emotions for their ideology. This developed into the holocaust. After WWII, in communist russia, jews continued to be discriminated against.
     
  6. sigmadog macrumors 6502a

    sigmadog

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    #6
    This just in: Generalisimo Francisco Franco is still dead.
     
  7. aaronvan thread starter Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #7
  8. mojolicious macrumors 68000

    mojolicious

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    #8
    Racism and theories of racial purity/superiority aren't tenets of fascism, although fascism's nationalism and the whole 'will to power' shtick lend themselves nicely to viewing other ethnicities as being inferior.

    Spanish fascism, in the guise of the Falange, died when Franco co-opted the movement. The Falange weren't particularly bothered about your race, just as long as you were a good Catholic, and Franco actually turned out to be something of a friend to the Jews. Spain allowed thousands of displaced Jews to pass through the country during WW2, and it was on Franco's watch that Jews were officially permitted to openly live and worship in Spain for the first time since 1492.

    Anti-Semitism was never going to thrive in a country without Jews, of course, and Spain had pretty much bugger all 'colonials' to oppress. I'm sure that if Spain had been a less homogenous society then race would have been much more of an issue for the authoritarian right. As it was, Franco had a full blown hardline socialist government to worry about: internal political opposition on a scale that Benny and Adolf never had to face. Francoism basically boiled down to a largely pragmatic 'anti socialism'.

    The Generalísimo had his fun with the Catalans and Basques after the civil war, of course...
     
  9. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #9
    Are you racist against Jovians? Of course not, they don't exist (as far as we know).

    Claiming that the Franco regime was not racist is beyond ridiculous. Of course it was, or rather, it would have been, had there been any significant race minority as we understand them today. It's kind of hard to be racist against blacks when there are no blacks around. Racism in its other variants (towards regionalism, local languages, religions...) was, however, alive and well under the Franco regime.
     
  10. anti-microsoft macrumors 68000

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    #10
    The Catalans suffered immense oppression under Franco. Segregation, almost.
     
  11. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68030

    Ulenspiegel

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    #11
    Racism goes hand in hand with discrimination and as such the Franco regime was racist.
    To echo Scepticalscribe's thoughts I think it would be much more interesting to dwell on the post-Franco era, how the country handled the transition. It was/is examplary at least for a handful of countries in Central and Eastern Europe, for instance. The transition of these particular countries was/is far from being ideal when they still are heavily preoccupied with the past and not the present as well as future.
     
  12. sim667 macrumors 65816

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    #12
    It still cuts deep to this day in catalunya.
     

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