Students Rebel Against Dress Code

jkcerda

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 10, 2013
682
38,980
Criminal Mexi Midget
y Wearing Crop Tops and Cutoffs


To dispute the dress code, many teen girls at Tottenville High School are wearing overtly revealing outfits. About 90 percent of the detentions due to dress code violations have been issued to female students, the Post reports. First-time offenders receive a warning, but a second infraction warrants a phone call home to parents, who are then asked to bring replacement clothes for their kid. Or if the parent or guardian is unavailable to do so, the student will be provided appropriate clothing.
I am glad SOME of the teens are awake enough to make these statements below.


Some students have shared their frustrations with the fashion police on social media. “I didn’t go to public school to be told how ‘I’m allowed’ to express myself … I can respect myself 150% and still wear shorts and a tank top,” Katelyn wrote on Twitter. “Maybe instead of worrying about what I’m wearing, you should worry about the fact that I’m going to graduate high school with next to no life skills whatsoever.”
hope those girls make it to college.
 

aaronvan

Suspended
Dec 21, 2011
1,349
9,287
República Cascadia
Only a teen could make a trite statement like, "They should just worry about our eduction, not our clothes" and believe that is a sophisticated observation.

“Maybe instead of worrying about what I’m wearing, you should worry about the fact that I’m going to graduate high school with next to no life skills whatsoever.”

Wow, another ignorant statement. Get your face out of your iPhone and maybe, just maybe, you'll accrue some "life skills."
 
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Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
I'm for dress codes at school. My daughter has went to both public and private school. When the kids wore a uniform to school there wasn't a huge contest of who could have the most fashionable sweater or skirt. They all got their clothes from the same place, paid the same price. Even the sneakers that they could buy were listed in the handbook.

Dress codes are really a plus for students whose parents don't have money to buy new school clothes every year. Uniforms from upperclassmen are often passed down and thrift stores always have them.

My daughter is in middle school now where everything is a popularity contest.
 

skottichan

macrumors 6502a
Oct 23, 2007
879
901
Columbus, OH
What kills me, when I look at my mom's yearbooks (1973-1976), there were crop tops (on boys and girls, so navels... everywhere), jeans so tight, and skirts so short, you could almost see labia.

And this was at a public high school in conservative rural Ohio.
 

shinji

macrumors 65816
Mar 18, 2007
1,306
1,497
This is more, "I want attention" than, "I have a legitimate ideological argument against the concept of dress codes."
 

Southern Dad

macrumors 68000
May 23, 2010
1,532
547
Shady Dale, Georgia
What kills me, when I look at my mom's yearbooks (1973-1976), there were crop tops (on boys and girls, so navels... everywhere), jeans so tight, and skirts so short, you could almost see labia.

And this was at a public high school in conservative rural Ohio.
I graduated from high school in rural Ohio, too… If you showed up at school in a tank top, skirt too short or other inappropriate clothing, you'd better have a change of clothing or you were going home.
 

zioxide

macrumors 603
Dec 11, 2006
5,725
3,711
Dress codes are pointless and practically a form of socialist indoctrination. ;) The students are spot on. The school should be worrying about the crap education and guidance they are giving the students. As long as the students aren't wearing something clearly inappropriate, they should be free to wear whatever they want. This is America, right?
 

lannister80

macrumors 6502
Apr 7, 2009
476
17
Chicagoland
As long as the students aren't wearing something clearly inappropriate, they should be free to wear whatever they want. This is America, right?
Right, so what's "clearly inappropriate"? That's the crux of the matter.

PS - I liked my public school education just fine.
 

Mousse

macrumors 68020
Apr 7, 2008
2,047
2,678
Flea Bottom, King's Landing
I can respect myself 150% and still wear shorts and a tank top,” Katelyn wrote on Twitter.
As a math guy, hyperbole like this one really grinds my gears. It makes me question the intelligences of the person making that statement. I am going to assume the extra 50% her stupidity.

May as well leave your tea bag in your tea while in England.:mad: Stiff upper lip chap, he's American.:p Or refer to hockey as ice hockey in Canada; as if there's any other kind.:rolleyes: Field hockey, sledge hockey, ball hockey ain't REAL hockey. Ask any Canadian.;)
 

Jessica Lares

macrumors G3
Oct 31, 2009
9,199
722
Near Dallas, Texas, USA
You can show your originality within a dress code. There's lots of nice clothes other than things with logos and pictures.

