Spin off- Should Prisoners Have rights?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by NT1440, Jun 27, 2008.

  1. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #1
    To spin off from another thread. Do you guys feel prisoners should be allowed rights?

    I personally feel ALL people should have rights (after all, rights by defination cant be taken away)

    Some members of the forums feel that they shouldnt.

    Thoughts/opinions/insults anyone?
     
  2. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    #2
    Of course they have rights. However, that doesn't mean they should have the same rights as someone not in prison. On the other hand, life shouldn't be cushy for them behind bars either.
     
  3. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
  4. djellison macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    Pasadena CA
    #4
    Oh - absolutely - their basic human needs should be fullfilled. Food, water, shelter and some education.

    What they shouldn't get is television, games consoles, magazines, cigarettes, etc.
     
  5. NT1440 thread starter macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #5
    reguardless of their crime?
     
  6. Badandy macrumors 68040

    Badandy

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Location:
    Terminus
    #6
    What are you suggesting, we not give them water? :confused:
     
  7. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
    #7
    An idea to solve the cost of executions.

    Most can live for 2 weeks, or more, without food.

    But no one can live much more than 3 days without water.

    I like the way you think. ;)

     
  8. NT1440 thread starter macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #8
    no, there are some people that suggest that people commiting higher crimes (rape, murder) should have less rights than less crimes (theft, drug use).

    i personally dont see it this way
     
  9. djellison macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    Pasadena CA
    #9
    I think he's suggesting (correct me if I'm wrong ) that if it's a tiny crime, perhaps they should be allowed the luxuries such as TV etc.

    I say no - they shouldn't. Prison should be something to be feared, to be dreaded, to be scared of. It should be a dreadful, dreadful experience. Spending all day in your bedroom watching Sky TV ( as many many prisoners do ) sounds like the average teenagers life to be honest. It's not a harsh punishment.

    Prison should be hell. If you've done a small crime, you go there for a short time. If you've done a bad crime, you go there for a long time. But in either case, it should be the most horrid, dreadful, soul destroying experience. People do a 'medium' crime ( robbery, breaking and entering, GBH etc ) have a few months in a prison, go home, and then do it again. Prison is not a deterrent at the moment, because it's simply not unpleasant enough.

    Doug
     
  10. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Jobs' Spare Liver Jar
    #10
    Would you take away books, too? We'd hate for any criminal to have a chance to rehabilitate him or herself, pay their debt to society, and be encouraged to lead a law-abiding life upon release.

    Also, prison is never a deterrent for criminals, because criminals never believe they will be caught.
     
  11. QCassidy352 macrumors G3

    QCassidy352

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2003
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #11
    You've obviously never seen the inside of a real prison.
     
  12. NT1440 thread starter macrumors G4

    NT1440

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hartford, CT
    #12
    i suppose u also think things such as putting substances in your own body are an acceptable reason to be in jail, what about those people?
     
  13. Gray-Wolf macrumors 68030

    Gray-Wolf

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2008
    Location:
    Pandora, Home Tree
    #13
    Prisoners, should be treated humanly, but that should be the limit of their rights. By doing the crime, rights should be forfeited. If they want to work out, study law, or any other privilege, they should be required to work for it. Behave, work, and be the model prisoner, you get a privilege. NOT the taxpayers paying for them to get free medical, dental, clothing, 3 squares a day, while honest folk have to work for all of it. Oh, and no cable tv. The jail in Arizona, is the ideal one, including the pink underwear. ;)
     
  14. zap2 macrumors 604

    zap2

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Washington D.C
    #14
    Thank YOU!

    If we want prisons to be useful, where we put people who did wrong in, and lawful people come out, we need to reimagine whats a "prison" is.

    And none of this no water stuff.....torturing anyone is disgusting on every level.
     
  15. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
    Republic of Ukistan
    #15
    "Prisoners" is not a very meaningful term, as it includes those on remand, those wrongly convicted, those guilty of both the worst and also of relatively minor crimes, those guilty of fraud, those guilty of victimless crimes, those guilty of doing anything that our society finds undesirable at any particular time. Depriving such people as a class of proper food, learning materials, health care, exercise and any chance of social interaction as well as depriving them of their liberty is not only inhumane and inappropriate, but entirely counterproductive. Prisons would be even harder to run, hard cases would have less to lose, many more people would be acutely traumatised, damaged, antisocial and unable to reintegrate with society outside, besides which the impartiality and humanity of our justice and sentencing system would be fatally compromised. What good would this serve?
     
  16. Much Ado macrumors 68000

    Much Ado

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #16
    What, do tell, is wrong with that?

    If I was imprisoned for civil disobedience by opposing a law I did not agree with (e.g. ID cards), I should at least have the right to vote against those supporting them whilst behind bars.

