Sports announcer slams African Americans for going pro too early

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by 63dot, Apr 2, 2010.

  1. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #1
    This morning I was listening to a local sports announcer on ABC talk radio mentioning that the newer rules which govern the NBA not allowing an 18 year old to go pro was fair and made common sense. But he said it's perfectly fine for the current rule for 19 year olds to go pro. One year, as if that's going to make a difference, right? Somehow, according to this "expert" and the talk show host interviewing him, it would keep African-Americans in college for at least a year before they became professional basketball players.

    What?

    First of all how many 18 year olds of any race have what it takes to be one of the best basketball players in the world and go pro? And if somebody is that good, like Kobe Bryant was, then why bar a person that talented from joining right after high school? When Kobe went pro at 18, it's not as if he suffered on the court and he certainly did well financially.

    Also, if the rule stands at 19 years old, how can just one year of college help anybody, of any race, if they have the goods to be one of the best in pro basketball? Would one year of college improve your ability to dunk, pass, or hit 3-pointers?

    And should the music industry, the film industry, the modeling industry also have rules saying a person has to be 19 to get signed? Why should a professional basketball player need to have one year of college any more than a musician, actor, or model?

    This 19 year old, or older rule for the NBA is stupid and makes absolutely no sense. Arguments for the 19 year old rule say that signing somebody at 18 (legal adult mind you) will make that person be at risk for the child actor syndrome of falling into drugs and being lost in adulthood like Gary Coleman, Danny Bonaduce, or Dana Plato.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
  3. StruckANerve macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Location:
    Rio Rancho, NM
    #3
    It's a personal choice. They are adults and can make their own decisions.
     
  4. macfan881 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    #4
    Boy we bring racisim into anything now granted that but this is the NBA but I do agree I mean look how many kids turned out to be top All Stars Kobe James and VC and look at the others I even think those guy could have benifited from getting a year or two in college B-Ball too.
     
  5. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Location:
    Terminus
    #5
    It doesn't matter that you think they'd benefit from a year in college, should they be required to? I submit that meritocracy should prevail. If you're good enough I don't think you should be forced to go to college. If anyone is so good at their job that they don't need formal education to be world class at it, they shouldn't be forced to do something they don't want.
     
  6. IntheNet macrumors regular

    IntheNet

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2009
    #6
    My thoughts here are that if we trust an 18 year old soldier to stand behind a weapon in Iraq, why not allow them behind the key on the pro basketball court at that age?

    Apparently the NBA has a rule that all drafted players must be at least 19 years old during the calendar year of the draft (instituted 2005/2006 season). Is that what you're referencing? Is so, I am ambivalent; mixed feelings pro and con... it may protect young players but I am more concerned that if a scholarship winner blows off college at 18 in freshman college year to go pro he wastes those scholarships and their potential...if he/she goes direct pro from high school I have no concerns...
     
  7. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #7
    Excellent point.

    I don't think forcing somebody to do one year of college will make that person a better basketball player or suddenly turn them into a lifelong scholar destined for a PhD because of that one year.

    The thing about college is that if things don't work out in basketball, you can always go to college at any age after high school. All you need is your brain and a lot of patience and drive.

    But for NBA basketball, there is a small window on how effectively most pro players can play and stay signed year after year. In many professional sports, due to the intense competition and possibility of injuries, one can say they had a stellar career if they made good money and made it to age 30 whether it's baseball, football, or the NBA.

    The lowest paid person in any of those three American professional sports certainly make more than any group of people I have seen. A year or two in the pros should more than be enough to set one up for college costs if they choose to go to school later.
     
  8. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #8
    Race completely aside, because there's more to going pro than simply "being good enough."

    Making the transition from a high-school environment to a collegiate environment is difficult, and many players - of any talent level - are unable to completely and successfully make the transition. There's more to it than being a good player; there are added levels of maturity, responsibility, etc. that are expected of you. Whereas you were a stud in high school and surrounded by players you could dominate, at the college level everyone else is really, really good, too; you're no longer the superstar you once were, and that's a huge blow to the psyche of many players.

    Now imagine jumping from high school to the pros, all at once. Those transitions are magnified.

    I'm not saying it can't be done, I'm saying that across the board, it's probably not a good idea. The NFL has shown recently that their policy of requiring a player to be out of high school for three years works out well - look at Maurice Clarett.

    As far as whether this has anything to do with race, my argument doesn't; I'm not sure what those fools are fussing about, or why they're even bringing race into it.
     
  9. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #9
    The guys on the radio were stating that African-Americans were both overrepresented in the NBA but also as more likely to leave college early if the NBA called. A white player is more likely to turn down the NBA, statistically, according to them, if the NBA wanted them.

