Supporting Independent Artists Much?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by vpro, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. vpro macrumors 65816

    vpro

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    #1
    I thought I'd start this thread to open up discussion about supporting local talent, those in your communities, or in your circles, family, etc, etc… Who you know are exceptional and especially whom may need an extra boost in confidence, resources, support, encouragement, etc, etc.

    If anyone out there is able to fit these shoes and if you are already doing very much to offer a 'stepping stone' to emerging, established or aspiring artists near you, I would LOVE to read all about it.

    As I am a professional, independent recording artist, composer and producer, I have gained a lot of important support in my communities and I always have creative ways to pass on the good fortune through knowledge and practical - creative basis, interactive free arts jams with the communities, open the public to witness the positivity and participate in the enrichment of their communities.

    Many people help from their wallets, while others help from physical strength, car pooling, organizing offices, cleaning, cooking, care taking, etc, etc…

    Please feel free and brave to share your experiences, or if you recognize those who go out of their way but totally within their means to extend a helping hand.

    I can't wait to read some of your awesomeness..

    Thank you ^_^
     
  2. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
    #2
    I always loved Live music. I would go as much as can but in America Live Music venues are harder and harder to find today compared to 25 years ago.

    Today with YouTube and Vimeo self promotion seems to the key to a good independent ticket. Plus have a good self promoter and able to get eyes on jigs and once in while give out freebees to CDs/Downloads and always read carefully music contracts.

    Lastly I always felt the demise of independent radio stations has hurt independent music like no other. So self promotion is the key to success!
     
  3. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Location:
    Scotland
    #3
    I am a lecturer in a UK University. When I arrived from the US, I naturally assumed there would be local, not-for-profit campus radio that would highlight local talent, which is what I experienced as a student in the US university system. Unfortunately this is not the case, and the radio stations in the UK are utter crap. It's either top 40 over-processed fluff, or brief snippets of the endlessly repeated classical pieces (never the full concerto's, mind you). I find myself having to listen to Indy stations in the US and one of the campus radio stations I used to listen to (WPRB) via internet radio.
     
  4. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #4
    Thats because the cost of running an FM station legally in the UK is so expensive. The only music scene that does effectively share a promote new talent in the UK is the underground electronic music scene relying on podcasting, internet radio and around major cities pirate radio.

    Commercial radio will only play certain music as they have to pay per play.... So instead of playing what they want and tracking and paying the royalties themselves most stations will subscribe to a database, the company will then look after the royalties and payments on behalf of the record station. The other side to this is that record companies will pay a radio station to play new releases a certain amount of times per day/week in order to make them popular. Esssentially radio in the UK is a farce dominated by the BBC and other big players.

    One thing that is still vibrant here is the live music and festival scene which has grown hugely since about the year 2000. However local councils and police forces seems to have declared war in particular on festivals and especially those with any electronic music, and since around 2008 have done huge amounts of damage to the scene and to the industry.
     
  5. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2009
    Location:
    Scotland
    #5
    Agreed. I do not understand is why the BBC plays rubbish that's hard to distinguish from a commercial station. If you want Indy from the BBC, it's only broadcast for a limited segment during the week (or at east that used to be the case - I do not listen to proper radio for music these days because it got so frustrating).

    As for festivals, well, I am a bit geriatric to enjoy sloshing around in the mud, and the local live music where I live is odd: one group insist on displaying the Confederate flag from the US Civil War. Weird.
     
  6. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #6
    I echo the sentiments of the poster who said live music is getting harder to find. Even in Austin, live music venues are closing. That being said, the live music venues here are mostly still going strong with local talent. I can't technically verify these are all "indie", but at least they started this way (in Austin).

    Carolyn Wonderland is a really good singer and guitarist. I would recommend her to just about anyone.

    Band of Heathens started here, also. They are bigger than they used to be, but they're among my favorite country rock bands.

    Quiet Company is another band I enjoy hits of (their albums get a little slow).

    The biggest up and coming name out of Austin, however, is almost certainly Gary Clark, Jr. He strikes me as possibly the best Austin guitarist since SRV.

    Austin has two NPR stations. The all music station is KUTX and you can stream all the Indie stuff on their website.
     
  7. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #7
    I've just started listening to a couple of shows again recently, but I've never really listened to the radio much..... BBC 1xtra is quite, I've started listening to the David Rodigan reggae show, and I like some of the radio documentaries the BBC do.

    You can never be to old/geriatric to enjoy sloshing about in the mud, if thats the aspect thats putting you off going to a festival, then you're probably going to the wrong festival ;) I reckon I've been to 50 odd festivals now, and the only ones I avoid like the plague are the big commercial ones, like glastonbury, reading etc.....

    I think in some respects the music scene itself is as vibrant as it always has been, but the onus has changed as devices for making electronic music have become more affordable and especially in the UK there's a big reggae and roots revival, of course both of those scenes have always been a bit anti authoritarian and councils are wary of events playing those styles of music. Indie had its day, but it allowed itself to get washed out by the "industry"
     
  8. lannister80 macrumors 6502

    lannister80

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    Apr 7, 2009
    Location:
    Chicagoland
    #8
    I hate to say it, but I essentially stopped caring about music when I turned 25 or so. I just...don't care anymore. I listen almost exclusively to NPR news on the way to and from work.

