Stuck in an era

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by lowendlinux, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. lowendlinux, Jun 2, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019

    lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    North Country (way upstate NY)
    #1
    People who frequent this sub-forum know my musical tastes and politics are stuck in a different era. My job since I had to relocate to the states has gone from über conservative men to über modern women who roll their eyes at my dedication to 90's era hyper political punk. I'm not really stuck in the 90's but I like my political punk and believe that generationX with Epitaph and Fat Wreck cornered that idea. I've been going through the modern bands on both labels I haven't been able to find the young guys who make stuff like this.


    --- Post Merged, Jun 2, 2019 ---
    Lets throw all of our modern socio-political music in one thread so this old goat can learn.



    Does political music even belong to punk anymore or has hip hop taken that mantle?
     
  2. MetalCores macrumors regular

    MetalCores

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    #2
    Im not sure where political music belongs anymore. All I know is that there will never be music as good as 90s music ever again
     
  3. iTurbo macrumors 6502

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    #3
    Wowsers, NOFX!

    I recently met a distant cousin of mine, and he is way into that. My own twin brother was too back then. I mostly got into the indie rock stuff. My iTunes library was mostly built by my twin brother, but he passed away in '09. My cousin was mentioning bands and I was like.....wow, I have all of that stuff and didn't even know!
     
  4. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #4
    My cousin discovered Ich Bin ein Auslander by Pop Will Eat Itself and I heard that playing loud rather often.
     
  5. iTurbo macrumors 6502

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    #5
    I mostly got into Pavement back then. A lot of my friends were listening to NOFX, Rancid, Lillingtons at the time. I just never really identified with anything punk myself.

    At the time, I was working as a dishwasher at a restaurant in Best Western. I washed dishes to Pat Metheny Group. True story.
     
  6. sean000 macrumors 68000

    sean000

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    #6
    I'm just not as up on the latest music, but every generation tends to have at least something political. I was old enough to drink in 1991, so I started listening to political music (mostly punk) in the 80's: The Dead Kennedy's, the Clash, Sex Pistols, the Minutemen, Black Flag, Descendants, Fear. Somehow I missed out on Minor Threat until I first heard Fugazi some time in the early 90's. Then there was Bikini Kill, early Sleater-Kinney, etc. (Kathleen Hanna of Bikini Kill also later fronted the equally awesome and very political electronic dance music group Le Tigre)

    I think political music has always been there, and will always be, across many different genres... but at least in the United States it certainly seems like punk rock , folk music, and hip-hop are the genres that come to mind first when someone mentions political music. Punk is associated with many ideologies (mostly leftist, but there are some right-wing punk bands out there) and broader political and social movements.

    In the late 80's and early 90's I got very much into Billy Bragg, who blended folk, punk, and politics in a way that appealed to me more than traditional political folk music. Then I got into early alt-country like Uncle Tupelo. Their material was very political, and like Billy Bragg they were inspired by early political folk heroes like Woody Guthrie. Again I think part of the appeal for me was that they were blending traditional country and bluegrass with a bit of punk rock.

    Last week I listened to a fascinating podcast about the conscious rap movement of the 80's. It was an episode of Kai Wright's new podcast called The Stakes and he talks with, among others Kool-Moe-Dee. They talk about how rap and hip-hop started off to be very political (e.g., Public Enemy, KRS-One, Eazy-E and N.W.A.) but later became less so as artists became more focused on selling records and hip-hop became a valued commodity in the music industry. It's an interesting interview that I wish was longer (it's only 24 minutes). I guess even punk became a bit more of a valued commodity, but I'm sure there are still plenty of political punk bands out there... just as there are still political hip-hop artists and folk singers. Maybe they are just on newer independent labels. Epitaph and Fat Wreck Chords have been around a long time (Dischord as well) and their catalogs have diversified over time and no longer focus on a single scene or movement. Even some punk rockers and political rappers eventually get to a point in their lives when paying the bills is more important than making a statement, so the real risk-taking belongs to the young artists and young labels.
     
  7. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #7
    Erm... a lot of political music happened in the 1980's. The 1990's were bland as oatmeal.
     
  8. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #8
    there will never be music as good as 90s 50-80s music ever again. :D
     
  9. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #9
    Not so much the 70's IMO. :p
     
  10. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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  11. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #11
  12. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #12
    Punk? What’s wrong with you! :p;)
     
  13. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    Toronto
    #13
    Good music is awesome, good music that makes you think is even better. Even pop songs can have a political bend to them (hence my signature, referencing "The Police" lyrics)
     
  14. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #14
    My mom dropped me on my head when I was a baby...
     
  15. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #15
    Every era of popular music has its rebels and establishment fans alarmed at divergence from customs of a previous time. It's probably part of the rites of passage of a human being to do something differently, make the world more one's own than that of a previous generation. It's often been said that all art is subversive -- and by some that it's all propaganda-- and certainly music can be both of those, whether by sins of omission or commission.

    In music we are necessarily dealing at least in part with (or, hah, against!) fundamental resonance and harmonic series phenomena that are a part of the physics of the universe we occupy.

    George Harrison for instance chose to use a tritone (the devil's tone, an augmented fourth) in several of his songs for the Beatles. It was surely not the most startling feature of music by those British kids.

    But, that did not go unnoticed either, especially by classically trained musicians of both eastern and western traditions, whether or not they too had ended up fans or performers in the ever-expanding genres of popular music.

    After the Beatles came more open experimentation in rock with other than Western harmonies, and more willingness of western audiences to hear "world music", even as third world players imported characteristics of western rock to performances of their own music. Sometimes they encountered local resistance to change, too, similarly to how Elvis Presley was greeted by establishment culture curators in the USA like Ed Sullivan.
    So each generation of music lovers and music makers finds its own way, chooses influencers, acquires imitators, ends up with avid fans. Each of those in turn, in some way or another, has ended up either an inventor or someone making do with --or spinning off something new from-- someone else's creation or discovery.

    Music production adventures are still somewhat the same now as in ancient times: there were always some shepherds, hunters, fishers who created new instruments and ways of human music making, e.g., flutes from the wing bones of birds or the thigh bones of bears, from hollow reeds or from stones riddled with holes made by sea worms.


    Other people in a same generation in ancient times were more like the most of us today, lucky enough to have discovered some musical instrument, and to figure out or be taught how to make music on it... or lucky just to be someone who heard someone else playing, and was uplifted by it, for reasons not even understood.

    What's there for the playing or listening: solace, elation, comfort, ways to blow off steam, shrug off a hard day or celebrate a special one. Long may our differences and rebellions keep offering up new choices of music to expand our horizons.
     

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14 June 2, 2019