Suing your school because you don't get a job

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Shivetya, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. Shivetya macrumors 65816

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    #1
    http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/08/03/new.york.jobless.graduate/index.html

    Basically what is going down is that while she did graduate from school and had good attendance her GPA was lackluster at 2.7. Her claim is that since she did what the school requested/suggested by sending out resumes and such that its their fault she did not have better success. Given that the article states only two replied and no job offer came about what do you think of her suit?

    Frankly, I think she is just not accepting reality, with a depressed job market new graduates are up against experience and in her case better graduates. As such she simply found a sympathetic reporter who ran with a story of poor little girl versus evil school.

    She really comes off as if she feels entitled to a job just because she went to school. Either a sucker for a colorful college brochure or raised with expectations that are not realistic or healthy.
     
  2. thegoldenmackid macrumors 604

    thegoldenmackid

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  3. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #3
    Spoiled-brattism at its finest! One thing for sure, this will get her name high on a personnel manager's list of "Don't call." Who would want to have that sort of litigious twit as an employee?
     
  4. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #4
    Maybe she should have gone to a credible business school... Monroe College? I'm not sure I would've hired someone from Monroe College with a 3.8, let alone a 2.7. :rolleyes: :eek:

    Seriously, this sort of thing does unfortunately feed into the idea that torts are one of the few kinds of creativity we reward as a society.

    It also amuses me how many times she mentions her attendance record and describes her GPA as "all right." Maybe whoever helps these people write resumes and cover letters did fail her....
     
  5. mbpnewbie macrumors regular

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    #5
    Wait, I don't get it... woman is sueing a school because she went to it, achieved medioctity, and can't find a job in this hopeless job market?
    And a 2.7 at a business school in the bronx? Yeah, I think we have a winner here!
     
  6. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #6
    Scans of her eloquent, handwritten complaint can be found here.

    It must be a major blow to the defendant's case as after 4 years of schooling, this woman failed to learn to spell tuition correctly.

    College is not for everyone. Welcome to the education bubble.
     
  7. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #7
    1. I've never heard of Monroe College in the Bronx. Can someone from the area comment on the quality of this institution of higher learning?

    2. Is a BBA really all that in-demand? After all, Business Administration, as a degree, is really only valuable with some real-world work experience, right?

    3. She has a 2.7 GPA and she's pissed off because the placement office is working harder to place the students who got a 4.0. Well, no s**t.

    4. Boo-hoo, why me, it's all someone else's fault, blah blah blah blah...

    I'm with Shivetya on this one - "cry for me."
     
  8. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #8
    Amazing. Simply amazing.

    Just because you attended and graduated a school, certification course, or other, does not guarantee a job offering, nor a job.

    But it is a rather interesting variation of tuition or Tutision as she put it if I read it correctly. :p
     
  9. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #9
    If I have this straight she is suing her school for no job.

    Her GPA is AVERAGE at best. It is a Business degree which is a JOKE degree to begin with. A degree in business should never be a primary degree but a supplemental degree.

    Lets see the economy is in the crapper what do you expect. You have people with higher conditional and experience competing for the same spots.

    Hell I have a 4 year degree from the College of Engineering and I do not have a job and I can not find one. LET ME go sue Texas Tech for everything because I lost my job and can not find another....

    I know people who left with my same degree and can not find employment.....

    I do not expect this to go any where. I noticed it that it was not a lawyer handling the case which tells me that none of them would touch it knowing it is joke case.
     
  10. steve2112 macrumors 68040

    steve2112

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    #10
    If she thinks she is having problems getting a job now, just wait until her next potential employer pulls up her name in a search.
     
  11. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #11
    I believe they call that shooting yourself in the foot. :)
     
  12. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #12
    No kidding lol
     
  13. rhsgolfer33 macrumors 6502a

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    Why? I'm graduating from a very small private college that I can almost guarantee no one on this board has heard of unless they happen to live in my area, but all the major accounting firms hire there, large financial companies, etc. Just because you haven't heard of the school doesn't mean its not credible or that its graduates aren't worthy of being hired.

    Its accredited by one of the six major regional accrediting bodies, so the school is probably acceptable. I don't imagine it attracts the top students and professors, but then again, only relatively few schools in the world attract the top few percent of students and professors.

    That is at best your opinion, many, including myself, will have a different one. What do you suggest people get degrees in? Should they major in English perhaps and then get an MBA? What is your logic behind this? If you intend to work in business, finance, marketing, etc. there is nothing wrong with getting a business degree from the start.

    A degree isn't a joke if you're majoring in something you enjoy and are interested in. For me it happens to be business and accounting, even coming from a small private college I'll have no problem getting an accounting job.


    All of that said, this lady is a jackass. First off, a 2.7 is a very low GPA for a college student. The economy is down, she should deal with the fact that if firms are hiring at all they are looking for top talent, not someone who couldn't even pull a B average.
     
  14. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #14
    It more people get a degree in business. MBA are over valued in my opinion. but people go get a degree in business but with no real backing to it. A business degree to me is worthless unless it is supplementing something else. We already have to many people being managers who have no clue what the people under them are doing or could not even have a hope in hell of being able to do it.

    A degree in accounting is a degree in accounting and the business part supplements it but a business degree should never be a primary degree.
     
  15. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #15
    There is if you don't already have significant work experience to go along with it. You don't come out of high school, get a business degree alone, have no work experience, then get hired as a manager - no credible business wants to work that way.

    I got my MBA after working for seven years in the engineering industry, and it has helped me immensely. It would have been nearly worthless without my other degree and/or work experience; not because I wouldn't have any business knowledge, but because understanding management without understanding an industry isn't all that desirable in a candidate.