    Many people seem to see the word 'prisoner' and presume they are permanently locked up, but if rehabilitation and reintegration with society is an aim, then denying someone the vote is only going to disenfranchise them further.
     
  17. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #17
    Great post. To answer your question, it serves the need that some people seem to have for vengeance. It also serves the need to some degree for spectacle. Even if we can't literally see it, it's fun for the vengeful types to imagine people suffering in prison.

    As for depriving people of the right to vote, fundamentally that should not be allowable. What possible good does it serve to deprive people on the right to vote?
     
  18. SMM macrumors 65816

    SMM

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Location:
    Tiger Mountain - WA State
    #18
    I thought this was going to be about Gitmo, Abu Ghraib, Camp Cooper, etc. These institutions are the ones in which the prisoner rights, have been the focus of recent debate. This is what I am going to speak to.

    Anyone we detain, has the right to habeus corpus protection. Yet, we are holding people for years, without telling them what they are being detained, is immoral, and illegal.

    Those detainees, should have a right to a speedy trial, instead of just holding them in limbo.

    Detainees have a right to protection against cruel and unusual punishment. Yet, the atrocities committed against them is inhuman.

    Enemy combatants must be held as prisoners of war. They fall under the terms of the Geneva Convention, which the US ratified years ago.

    The Bush administration is full of little boys, drunk with power. The rest of the World is looking on and shaking their heads. "What has become of the America, which used to stand up for human rights"? We have become just like the Japanese, North Koreans, and the North Vietnamese, on how they mistreated and tortured our servicemen during those wars. We used to be respected around the world for our humanity, although this was sometimes suspect. In seven plus years, Bushco has made that disappear like a fart in the wind. I did not fight the Vietnam war, to watch my Country become a larger version of a banana republic. I despise the neocons for what they have done to it. And yet, we are still trying to criticize other countries and governments, for doing the same things. It blows through the hypocrisy stop like a runaway train.
     
  19. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    Fighting to stay in the EU
    #19
    They should have rights, but we're a bit mad in this country and give inmates games consoles and TVs. I'd rather not be funding criminals to play on consoles I can't buy myself (dratted student loan).
    But on a similar hand if they have games consoles then that increases the potential market for my games :D

    But yes. Rights are a right. They may have f**ked up big time and ended up in gaol but, said with gritted teeth, they are still human.
     
  20. Erwin-Br macrumors 6502a

    Erwin-Br

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2008
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #20
    A soul destroying experience, huh? - So someone who steals a pack of gum from the store goes to jail for, say, two weeks and returns to sociaty completely broken, and becomes a serial killer.

    Uhuh, that's the way to go. :rolleyes:

    --Erwin
     
  21. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
    Republic of Ukistan
    #21
    Many "average teenagers" probably regard their own lives as a dreadful experience. Watching Sky TV all day should be punishment enough for anybody, anyway.

    This is so wrong. What is worse than losing your liberty and independence? Why should you want to destroy anybody's soul as well? For your own desire for revenge? Out of jealousy that they thought they could get away with something? And, as a professed atheist, what on earth do you mean by "soul-destroying" anyway? When these people - many of whom will have been locked up on remand, on dodgy evidence, for victimless crimes and so on - eventually come out to rejoin society, is it in anyone's interest to have them broken, brutalised and destroyed?
     
  22. Mord macrumors G4

    Mord

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #22
    They deserve basic human rights as much as anyone does.

    Hence the "emo subculture" it's not fun being an average teenager. Once or twice I had the lifestyle enforced upon me while I stayed with friends and it's utterly horrific, on the one hand while I consider it partly the teen's fault for not being able to take some initiative and go outside and do things if they just don't know any better due to a rubbish upbringing it's more their parents fault.

    It still doesn't make bitching and whining about having a privileged middle class upbringing ok.
     
  23. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
    Location:
    Republic of Ukistan
    #23
    We are all criminals. Prisoners are just the ones who got caught.
     
  24. Mord macrumors G4

    Mord

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #24
    For most people the law is just a rough guideline.

    Including myself.
     
  25. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #25
    Exactly. Most of those calling jail "cushy" probably don't know a thing about them. My Father works as a teacher in a jail, and let me tell you, he has some stories. Jail is far from an enjoyable experience. And for those thinking we shouldn't have teachers in jail and it should be all about punishment, you're forgetting that many of these people have committed smaller crimes, and will be out on the streets soon. I'd rather they be more educated, because that reduces recidivism. It's not like we can lock everyone up forever, nor should we.

    In some countries, their jails are actually even far nicer than ours, and yet their crime rates are actually lower.
     

Share This Page