Tanktops are too problematic. I remember in public school they had a rule that they had to have straps of a certain thickness and that one of my friends got in trouble for it and her mother was so angry about it. She felt like she and her daughter were always isolated out for dress code issues. There's also the problem that some of us don't have the shoulders to support the straps.

I also have a friend who never could wear shorts because she was too tall and they didn't fit her properly.

The reasoning they used to give us at private school was that they wanted us to dress like we were going to work. School isn't a place where you get up in what you went to bed in and go there to lounge around. And around the time I was in 6th grade, that was the thing that a lot of the girls were doing at public school.
 

impulse462

macrumors 68000
Jun 3, 2009
1,697
2,203
I went to a private school where we had a dress code. I didn't mind it, because I would always knew what I was wearing the next day. The kids who want a dress code want it to look "better" but that's not the case.

Even with a dress code, the attractive people still look attractive and the ugly people still look ugly. Personally, I wouldn't care either way.
 

rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,408
For those supporting a school dress code, are you also for schools eliminating unhealthy foods?
 

bradl

macrumors 601
Jun 16, 2008
4,006
11,823
True story for me; sorta relevant to the thread, but take it as you will.

My high school has a long running tradition for seniors as they are cramming for finals and getting ready for graduation. We have a week where they pretty much show it, as the tests were that tough and we were studying our asses off. We called it "Senior Slob Week". We'd come to school in torn pants (even though they were in fashion), shirts with food stains on it, 5 o'clock shadows, girls had no makeup, basically looking like we were up all night (some of us were).

When it came time for my class, I took one day, put on a pair of shorts, a shirt, my house robe, and a pair of Goofy slippers I bought at the Disney store, and went to school. Got a bunch of looks from people, some laughing, but hey, I was a slob. Some caught onto it and thought it was really cool. Then I got called to the principal's office, because they actually thought I had nothing on underneath. Took off the robe, and showed them that I had on my Senior Slob week shirt, and a pair of shorts; the only thing out of the ordinary was my slippers, which compared to Timberland boots or even the old Reebok Pumps, wasn't that bad.

The principal thought it was a great idea, and sent me on my way. I didn't violate school or district dress code! Unfortunately, because there really wasn't a strict dress code, you always get the one upsmanship game going, where someone tries to outdo you...

.. In my case, someone the following day came to school with a bath towel, and didn't know that I actually had clothes on under my robe instead of pajamas. Let's just say that the towel was pulled off, and they didn't have anything to cover underneath it. :eek:

I can see both sides of it; as long as you don't get too carried away or do/wear something outlandish in the name of 'freedom of expression', you can have some good fun at a school dress code's expense.

BL.

P.S. I still have those Goofy slippers. The exact pair here. I picked up some Wakko Warner Animaniacs slippers a year later. still have those, too.

 

skottichan

macrumors 6502a
Oct 23, 2007
879
901
Columbus, OH
I graduated from high school in rural Ohio, too… If you showed up at school in a tank top, skirt too short or other inappropriate clothing, you'd better have a change of clothing or you were going home.
Yeah, I **** you not, in my mom's mid-70's year book, there is a picture of a girl hanging the star on the school's Christmas tree and the hem of her skirt is up so far you can see panties.

I went to a Catholic girls' school in the 90's, and a lot of girls would roll the waist of their skirts till you could see the bottom of their butt.
 

samiwas

macrumors 68000
Aug 26, 2006
1,575
3,518
Atlanta, GA
My Junior High and High School (private school) had a dress code, but not a uniform. The requirements were basically a collared shirt, pants (no jeans), no tennis shoes, and on Fridays a coat and tie, but the coat could be removed after assembly.

Still plenty of wiggle room to be original, but also to still be tasteful and professional.
 

capathy21

macrumors 65816
Jun 16, 2014
1,365
534
Houston, Texas
How in the world are those related?
Because we find it funny that the very people who scream "government overreach" when kids are encouraged to eat healthy at school have no problem with the government telling their kids what to wear. In either case the government is mandating what your child can and cannot do. Why is one acceptable but not the other?
 

swingerofbirch

macrumors 68040
I think dress codes (outside of existing obscenity laws) are inappropriate. Schools are public, government buildings.

How would we feel if we were denied access to a DMV or public library based on the way we chose to dress?

What makes the case against uniforms or dress codes even more compelling is that unlike a DMV or library, education is compulsory. It's government overreach—although it's usually instigated by a single busy body type and continues through inertia.

This is a country where military recruiters are in our schools trying to convince young people to take up arms in combat. If they can be trusted with automatic weapons, shouldn't they be able to handle "distracting" clothing?