Speed test 12" PB 1.5ghz 1.25gb vs 12" 1.3ghz iBook 1.5gbs of ram

California

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Aug 21, 2004
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I'm curious.

Anyone hazard a guess as to whether or not the 12" powerbook 1.5ghz maxed w/ 1.25gbs of ram is faster or slower than the 12" ibook 1.33ghz maxed w/ 1.5gbs of ram?

Wonder if the hard drive cache makes a difference, too. The 1.33 has a Toshiba 4200 GAS while the 1.5 pb has a Toshiba 5400 GAX.

Since it looks like I'm dropping a GAX into the iBook, that might even things up even more -- I am just really dumb about understanding speed -- would the extra 256mbs on the iBook make up for the 1.66mhz CPU speed difference?

These machines are nearly identical but for the ibook being heavier and less precious. Just wondering about the speed.
 

mad jew

Moderator emeritus
Apr 3, 2004
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It really depends on what you're using it for. CPU speed and amount of RAM aren't very interchangeable in terms of measurement parameters. "More RAM" is only useful in its ability to cut back on the slow task of writing to and from the hard disk.

In other words, each user has a set amount of RAM they use and buying more will most probably not make the computer quicker. In short, it really depends on the user. :)
 

brendel95

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May 23, 2005
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In the case of average use, speed will be almost same. But for the cpu intensive job (such as scientific computing), 1.5Ghz should be faster than 1.33Ghz.

Although ibook is a nice machine still, powerbook always feels right and have better build quality than ibook for me.

Unless you are doing such a time matter computing job. ibook will be better choice considering price difference.
 

California

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Aug 21, 2004
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brendel95 said:
In the case of average use, speed will be almost same. But for the cpu intensive job (such as scientific computing), 1.5Ghz should be faster than 1.33Ghz.

Although ibook is a nice machine still, powerbook always feels right and have better build quality than ibook for me.

Unless you are doing such a time matter computing job. ibook will be better choice considering price difference.
Related question -- how come the PB only has 256mb built in on motherboard when the iBooks updated this meager apportionment last rev.?

Or maybe I just answered it. Apple didn't officially "update" the 12" PB, so maybe that's why.
 

colosodian

macrumors member
May 1, 2005
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SF Bay Area
California said:
Related question -- how come the PB only has 256mb built in on motherboard when the iBooks updated this meager apportionment last rev.?

Or maybe I just answered it. Apple didn't officially "update" the 12" PB, so maybe that's why.
ibook_steve said:
The 12" Powerbook has only 256 MB on the motherboard as opposed to the 512 MB on the iBook. So the iBook can now have a higher max memory than the 12" (1.5 GB vs. 1.25 GB). As far as making the change on the Powerbook, it's not just soldering down different chips. Higher capacity chips are much more expensive. On the iBook, they probably changed the memory package type from a TSSOP to BGA (ball grid array). You can fit twice as many chips in the same area, but you have to reroute the board. The expense may not be worth it for the 12", further indicating it's near EOL.
I asked that same question a few weeks ago and got that reply.
 

YS2003

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Dec 24, 2004
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Finally I have arrived.....
I have both machines you are comparing. I noticed my 12" PB is faster overall comopared to my iBook. Both Macs are maxed out on the RAM as you can see in my sig. I also feel Safari is even faster in loading the website (both machines are connected to Belkin 54G wireless hub via Airport Express). I think this is due to PB's faster chip, faster bus, faster HD, better GPU.
 

doucy2

macrumors 65816
Jul 7, 2005
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i think the 1.5 is faster since the hd is 5400rpm over 4200rpm (really slow)
the faser processor should make up for that minisclue ram difference
the 1.5 is faster in my book
but i would pick the onw you feel most comfortable with

just my 2 cents worth

BTW i have a PB 1.5ghz 1gb comming soon lol i can't wait
 

California

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Aug 21, 2004
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YS2003 said:
I have both machines you are comparing. I noticed my 12" PB is faster overall comopared to my iBook. Both Macs are maxed out on the RAM as you can see in my sig. I also feel Safari is even faster in loading the website (both machines are connected to Belkin 54G wireless hub via Airport Express). I think this is due to PB's faster chip, faster bus, faster HD, better GPU.
So, if I drop a 5400rpm Toshiba with 16mb cache into the iBook (forty gig) in order to keep under the warranty radar when I put a superdrive in the iBook (while it is open, mght as well put a faster hd in, too) that would even things up?

What does a faster bus do in the PB?
 

YS2003

macrumors 68020
Dec 24, 2004
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Finally I have arrived.....
California said:
So, if I drop a 5400rpm Toshiba with 16mb cache into the iBook (forty gig) in order to keep under the warranty radar when I put a superdrive in the iBook (while it is open, mght as well put a faster hd in, too) that would even things up?

