Supreme Court Strikes Down CA Video Game Law

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by CalBoy, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #1
    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/la-na-0628-court-violent-video-20110628,0,5099090.story


    I've never been very comfortable with rating systems and restrictions on entertainment, so I applaud this decision. I wonder what will happen next year with the FCC challenge that the Supreme Court will be hearing.
     
  2. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #2
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but this turn of events will do nothing to prohibit GameStop et al from continuing to refuse to sell M-rated games to children (without a consenting parent present), just like movie theaters do with R-rated films.
     
  3. CalBoy thread starter macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #3
    I believe that is correct.

    California had gone one step further and mandated it by law, which I think was clearly overkill.
     
  4. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #4
    honestly I had no issue with the law saying you can not sell M rated games to minors. It is not like it is hard for parents to buy it for their kids but it is not like most retailers do not follow that restrictions any how.
    Hell honestly I do not know of any that will sell an M rated game to a minor.
     
  5. KingYaba macrumors 68040

    KingYaba

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    #5
    This is the only branch of government I have confidence in. :(
     
  6. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

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    #6
    Lets let the parents raise the kids and not law after law after law by the control freaks in govt who have nothing more to do then create law after law after law. I agree with this decision. If lil Johnny is playing something he shouldnt be you take it away, or dont let him get it in the 1st place. Its called personal responsibility.
     
  7. IntelliUser, Jun 28, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2011

    IntelliUser macrumors 6502

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    #7
    You can bypass all rating systems through purchasing online anyway.
    Ask your parents to put your allowance in a bank account and get yourself a credit card.
     
  8. codymac macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Bravo!
     
  9. quagmire macrumors 603

    quagmire

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    #9
    I don't see how this law excuses parents not to take responsibility to raise their kids. It just prevents stores from selling these games to minors. I believe GameStop already does this or something similar.
     
  10. rhett7660 macrumors G4

    rhett7660

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    #10
    That means the parents would have to actually be........parents. I think just from the posts on this forum, some don't know how to be!
     
  11. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    #11
    There has always been this weird tension between legislators badly wanting to censor media, especially for children, lacking the Constitutional authority to do so, but threatening to do so anyway as a way of coercing self-regulation from the industry under scrutiny. It's a toothless threat legally, but brings negative PR attention to the industry, and the industry historically buckles and institutes some voluntary ratings and enforcement scheme.

    See the "Comics Code Authority" for a particularly ridiculous example, which has finally dried up and blown away after more than fifty years.
     
  12. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

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    #12
    A zillion laws wont help that.
     
  13. CaoCao macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    Excellent,

    Frankly this guy could have made it in the CDF
     
  14. IntelliUser macrumors 6502

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    #14
    But what about

    [​IMG]
     
  15. CaoCao macrumors 6502a

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    #15
    He'd be appalled by that game.
     
  16. CalBoy thread starter macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #16
    I'm not so sure.

    Scalia is prudish about sex, but he seems to have no problem with violence or the portrayal of violence.
     
  17. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #17
    My wife was an ACSM at Gamestop for three years. As I said above, they won't sell an M-rated game to a minor without a parent present. That being said, you'd be surprised at the number of parents who have no problem buying overly violent or otherwise suggestive games for their 10 year olds. Next to the meth addicts and known thieves coming in to hawk systems and games, it was the biggest issue she had with working there.

    The parents that do care probably don't have the requisite time to screen every video game, album, or movie for their kids. The parents that don't care, just don't care.
     
  18. IntelliUser macrumors 6502

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    #18
    What's so wrong with 10 year olds playing M rated games anyway. They have probably already watched R-Rated movies and porn, and if not will in a couple of years tops.
     
  19. rhett7660 macrumors G4

    rhett7660

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    #19
    I agree!!!! Do I hear two zillion!!! :D
     
  20. 184550 Guest

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    #20
    Why cut my finger nails? They'll grow back.

    OT, I don't agree with the ruling. I can't think of a single video game off the top of my head that is comparable to historical literature, etc...
     
  21. IntelliUser macrumors 6502

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    #21
  22. quagmire, Jun 28, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2011

    quagmire macrumors 603

    quagmire

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    #22
    And then the parents complain when a M rated game has content they don't want their kids to be exposed to. :rolleyes:

    IE: Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 with the 'No Russian' mission. Same with Grand Theft Auto.

    Parents need to learn how to say no. If you don't want your kids running around Moscow International Airport killing civilians, drinking( although they do throw in the don't drink and drive mantra), running people over with cars in Liberty City/San Andreas/Vice City, picking up and killing prostitutes, stealing cars, etc..... THEN DON'T BUY THEM THE FREAKING GAME!!!!! Don't go off starting lawsuits and cry to the media how these evil game developers are developing games that are not suited for your precious 8 year old Little Jimmy........
     
  23. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #23
    I have absolutely no problem with ratings systems for movies or video games. In both cases the parent can choose to allow their children to view the content. These ratings don't prevent the parent from making that choice, they just prevent the child from making that choice for themselves.

    That seems pretty rational to me.

    But this thread is just one more example of why I'm glad I didn't have any kids.

    Who needs the headache?
     
  24. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #24
    For once, I agree with you. What's really interesting is that the court's position can be viewed that it should be permissible for 10 year olds to be allowed in to see movies rated R and above.
     
  25. CalBoy thread starter macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #25
    Technically it is permissible for a 10 year-old to do that now.

    The MPAA is not a binding legal force on anyone. It's just that 99% of all movies that make it to suburban theaters are made by a handful of studios, which coincidentally also happen to have a heavy hand in selecting the MPAA board members.
     

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