    I spend the rest of my day either (a) at work, with no music, or (b) at home, taking care of kids and hanging out with wife, also with no music.

    My mp3 collection hasn't grown hardly at all in the last 8 or 9 years.
     
  9. Happybunny macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    #9
    Since the arrival of format radio (ie Sky radio, Arrow classic rock) the whole medium has gone into decline. There is very little scope for bands to get air play anymore. Back in the early eighties there were still radio shows that gave, up and coming artists a chance for some air time. But now it's commercial, all hype over substance, the play list is determined by the recording companies.:mad:
    As for open air festivals, I got started back in 1971 Isle of Wight.
    I used to go to Pink Pop nearly every year, the last time was 2009, when Bruce Springsteen was the top act.
     
  10. vpro thread starter macrumors 65816

    vpro

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    #10
    Thank you all.

    Thanks everyone, great discussion so far I appreciate all of this really.

    If anyone is interested in the sort of music and arts I'm producing / part of please do not hesitate to make friends here as well as message me, and I would love to share more.

    I am always seeking support in creative ways, from trades to encouragement, sharing and free things. I love getting and giving away free things. It promotes longevity of "things" and good health because it brings great joy.

    Best always!

    ^_^
     
  11. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    A man of the people. The right sort of people.
    #11
    I'm with lannister80 on this one. Somewhere in my early to mid-20s music stopped being relevant to me. (Perhaps interesting that we were born in the same year).

    As someone who really enjoys music, I blame the industry, and artists for that. They simply stopped putting out content that kept me interested. I can think of one album in the past 10 years + that I'd actually have paid for and been happy about it.

    Taste aside - I'd like to see the middle-man cut out and artists supported through a crowd-funding medium. Put your promo on site, if people like it, and want more from you, they'll donate. That would kill of the current trend of style-over-substance.

    Crowd-funding isn't a joke anymore, you can raise 100's of thousands in a short period of time.
     
  12. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #12
    Clearly you have just stopped looking.
     
  13. vpro thread starter macrumors 65816

    vpro

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    #13
    True.

    Most of the support I get are from the public. Though being that I am not a producer of music anything close to popular it makes it a little more challenging but for the most part, it has been great, I have a better and closer relationship with those who love my art form than when I was becoming more popular, those days I'm glad are behind me.

    To have more artistic control and freedom to share what ever you feel is most sincere is really a lost kind of art.

    Yes?

    At least in Canada there are TONS of funding bodies including private and government, I know it is way more difficult in the States so "crowd funding" has really helped a lot of my musical friends State side.

    Speaking of which, I will be in the Boston / NYC area this winter from Dec till June. Come say hi and check out my shows if you're in the area or around, introduce me to your musical circles!?

    I will be not for profit while in the States so any support would be appreciated.

    Best to everyone!

    ^_^

    Next week is my birthday so my tradition is to make all my music library online free for download for the week, so check back for news on that friends.


    :eek:
     
  14. niuniu macrumors 68020

    niuniu

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    A man of the people. The right sort of people.
    #14
    Nope.
     
  15. vpro thread starter macrumors 65816

    vpro

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    #15
    Back on topic now.

    Well back on topic..

    What I really am looking for is how many people are willing to support a local independent artist if they were aware of one, as opposed to searching the gigantic catalogues of artists/music out there, surely there are plenty where you are and right here, right now as I type and as I reach out to this fine community of savvy individuals.

    If given the opportunity to help one independent artist succeed and this artist in turn gives back so much to their communities, while enriching the lives of all who support her, would you jump at that opportunity? Have you jumped to such an occasion before - or all of you comfortable to sit back and scroll through the lists of likes and dislikes, popular and fridge? Is that the way you feel support means or is it something more proactive, more involved and engaging with the artist that feels more right?


    Thank you ^_^
     
  16. tshrimp macrumors 6502

    tshrimp

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2012
    #16
    I am fortunate enough to live in a town where almost every weekend, and many weekdays, bands will be setup playing in the downtown square. People all over town tend to come down to watch. (and listen)
     
  17. sim667 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    #17
    Well I'm thirty and to me isn't a interest, its a lifestyle....... I've become interested in DJ'ing over the last 2 years...... But I still listen to music as much as possible (mainly in the car too and from work).

    I would say I've got about 20,000 MP3's, 800 cd's and I've started buying reggae vinyl.

    I live near london so get to see gigs quite a lot, but the local music scene near to me is a bit stale. I'd like to change that, but no-one really has time/interest.
     
  18. Shotgun OS macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Location:
    Ohio
    #18
    In my community, independent music and art is the norm. Supporting underground, independent and up and coming bands is just engrained within the genres that I've associated myself with, and it's somewhat odd to me to hear about places that aren't like this. We have local promoters that work really hard to book bands wherever, even in basements and kitchens, with little to no payment in return. There are several house venues in my general area that lend their space out free of charge and on a donation basis, with all proceeds going to the bands. I've gone to several shows where I didn't even know the bands, just to support their message and get them to the next city. Maybe I'll pick up a record of a t-shirt, too.
     

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