What does a faster bus do in the PB?
For late model Mac portables (AL and new iBook lines), I am very weary about opening up the machine to put in new HD as it seems it is very complicated with all those different screws and intricate assembly Apple chose for those models. If you are looking for a speed, I would recommend you go for a PB from a get-go (in this case, you don't need to bother with HD upgade, optical drive upgrate and etc). It is around $1500 for a 12" model (about $500 higher than iBook); By the time, you put in new HD and DVD burner, I think the price difference is almost none. I am not sure of your budget for your new machine. But, if I am going for a faster machine, I won't hesitate going for PB anytime (my motto is not to go cheap on the machines if I am going to regret I do not get top of the line in the model line-up). My iBook is for on the road so that I don't unnecessarily subject my PBs to dents and scratches. AL casing for PBs is a beauty to behold by itself.
 

840quadra

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Feb 1, 2005
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brendel95 said:
Although ibook is a nice machine still, powerbook always feels right and have better build quality than ibook for me.
Why is that? Because it is aluminum as opposed to poly?

I never really thought the build quality on these, but now that I do, I am having a hard time picking one over the other . :confused:
 

California

macrumors 68040
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Aug 21, 2004
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YS2003 said:
For late model Mac portables (AL and new iBook lines), I am very weary about opening up the machine to put in new HD as it seems it is very complicated with all those different screws and intricate assembly Apple chose for those models. If you are looking for a speed, I would recommend you go for a PB from a get-go (in this case, you don't need to bother with HD upgade, optical drive upgrate and etc). It is around $1500 for a 12" model (about $500 higher than iBook); By the time, you put in new HD and DVD burner, I think the price difference is almost none. I am not sure of your budget for your new machine. But, if I am going for a faster machine, I won't hesitate going for PB anytime (my motto is not to go cheap on the machines if I am going to regret I do not get top of the line in the model line-up). My iBook is for on the road so that I don't unnecessarily subject my PBs to dents and scratches. AL casing for PBs is a beauty to behold by itself.
The mountain is there, I'm tempted to cllimb it. But 'ppreciate your analysis. I'm keeping the PB, but I would've been tempted to open her up if there already hadn't been a 16mb Toshiba hd in there. I had one of those in a 1ghz iBook a few months back and that thing was very fast.
 

ITASOR

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Mar 20, 2005
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840quadra said:
Why is that? Because it is aluminum as opposed to poly?

I never really thought the build quality on these, but now that I do, I am having a hard time picking one over the other . :confused:
I've had/seen both and I don't think the powerbooks are better build quality. Perhaps a few, but if you get two that are actually put together right, the iBook is plastic and one's metal...of course there's a little difference (such as bending, moving a little) but that's because of the material, not build quality.
 

OutThere

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Dec 19, 2002
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840quadra said:
Why is that? Because it is aluminum as opposed to poly?

I never really thought the build quality on these, but now that I do, I am having a hard time picking one over the other . :confused:
It's really hard to explain, but my Powerbook feels much more solid than my iBook ever felt, plus it's resistant to little hairline scratches that the iBook's polycarbonate just loved.
 

840quadra

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OutThere said:
It's really hard to explain, but my Powerbook feels much more solid than my iBook ever felt, plus it's resistant to little hairline scratches that the iBook's polycarbonate just loved.
I guess I understand what you and ITASOR are saying.

I just don't think scratches have much to do with build quality, just how well you take care of your equipment.
 

OutThere

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Dec 19, 2002
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840quadra said:
I guess I understand what you and ITASOR are saying.

I just don't think scratches have much to do with build quality, just how well you take care of your equipment.
I can see how it'd be hard get a feel for the difference....basically you have to use each of them for a few weeks, then subtle differences come to light.

My iBook G4 rev. A's trackpad rattled slightly, the battery sagged a little, the display assembly was ever-so-slightly crooked, and, not related to build quality, the screen had white spots and the logic board failed.

As of yet I haven't found any little details like that with my Powerbook...it's sturdy, well put together and everything fits well. There aren't any plasticky creaks when I push or lift parts of it, and when I pick it up it doesn't feel like anything is flexing. I guess it's just a sense of how well it all fits together.
 

California

macrumors 68040
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Aug 21, 2004
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As to build quality, I have to say PB, but that's only because aluminum fits together better than bendable plastic. Thanks for the tips and analysis guys.

The pb is slightly smaller and I will have to take extra care with it regarding bumps and bruises; where with the iBk, it's a little more casual and easier to put on a new top lid or bottom case if they get really beat up. I'm grooving on the fact I've got the smallest (if not lightest) 'book Apple will likely to ever make.
 

Morn

macrumors 6502
Oct 26, 2005
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Metal feels harder to touch than plastic. ;) But it reality it's weaker than polycarbonate, dents easier, less resistant to impacts and warping. It might scratch more easily, but it's more hardy in suffering serious damage.
 

California

macrumors 68040
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Aug 21, 2004
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Morn said:
Metal feels harder to touch than plastic. ;) But it reality it's weaker than polycarbonate, dents easier, less resistant to impacts and warping. It might scratch more easily, but it's more hardy in suffering serious damage.
Yeah, you are right.