Spexit? Spain's conservative People's Party (PP) wins the most seats in today's election

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by aaronvan, Jun 26, 2016.

  1. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #1
  2. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

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    #2
  3. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #3
    have choses? is lolcat involved?
     
  4. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #4
    Spain is overloaded in debt and has had a very high rate of unemployment. Their troubles come from a mix of EU regulations and home-grown excessive spending--and corruption. Spain has more problems with Basque separatists than with would-be Spexits.

    Always be cautious about political labels in Europe. Commonly quite different than in the US.
     
  5. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #5
    Their names start becoming interchangeable once you start getting to the extremes of the spectrum. They always want to advertise the populist notion that they're for you.

    It's why I'm generally distrustful of anything that advertises itself as such. The People's Republic of China isn't really a republic for the people, now is it? Neither was the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, or National Socialism. It's why I'll start stocking up on beans, bullets, and gold the moment something like the People's Faith Freedom Coalition starts gaining popular support here in the states.
     
  6. aaronvan thread starter Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #6
    We keep hearing about the austerity boogeyman yet Spain just granted an austerity party the most seats in their government.
     
  7. LizKat macrumors 68040

    LizKat

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    #7
    For my money, Spain can vote whichever way it wants as long as it keeps exporting great sheep's milk cheese that ends up in the Wegman's supermarket up in Ithaca. There are some aspects of globalization I admit to being hooked on.
     
  8. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #8
    Agreed. We have similar in the states, such as the Affordable Care Act.
     
  9. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #9
    Yeah, because having to pay for insurance to balance out healthcare costs is an act of political hate on par with gulags and pogroms.

    Be glad you live in a society so peaceful and well maintained that something as innocuous as a halfassed attempt at healthcare reform can be treated as the grosses of tyrannies. I couldn't imagine how badly you'd react if you had to face a real threat to life and liberty.
     
  10. juanm, Jun 27, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2016

    juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #10
    The PP (corrupt, right) just won because they were able to mobilise their voters against Podemos, one of the new parties
    Spain has a disproportionate amount of old people, and those born in the 30s-50s were educated and indoctrinated under a dictatorial catholic regime, they will keep voting for the catholic right no matter how corrupt, no matter the austerity and its ineffectiveness. Younger generations are much more open to new parties, but we'll have to wait until the older generations die, because simply put, old people in Spain will NEVER change their vote. They don't watch the news, they don't read newspapers, they simply don't care. They'll just do whatever the church dictates (remember, they lived decades of indoctrination under a CATHOLIC-backed dictatorship). In Spain there was no baby boom per se as they had their own dictator and didn't play a part in WW2. Worse, for the first two decades of the dictatorship (from roughly early forties until the early sixties) they bred like crazy, with families of six children or more being very common (my father has eight siblings for instance).

    Just in the last six months, we've had:
    A minister with companies in Jersey and Panama
    Major city mayors arrested on multiple (10+ counts)
    A leak showing the names of people close to the PP who paid just 2% in taxes (vs 45% + fine) after a fiscal amnisty designed by the PP allowed them to launder their money
    A plot by PP politicians to throw acid in a river in order to seal a deal with another water provider close to them.
    More austerity (in terms of healthcare and education)
    Multiple (too many to count) cases of illegal financing and public money being flat out stolen.
    A law that reduces the time judges have to investigate corruption charges before they are exonerated automatically
    Plus much more. And that's only since January.

    Now, much like in the case of Brexit, old, uneducated people decide our future (although admittedly this is just a four years contract, not for the decades to come) and as time goes by they will eventually die.

    Regarding the "Spexit", it's nonsense, none of the four main parties have it in mind, and especially not the PP. They are not really pro-europe, all they want is a stable context to steal as much as they can.

    That said, we'll now have another four years of austerity/corruption (I'm talking tens of billions at multiple levels) so there won't be much left when the PP are done in four years (and that's a best case scenario) and maybe then we'll be forced (against our will) to quit the Eurozone (not the EU) in order to have some control over our finances.
     
  11. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #11
    :D
    That had me physically laughing.
     
  12. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    #12
    Spain can't afford to break away from the EU. The UK can.

    There is a huge difference there.
     
  13. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    No, neither could, as we'll see in the coming years.
     
  14. twietee, Jun 27, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2016

    twietee macrumors 603

    twietee

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    #14
    Good and interesting post. Yes, it's a pity with your country. :) I love how the younger generation (my gf was living in Barcelona for 4 years - from 2008 on where the crisis was around peak and was there really often) in my experience has an extremely healthy political stance. Discussing things (also across the generations) - on the street and plazas that is and not just anonymously in the internet - and not just drama or apathy while still largely being unemployd or held hostage in a corrupt system.
    - Not talking about the Catalans though, that is a different matter and lead to a lot of head shaking, but we tried alsways to remember that dictatorship in Spain lasted much longer than my inner compass tells me by default (born in the 80s).

    Say, there was a brief note in the telly yesterday regarding the Spanish vote (and a nod to our soon to become ex-partners I guess..but we can see that all over Europe sadly) that the vote and the campaigns weren't filled with cheap populism as we see it in almost every country nowadays. Would you agree to that? Hard to say I guess when the PP just won (again and again and again despite the state your country is in for such a long time)
     

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