    It's as if the two white men, both paid a fraction of any NBA player, were complaining that the NBA was luring too many African-American college students away from finishing a college degree. It sounded as if they were equating the NBA as a bad influence on the black community as much as handguns or crack. Basically, I think it was two guys just taking up airtime in order to make higher ratings. The sister station has Michael Savage piped in and the two radio stations have an intense rivalry.

    If it's not some bait inducing topic like this, the radio station will actually find that "disgraced" politician to tell his side of his story on sex addiction, or put on an ex pornstar to talk about women's health and morality.

    .......

    OK, about your transition story from high school to college. I can hear what you are saying. Let's gradually ramp up to that level. It's done more in football. But what about baseball, and then getting kids (or teens) from other countries? ie) Fernando Valenzuela, a teen phenom with little or no college play, and arguably one of the best LA Dodger pitchers in their history.
     
  10. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #10
    No doubt he was an exceptional player - but then again, that's what I'm talking about. Most are not exceptional. We don't hear about all the busts that occur for every Valenzuela.
     
  11. SactoGuy18 macrumors 68020

    SactoGuy18

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2006
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA USA
    #11
    63dot,

    I think you kind of lost me on your rant--I think!

    But seriously, the results of the year's NCAA basketball tournament with Butler and Duke in the final proves one thing: it could be a harbinger of the end of the "one and done" rule. Notice that both teams are loaded with highly-experienced juniors and seniors?

    If I were President Obama, I'd like to see him invite NBA Commissioner David Stern, NBPA President Derek Fisher, and NCAA interim President Jim Isch together to work out a deal to require a two-year waiting period after high school graduation before joining an NBA team through draft or as a free agent. That way, at least we'll see basketball players stay with a college team at least two seasons, which will help a LOT in learning how to play as part of a team (even great NBA players that came right from high school to the NBA like Kobe Bryant and Dwight Howard took two seasons to really build up their skills).
     
  12. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #12
    Basketball is a skill like any other. Then should there be an age requirement for musicians to get signed to major record labels or actors to get signed to a major studio? Would you want to have an interim "actors/musician" scale salary cap on any working actors or musicians below a certain age?

    To be a young, high end actor or musician, you have to be very disciplined beyond your years, and work well with lots of other people. It can be a shock, however, to be such a young, highly paid star. I had a friend, Barry Cowsill, who told me how brutal it was to work so hard and have a lot of money at such a young age. He explained this is a major reason why so many child and teenage stars went astray later in their lives. I have heard the same argument for basketball.

    Another friend of mine, an African-American with a B.S. degree truly believes to go pro into the NBA, one should be required to have a bachelor's degree just in case they leave the league early and have to have something more mundane and practical to do. And he's of the belief to be competitive on the job market, after a person leaves the NBA, even if it's 20 years after leaving the NBA, they will benefit from that 4 year degree.

    He did believe getting signed before finishing college led a lot of people who would have otherwise stayed in college to chase after the big money, thus giving the message to young people that money meant more than an education. He blamed Kobe's sexual assault charges on the fact he didn't do college basketball. To me, I blame Kobe's actions on him, not whether he has a degree or not.

    We all need money to survive, but not everybody needs a bachelor's degree to make it in this world, unless you think the 3/4s of Americans who don't have a bachelor's degree are all doing poorly in today's society and all with a bachelor's degree or higher are doing well.
     
  13. TechieJustin macrumors 6502

    TechieJustin

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #13
    This is why I hate all professional and college sports. Its no longer about the game, its about squeezing another nickel out of the fans. Its just as bad as pro wrestling.
     
  14. opinioncircle macrumors 6502a

    opinioncircle

    Joined:
    May 17, 2009
    #14
    I think college athletes should be required to complete some form of graduation, at best their bachelor's to go pro. I think given the insecurities in the world of pro sport, they should have a fall back plan.

    It probably could avoid the G. Arenas case or the Chris Andersen case in the NBA...
     
  15. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Location:
    Birmingham, AL
    #15
    I recall reading somewhere (unfortunately I can't remember where) that most NBA and NFL players end up broke or close to it after they retire. I don't know the numbers on the NBA as I don't care much about basketball, but the average NFL stint is a whopping 4 years. Being able to do something after sports would go a long way in ameliorating that.
     
  16. opinioncircle macrumors 6502a

    opinioncircle

    Joined:
    May 17, 2009
    #16
    I can understand to splash money when you have bunches of it. But I think they would benefit from it. As far as the NBA is concerned, I know that they have a seminar about managing your money. Does not seem to be working really well...
     

Share This Page