    Then she should go home, shut up, and enjoy her degree - but that isn't the point.

    The point is that she's blaming the school because after spending $70,000 and scraping by with a 2.7 average nobody wants to hire her over the people who attended the same college and got a 4.0. Sure, she has a business degree - but without some other degree, and more importantly, without any work experience, she hasn't done enough to make herself a desirable candidate in business management.

    What he said. :cool:
     
  16. rhsgolfer33 macrumors 6502a

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    There aren't any businesses that work that way, you're correct. There are entry level non-management positions that most business majors get put in. That doesn't make it a joke degree or even a poor choice. You're probably not going to start anywhere different than any other major would, but at least you'll have some business knowledge and understanding of how management, finance, etc. function. Its also why business degrees tend to have emphasis, such as marketing, finance, accounting, IT, human resources, etc. You're versed in various business areas and have further knowledge of one area in which you can (hopefully) obtain an entry level position.

    There are aspects of a business that have little to do with the actual industry that a business operates in. For instance, is cost accounting side different for an engineering company than a bank? Sure, but most cost accountants could work for either company without a degree in engineering or finance. The same is true for an IT professional; an IT guy can go to work for law firm without a law degree and perform quite well in his job.

    In business there is lower and mid level staff that supports the overarching goal of a business without being heavily involved in the actual industry portion of that business; those positions are where you tend to start with a business degree. You learn more about the industry and specifics as you advance up the business ladder, but you don't have to have a BS in whatever the firm does to be a successful manager or even an executive. It works in the same manner at big accounting firms; many new accountants are hired with zero work experience, you start as a new hire / junior, then after about two years move to senior, then finally after a few more years to manager. No company is going to hire anyone, with any non-advanced degree or advanced degree without work experience and put them in a managerial role, no matter what the degree is in.

    The key, to me anyways, is not necessarily getting some degree other than business as your first degree, it is work experience (one of the biggest factors in MBA admission, coincidentally) before or after earning that degree.

    That comment wasn't about the tool bringing the lawsuit, it was about choosing majors in general. I think this woman and lawsuit are both pretty ridiculous.
     
  17. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    That's true, particularly if the degree is a BA or BS. Her degree is a BBA - which, like an MBA, tends to be far more general and much less specialized, even if you do have an emphasis in your course of study.

    If she had graduated with a BS in Accounting and couldn't land an accounting job with no experience, she'd have ever so slightly more of a leg to stand on. But a BBA - even with an IT emphasis (IT with a BBA, really?) - is still a rather broad course of study.
     
  18. dukebound85 macrumors P6

    dukebound85

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    #18
    believe it or not, certain degrees are more appealing to employers than others

    a BBA with a 2.7GPA is nothing to celebrate about IMO, especially when the amount of BBA holders with much higher GPA's are also having hard times finding work
     
  19. rhsgolfer33 macrumors 6502a

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    Ah, I see, I'm not particularly up on the BBA, I didn't know it was so general. I think we both agree that experience is quite important for anyone in a management position. You can have any number of degrees but not be of much of a manager if you haven't actually applied what you've learned and used it to solve problems in a real world setting within whatever industry you're in.

    Even if she had a BS in Accounting, there are plenty of accounting majors coming out with 3.0+, she'd have a pretty hard time with a GPA that low (it can be a tough major, but not tough enough to warrant a 2.7 GPA). Even in good times firms didn't really hire at the 2.7 GPA level, the recession has only increased the GPA threshold as more people are competing for the same or fewer accounting jobs.
     
  20. opinioncircle macrumors 6502a

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    #20
    I really don't understand why this is such a joke...
     
  21. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #21
    Because university in general used to be somewhat self-restricting to those on the above-average end of the intellectual scale. Unfortunately, the trend we've seen in recent years is that we tell practically everyone that in order to succeed, they need that college degree. Consequently, the college degree has become the new high school diploma. Furthermore, the increased accessibility of college means an increase in programs and courses of study, some of which have little to do with actually increasing one's employability.

    It can be argued that a general business degree falls into this category, rather like a degree in liberal arts or history (unless you want to become a teacher). It's becoming one of those degrees that students pursue just so they can say they have a degree. While there are those that will think that's all well and good, the downside is one of simple economics. If everyone has a BS degree, then those that have more than that are going to be the ones that stand out and are more likely to be hired.

    The hard truth that's being danced around here is that college doesn’t change one's intelligence, or more specifically, one's ability to learn. The A students will learn more than the C students. As indicated earlier, some college courses and programs don’t teach anything that will actually impart job skills that employers value. It follows, than, that requiring the average students to get a college degree as a credential is largely a waste of time and money. Coming back to the example at hand, this woman would have probably have better served herself in a secretarial or bookkeeping program.

    It would also do well for us to take note that in recent years, tuition rates and amounts of student loan debt have been rising at a rate that outstrips starting salaries by a significant margin. This is a near parallel to the recent housing situation, where home prices have outpaced income, with disastrous results. Food for thought.
     
  22. Sdashiki macrumors 68040

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    #22
    Ive never been in an interview for a job nor applied to one where they asked my GPA.

    Ive never put my GPA on my resume. Just my degree, College and graduating year.


    So, sure, youve got a bachelors...but why bring up your complete SH*T GPA when it only makes you look worse? She'd be alot better off, judging by the comments around the net, just saying she graduated with a degree and cant get a job. Still ludicrous, but at least she doesnt come off as anything but a jerk.

    Adding the 2.7 GPA makes the woman by the numbers, dumb...not just because thats a pretty low GPA, but because its being used in a lawsuit dealing with educational standards and practices. Now she points out one of the yardsticks of higher ed, and she proves shes not measuring up.
     

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